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Smash (TV series)

29-11-2021 · For the 1990 Swedish comedy miniseries, see Smash (miniseries). 2012 American television series SmashGenre

29-11-2021
For the 1990 Swedish comedy miniseries, see Smash (miniseries).
2012 American television series
Smash Title Card.jpgSmashGenreMusical
DramaCreated byTheresa RebeckBased onthe novel Smash by Garson KaninDeveloped byRobert Greenblatt (uncredited)Starring
  • Debra Messing
  • Jack Davenport
  • Katharine McPhee
  • Christian Borle
  • Megan Hilty
  • Anjelica Huston
  • Leslie Odom Jr.
  • Jeremy Jordan
  • Krysta Rodriguez
  • Andy Mientus
  • Raza Jaffrey
  • Brian d'Arcy James
Theme music composerMarc ShaimanOpening theme"5, 6, 7, 8" (Season 2)Composers
  • Marc Shaiman
  • Scott Wittman
  • Chris Bacon (score, episodes 7–32)
Country of originUnited StatesOriginal languageEnglishNo. of seasons2No. of episodes32 (list of episodes)ProductionExecutive producers
  • Craig Zadan
  • Neil Meron
  • Darryl Frank
  • Justin Falvey
  • Marc Shaiman
  • Scott Wittman
  • Steven Spielberg
  • Theresa Rebeck
  • David Marshall Grant
  • Joshua Safran
Producers
  • Jordon Nardino
  • Jim Chory
Production locationsBrooklyn, New YorkCinematography
  • Shelly Johnson (pilot only)
  • M. David Mullen
Editors
  • Andy Weisblum (pilot only)
  • Bill Henry
  • Camilla Toniolo
  • Allyson Johnson
Running time40–45 minutesProduction companies
  • Madwoman in the Attic, Inc.
    (2012)
    (season 1)
  • DreamWorks Television
  • Universal Television
DistributorNBCUniversal Television DistributionReleaseOriginal networkNBCPicture format1080i (HDTV)Original releaseFebruary 6, 2012 (2012-02-06) –
May 26, 2013 (2013-05-26)External linksOfficial website

Smash is an American musical drama television series created by playwright Theresa Rebeck and developed by Robert Greenblatt for NBC. Steven Spielberg served as one of the executive producers. The series was broadcast in the US by NBC and produced by DreamWorks Television and Universal Television. The series revolves around a fictional New York City theater community and specifically the creation of a new Broadway musical. It features a large ensemble cast, led by Debra Messing, Jack Davenport, Katharine McPhee, Christian Borle, Megan Hilty, and Anjelica Huston.

The show debuted on February 6, 2012, and its first season ended on May 14, 2012. Its second season premiered on February 5, 2013, and ended on May 26, 2013. NBC announced a change in their lineup in March 2013 and moved the show to Saturdays starting April 6, 2013.[1] The series was cancelled on May 10, 2013.[2][3] Second-season executive producer-show runner Josh Safran said the final episode of Season 2 worked as a series finale.[4]

The series, especially the pilot episode, enjoyed critical success. The first season received the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Choreography among four nominations. The series was also nominated for a Golden Globe Award for Best Television Series – Musical or Comedy and a Grammy Award for Best Song Written for Visual Media ("Let Me Be Your Star").

Episodes

Main article: List of Smash episodes
SeasonEpisodesOriginally aired
First airedLast aired
115February 6, 2012 (2012-02-06)May 14, 2012 (2012-05-14)
217February 5, 2013 (2013-02-05)May 26, 2013 (2013-05-26)

The show revolves around a group of characters creating new Broadway musicals, where everyone must balance their often chaotic personal life with the all-consuming demands of life in the theater. The series features original music by composers Marc Shaiman and Scott Wittman.

Season 1 (2012)

Main article: Smash (season 1)

Julia Houston (Debra Messing) and Tom Levitt (Christian Borle), a Broadway writing team, came up with the idea of a new musical based on the life of Marilyn Monroe titled Bombshell. Producer Eileen Rand (Anjelica Huston), in the midst of divorce proceedings from her philandering husband, jumps on board and brings with her Derek Wills (Jack Davenport), a difficult but brilliant director. Ivy Lynn (Megan Hilty) is initially cast as Marilyn, but is forced to deal with competition from the talented, yet naive ensemble member Karen Cartwright (Katharine McPhee). Julia's former lover Michael Swift (Will Chase) is initially cast in the role of Joe DiMaggio. However, when Julia and Michael's reunion causes serious trouble in her marriage to Frank (Brian d'Arcy James), the decision is made to fire Michael. The role of Marilyn is recast with film star Rebecca Duvall (Uma Thurman), leaving Ivy devastated. After a somewhat disastrous out-of-town opening in Boston, Rebecca has fallen sick due to a peanut allergy and the actor playing Joe departs the production for a better gig. Derek subsequently casts Karen in the role of Marilyn and Michael is reinstated as Joe. Karen discovers Ivy has slept with her fiancé Dev (Raza Jaffrey), while Eileen finds out that her assistant Ellis (Jaime Cepero) was the one who poisoned Rebecca and fires him. Karen gets through her debut and the season ends with the closing number being applauded by the audience.

Season 2 (2013)

Main article: Smash (season 2)

As Bombshell works to open on Broadway in New York City, the show runs into legal and creative troubles which threaten its future. Meanwhile, the cast and crew (featured in Season 1) attempt to find work. Karen meets two aspiring friends and partners (Kyle, a stage writer played by Andy Mientus, and Jimmy, a composer played by Jeremy Jordan) and tries to get their work noticed, especially by Derek. Derek works with Broadway star Veronica Moore (Jennifer Hudson), who becomes friends with Karen. Ivy gets the lead in Liaisons, a show based on the play Les Liaisons Dangereuses. Bombshell needs work in order to open on Broadway. First, Peter Gillman (Daniel Sunjata), a dramaturg with whom Julia had a rocky relationship is hired in order to help re-write the show. Second, Jerry (Michael Cristofer) replaces Eileen as the show's producer after she had to step down when the federal authorities found out (through Jerry's orchestration) that she had financed Bombshell with illegal money. Jimmy and Kyle's show, called Hit List, eventually goes to the New York Fringe Festival and then they meet a producer for an off-broadway theater called Manhattan Theatre Workshop. Karen quits Bombshell to be in Hit List because she has to choose one of them. Ivy takes Karen's role as Marilyn Monroe in Bombshell. Hit List starts rehearsals. Karen and Jimmy's relationship starts to develop but may cause some disturbance in the work place with Derek's secret feelings for Karen. Hit List goes to Broadway produced by Jerry and Bombshell and Hit List go head-to-head at the Tony Awards. Hit List wins 7 Tonys, which is more than Bombshell, however Bombshell wins Best Musical and Best Actress (Ivy Lynn) in a Leading Role.

Cast and characters

Main article: Characters of Smash
  • Debra Messing as Julia Houston,[5] a successful Broadway lyricist and the musical's co-writer. She is married with a son, but had an affair with Michael Swift, who played Joe DiMaggio in the initial Marilyn workshop. Houston is based on creator Theresa Rebeck.[6]
  • Jack Davenport as Derek Wills,[5] the director of the musical, who will stop at nothing to make the show a success. He has an on-and-off relationship with Marilyn workshop star Ivy Lynn, though he has also shown interest in Karen Cartwright and had a physical relationship with Rebecca Duvall during the Boston preview before she left the show.
  • Katharine McPhee as Karen Cartwright,[5] an ingenue from Iowa, who lands a successful audition and becomes a serious contender for the role of Monroe. Somewhat new to show business, her naiveté is generally scorned by her peers, though her talent is rarely called into question. She played Marilyn for the Boston preview, when Rebecca Duvall left. In Season 2, she helps Hit List get started and plays Amanda/Nina after she quits Bombshell.
  • Christian Borle as Tom Levitt,[5] a theatrical composer and Julia's longtime songwriting partner. He and Derek Wills have an acrimonious relationship stemming from a business fallout 11 years ago. Tom briefly dates a Republican lawyer but later becomes attracted to Sam Strickland, a dancer in the ensemble of Bombshell.
  • Megan Hilty as Ivy Lynn,[5] a seasoned performer who, at the beginning of the series, is working in the ensemble of Heaven On Earth, another Broadway musical that Tom and Julia wrote. Ivy is favored by nearly everyone on board with the production to play Marilyn Monroe, but after the workshop flops, she is replaced by Rebecca Duvall. Throughout the show, she is in an on-and-off relationship with the Bombshell director Derek Wills and finds herself constantly competing with Karen in many different situations, eventually losing the role of Marilyn to her for the Boston preview.
  • Raza Jaffrey as Dev Sundaram (Season 1),[5][7] Karen's live-in boyfriend, who works in the office of the New York City mayor's press secretary who ultimately forces her to choose between their relationship or her career. He proposes marriage but when Karen is unsure, a despondent and intoxicated Dev sleeps with Ivy. Upon realizing who Dev is, Ivy tells Karen of their encounter and an angry Karen breaks up with Dev.
  • Jaime Cepero as Ellis Boyd (Season 1),[5][7][8] Tom's and later Eileen's conniving personal assistant who is attempting to receive credit for Bombshell and make his way as a show producer. As the first season continues, Ellis, convinced his suggestion of Marilyn created the show, takes more steps to be recognized as a producer, including giving Rebecca a drink mixed with peanuts, which she is allergic to, in order to remove her as the star. He boasts of this to Eileen as proof of his skills but she responds by firing him.
  • Anjelica Huston as Eileen Rand,[5] the musical's tenacious producer, who is dealing with divorce proceedings from her husband, Jerry, which could threaten the musical and forces her to think outside the box in securing funds for the show. A running gag throughout the series is Eileen throwing drinks into Jerry's face.
  • Brian d'Arcy James as Frank Houston (regular Season 1, guest Season 2),[5][7] Julia's husband and a high-school chemistry teacher, who wishes that Julia would spend more time at home. He was upset when she confessed to her affair with Michael Swift and more so when he confronted Swift and learned Julia had cheated on him earlier in the marriage. They eventually separated in the Season 2 premiere. In the final episode of the program Julia makes good with Frank and both of them go easy on their divorce proceedings. James was credited as guest star in the pilot, but was promoted to regular from episode 2. He made guest appearances in the second-season premiere and the series finale.
  • Jeremy Jordan as Jimmy Collins (Season 2), a working-class man from Brooklyn who is on the brink of self-destruction.[9][10]
  • Leslie Odom, Jr.[11] as Sam Strickland (regular Season 2, recurring Season 1), an ensemble member, a good friend of Ivy who is gay and very much into sports. Due to their mutual friendship with Ivy, he forms a connection with Tom.
  • Krysta Rodriguez as Ana Vargas (Season 2), Karen's new roommate who is looking for her big break.[12]
  • Andy Mientus as Kyle Bishop (Season 2), a poor kid from Brooklyn with dreams of writing for Broadway.[13] He is the writer of the book of Hit List.

Development and production

Conception

Development began in 2009 at Showtime by then-Showtime entertainment president Robert Greenblatt and Steven Spielberg, from an idea by Spielberg, who had been working on the concept for years;[14] Greenblatt, described as a "devoted theater geek", had also produced a musical adaptation of the film 9 to 5 in 2009.[15] The original concept was that each season would follow the production of a new musical; if any of them were "stage-worthy", Spielberg would help produce them as stage productions.[16] The series was inspired by successful TV Dramas The West Wing and Upstairs, Downstairs and used them as role models. Garson Kanin's novel Smash (New York: Viking, 1980) provided the title and setting, although the plots have little in common.[16] As a Showtime show, the script contained a lot of nudity. "It was definitely a cable show," Debra Messing said.[17]

In January 2011, Greenblatt brought the project with him to NBC when he was made NBC Entertainment president. Theresa Rebeck was brought on as showrunner and wrote the pilot script after Executive producers Craig Zadan and Neil Meron suggested her to Spielberg and Greenblatt.[16] NBC ordered production of a pilot in January 2011 for the 2011–12 television season.[18]

Michael Mayer directed the pilot episode, with Spielberg serving as an executive producer.[19] It has been reported that the pilot cost .5 million to produce.[16][20] On May 11, 2011, NBC picked the project up to series. When the network announced its 2011–12 schedule on May 15, 2011, the series was slated to premiere in mid-season.[19] NBC opted to hold the show for mid-season in order to pair it up with the hit reality show The Voice on Monday nights.[21] On August 1, 2011, it was announced by the press that the show's series premiere date would be February 6, 2012, the night after Super Bowl XLVI, with heavy promotion through early winter on many of the network's properties before the premiere.[22][23] At the NBC Press Tour, Greenblatt announced that Smash would have 15 episodes produced for the first season to coincide with The Voice.[24]

Crew

The series is a production of Universal Television in association with DreamWorks.[19]Theresa Rebeck is the creator of the series, as well as the writer of the pilot episode[19] and five of the first season's episodes, including the season finale. The series has a large number of executive producers, including Steven Spielberg, Craig Zadan, Neil Meron, David Marshall Grant, Rebeck, Darryl Frank and Justin Falvey.[19]Marc Shaiman and Scott Wittman serve as the composers and executive producers.[19] In March 2012, Rebeck stepped down as showrunner of the musical drama.[25] On April 24, 2012, The Hollywood Reporter reported that Gossip Girl executive producer Joshua Safran would take the lead for the second season, while Rebeck would remain a writer and an executive producer.[6] However, on May 2, 2012, Rebeck stated in an interview that she would not be returning to the show in any capacity.[26]

Production

Many of those behind Smash began the series with high hopes. Rebeck was a large part of that. As one early hire later described her to BuzzFeed: "She was this kick-ass woman showrunner who wasn't taking shit from the network. Someone who had a very clear vision who was going to stand up to the network. They were all good things in the beginning."[15]

Despite her experience writing and producing in television, Rebeck had never been a showrunner, responsible for the day-to-day operations of a series, before. David Marshall Grant, a playwright and actor who had served in that capacity during Brothers & Sisters' final seasons, was hired as executive producer to help her with it. Rebeck was reportedly resentful, and worried that she was being set up to fail and Grant positioned to replace her. Very quickly she began shutting him out of key decisions.[15]

Rebeck also decided she would not run a "writers' room," i.e., a regular meeting with the entire writing staff to discuss and perfect episodes and plotlines. "[They] really are not my thing, because I can only stand being in a room with people so many hours a day," she told New York. "And I feel like early drafts should be speedy because everyone changes their mind, so why spend a lot of time up front parsing sentences?"[27] Instead she would follow the example of showrunners like Matthew Weiner and Aaron Sorkin and have writers submit a first draft, which she then revised.[15]

Very quickly, the writers recalled, the show became a "dictatorship". Rebeck's opinion was the only one that mattered. She insisted on writing the second and third episodes herself, and writers said that the drop in quality was evident during pre-air screenings. During this time Rebeck was often fighting with Spielberg, who wanted Hilty, Greenblatt, or Grant replaced. As a result of these distractions, plotlines like Julia's adoption dilemma (mirroring Rebeck's real life) began to assume unusual prominence, and along with them secondary characters like Leo and Ellis became almost main characters—the latter because Spielberg reportedly liked him.[15]

Since the writers never met as a group, they found that finished episodes often repeated the same character moments instead of advancing those characters, and that strange out-of-context moments, usually musical numbers set away from the stage, had been inserted. They were particularly frustrated in trying to write for Julia, whom Rebeck had based on herself and consequently would not allow to have any difficulties. Later in the season, they were hoping that Greenblatt would win some of their fights. "You know it's bad when our last hope was the network," one told BuzzFeed. However, many of them said the show's own problems were not entirely Rebeck's fault, since Greenblatt also intervened in things like costume design and Spielberg was not informed of the conflicts until near the end.[15]

After she left the show, Rebeck, who, citing confidentiality requirements, did not respond to the BuzzFeed story at first other than to say she "was treated quite badly",[15] spoke at some length to The New York Observer about Smash:

One of the points of contention last year was that the network thinks they have the right to say to the writer of the show, "We don't want her to do this. We want her to do this ... And I would sometimes say back to them, "She would never do that." And they'd look at me like I was crazy, and I'd be like, "Nope, it's not crazy, it's just who the character is." You have to respect who the character is. It has its own internal truth and you can't betray that. And if you don't betray that, it will not betray you. There is this sort of sense that if you don't fuck with the muse—if you don't fuck with the muse, the muse will stand by you ... It turns into bigger questions about power and art, power and storytelling. Is power itself bigger than storytelling? And I would say no.[28]

Following the show's cancellation, Kate Aurthur, the writer of the BuzzFeed story, reposted an email exchange she had with Rebeck. Pointing to the show's decline in ratings during its second season, Rebeck asked, "If in fact [I] was the problem with [the show], wouldn't things have gotten better—rather than dramatically worse—once [I] left?" She accused Aurthur of relying on a single unnamed source and asked that the story, which she called "wildly untrue", be taken down.[29]

Music

Main article: List of songs in Smash

NBC announced on June 9, 2011, that they had signed a deal with Columbia Records for a soundtrack of the series. The deal gives Columbia worldwide digital and physical rights to the first season, with options to subsequent seasons. The deal includes both original songs written for the series and any covers of songs featured on the show.[30]

The series soundtrack for Season 1, The Music of Smash, was released on May 1, 2012.[30][31] The album debuted on the Billboard 200 at #9, with 40,000 copies sold in its first week.[32]

A Bombshell cast recording, featuring original songs from the first and second season of the show, was released on February 12, 2013, selling 16,000 copies in its first week.[33] It contains all 22 songs written for the fictional Bombshell musical and features lead vocals by Katharine McPhee (Karen Cartwright) and Megan Hilty (Ivy Lynn) as Marilyn Monroe.[34]

In addition to songs by Marc Shaiman and Scott Wittman, the show's second season featured songs by up-and-coming composers Drew Gasparini, Joe Iconis, and writing duo Benj Pasek and Justin Paul.

Several songs were written and performed for the series' Season 2 fictional musical, Hit List. On October 15, 2013, it was announced that Hit List would be staged in concert format at 54 Below on December 9. Smash stars Jeremy Jordan, Andy Mientus, and Krysta Rodriguez were scheduled to perform.[35] Because of demand for tickets, an additional performance was scheduled for December 8.[36]

Bombshell musical numbers

Act I
  • "Let Me Be Your Star" – Norma Jeane Mortenson
  • "At Your Feet" – Gladys, young Norma Jeane, Tourists and Hollywood Citizens
  • "Never Give All the Heart" – Norma Jeane
  • "The 20th Century Fox Mambo" – Marilyn Monroe and Twentieth Century Fox Studio Staff
  • "The National Pastime" – Marilyn and New York Yankees
  • "History is Made at Night" – Marilyn, Joe DiMaggio and Lovers
  • "I Never Met a Wolf Who Didn't Love to Howl" – Marilyn and Troops
  • "Mr. & Mrs. Smith" – Marilyn and Joe DiMaggio
  • "Don't Say Yes Until I Finish Talking" – Darryl F. Zanuck and Studio Executives
  • "Smash!" – Aspiring Actresses
  • "On Lexington & 52nd Street" – Joe DiMaggio, Marilyn, Reporter and New York Citizens
  • "Cut, Print...Moving On" – Marilyn and Studio Staff
Act II
  • "Dig Deep" – Marilyn, Lee Strasberg and Students
  • "Public Relations" – Marilyn and Press
  • "Second Hand White Baby Grand" – Marilyn
  • "They Just Keep Moving the Line" – Marilyn
  • "Let's Be Bad" – Marilyn and the cast of Some Like It Hot
  • "The Right Regrets" – Arthur Miller
  • "Our Little Secret" – John F. Kennedy and Marilyn
  • "Hang the Moon" – Gladys and Marilyn
  • "Don't Forget Me" – Marilyn

Hit List musical numbers

Act I
  • "Broadway Here I Come (Pre-reprise)" — The Diva
  • "Rewrite This Story" — Amanda and Jesse
  • "Good for You" — Amanda
  • "Broadway Here I Come!" — Amanda
  • "The Love I Meant to Say" — Jesse
  • "Reach for Me" — The Diva
  • "Original" — Amanda
  • "The Love I Meant To Say (Reprise)" — Amanda (as "Nina")
  • "I Heard Your Voice In a Dream" — Jesse
  • "Don't Let Me Know" — Amanda (as "Nina") and Jesse
  • "Pretender" — Amanda (as "Nina")
  • "I'm Not Sorry" — Amanda (as "Nina") and The Diva
  • "I Heard Your Voice In a Dream (Reprise)" — Jesse
  • "Caught In the Storm" — Jesse
Act II
  • "[TBD Coming Home Song]" — The Diva (as "Sara Smith")
  • "Good for You" — Amanda (as "Nina")
  • "Heart Shaped Wreckage" — Amanda and Jesse
  • "Broadway Here I Come (Reprise)" — Amanda
  • "The Love I Meant to Say (Reprise)" — Jesse
  • "The Goodbye Song" — Jesse, Amanda, The Diva and Ensemble[37]

Original Broadway production

During production of the show, executive producer Craig Zadan said: "We stand on the set, watch the Bombshell numbers and say, "Wouldn't this be great on Broadway? And so far that's where we've left it. Our priority now is producing a great TV show".[38]

In June 2015, following a sold-out reunion performance at the Minskoff Theatre, it was announced that Bombshell would head to the Broadway stage. The executive producers of Smash and the Bombshell concert, Neil Meron and Craig Zadan, were set to executive produce the Broadway production. No timeline for the show has been announced.[39]

In May 2020, shortly after a virtual cast reunion during a live-streamed concert, it was announced that a musical based solely on the plot of the series was in the works for a Broadway production. Spielberg, Greenblatt, and Meron are all attached as producers, with Bob Martin and Rick Elice penning the book to Wittman and Shaiman's score, and Bergasse returning to choreograph.[40] Of the announcement, Spielberg stated, "Smash is near and dear to my heart, and it seems fitting that a new musical inspired by what we did on the show would eventually come to the stage. I'm beyond thrilled to be working with this incredible creative team and my producing partners, who began the Smash journey with me over 10 years ago."[41]

Critical reception

The pilot of Smash received positive reviews from television critics, but the critical response was less positive as the season progressed.

Review aggregator Metacritic, which assigns a normalized rating out of 100 of reviews from mainstream critics, calculated a score of 79 based on 32 reviews.[42] Maureen Ryan of The Huffington Post called it one of the strongest new shows of the season.[43]The Huffington Post writer Karen Ocamb praised the writing and the creativity of the series.[44] Mary McNamara of the Los Angeles Times called the show a "triumph" and said creator Theresa Rebeck as well as her team "have managed to capture the grand and sweeping gesture that is musical theater and inject it with the immediate intimacy of television."[45]David Wiegand of the San Francisco Chronicle gave the program a rave review: "[It's so] good you can't help wondering why no one thought of it before, a compelling mix of credible real-life melodrama with a fictionalized approximation of what it takes to get a Broadway show from the idea stage to opening night."[46] Tim Goodman from The Hollywood Reporter called the pilot episode "Excellent, a bar-raiser for broadcast networks", and superior to Glee.[47] He also praised writing and acting for the series, comparing it to the quality of a cable television series.[47] Matt Mitovich of TVLine called the cast "pretty damn perfect" and complimented the musical numbers.[48] Robert Bianco of USA Today gave the show three and a half out of four stars and wrote, "Unless you're allergic to musicals in general and Broadway in particular, you should find that a compelling central story, a strong cast, an out-of-the-procedural-mold premise and some rousing, roof-raising numbers more than compensate for any lingering problems."[49] Tanner Stransky of Entertainment Weekly ranked the pilot episode as the 8th best television episode of 2012, saying, "After we watched the subsequent 14 episodes of Smash with a mixture of fascination and dismay (seriously, did Debra Messing's Julia wear a men's pajama top to meet her lover?), it was difficult to recall that the pilot was positively magical. But it was. In fact, that episode-ending performance of 'Let Me Be Your Star' (featuring dueling divas Megan Hilty and Katharine McPhee) was among TV's most watchable and gleeful three minutes of the year. Rare is the series whose high-water mark is its pilot, and Smash is a shining example."[50]

Chris Harnick of The Huffington Post wrote, "How has the rest of Season 1 been so far? Not so phenomenal. That's not to say it has been downright terrible—there have been some highly entertaining moments—but it certainly hasn't been goosebumps-inducing, like the final moments of Episode 1, set to 'Let Me Be Your Star.'"[51] Kevin Fallon summed up the response in The Atlantic, writing that "there's been an almost visceral reaction to how rapidly and sharply the show's quality has dipped, and just how much promise Smash has thwarted...In other words: It's bad." Fallon cites other critics in demonstrating the general acceptance of this opinion.[52]

Awards and nominations

Smash received a number of awards and nominations. In 2012, it was nominated for four Primetime Emmy Awards, winning one for Choreography.

Year Award Category Recipient Result
2011 Critics' Choice Television Award Most Exciting New Series Won
2012 Primetime Emmy Award[53][54] Outstanding Guest Actress in a Drama Series Uma Thurman Nominated
Outstanding Choreography Josh Bergasse Won
Outstanding Music Composition for a Series Marc Shaiman (Original Music) & Christian Bacon (Score) Nominated
Outstanding Original Music and Lyrics Marc Shaiman & Scott Wittman
("Let Me Be Your Star")
Nominated
Teen Choice Award Choice TV Breakout Show Nominated
Choice TV Breakout Female Star Katharine McPhee Nominated
Television Critics Association Award Outstanding New Program Nominated
Women's Image Network Awards Best Drama Series Won
Best Actress in a Drama Series Katharine McPhee Won
Debra Messing Nominated
2013 American Cinema Editors Award[55] Best Edited One-Hour Series for Commercial Television Andrew Weisblum ("Pilot") Nominated
Dorian Award[56][57] LGBT TV Show of the Year Nominated
Campy TV Show of the Year Nominated
TV Musical Performance of the Year Katharine McPhee & Megan Hilty
("Let Me Be Your Star")
Nominated
Katharine McPhee, Raza Jaffrey & cast
("A Thousand and One Nights")
Nominated
Golden Globe Award Best Television Series – Musical or Comedy Nominated
Grammy Award Best Song Written for Visual Media "Let Me Be Your Star"
(Marc Shaiman & Scott Wittman)
Nominated
GLAAD Media Awards[58][59] Outstanding Drama Series Won
CDG Awards[60][61] Outstanding Contemporary Television Series Molly Maginnis Won
MPSE Golden Reel Award[62] Best Sound Editing: Short Form Musical in Television Dan Evan Farkas, Annette Kudrak and Robert Cotnoir MPSE ("Hell on Earth") Won
Society of Operating Cameramen[63] Camera Operator of the Year in Television Jeff Muhlstock Nominated
Primetime Emmy Award[64] Outstanding Original Music and Lyrics Marc Shaiman & Scott Wittman
("Hang the Moon")
Nominated
Andrew McMahon
("I Heard Your Voice In a Dream")
Nominated

Pre-release

In June 2011, Smash was one of eight honorees in the "Most Exciting New Series" category at the 1st Critics' Choice Television Awards, voted by journalists who had seen the pilots.[65] Due to the already positive buzz surrounding the show,[citation needed] NBC offered early viewings of the pilot on different platforms. From January 15 through January 30, 2012, it was screened on selected flights of American Airlines.[citation needed] From January 16 through February 6, 2012, the full pilot was offered for free on iTunes, Amazon Video, Xbox, and Zune.[citation needed]

Ratings

The ratings for the Season 1 premiere were strong but ratings steadily dropped as the series progressed. The pilot episode was watched by 11.44 million viewers and had an 18–49 rating of 3.8/10.[66][67] It was also the third-highest-rated new drama debut of the 2011–2012 television season (behind Once Upon a Time and Touch)[68] and "delivered the biggest 10 p.m. rating of any drama in this television season", according to Entertainment Weekly.[69] The program also had the highest 18–49 rating and viewership for an NBC series in the time slot since November 2008,[70] but ratings declined in subsequent episodes. The fourth episode, aired on February 27, was seen by 6.6 million viewers and received a 2.3/6 rating in the 18–49 age group.[71] However, the show's fifth episode, aired on March 5, saw a 17% increase in ratings. It had an 18–49 rating of 2.7/7 and was seen by 7.76 million viewers.[72] But ratings for the show decreased in later episodes, with the eighth episode dropping to an 18–49 rating of 2.1/5 and viewership going down to 6.4 million viewers.[73] Nonetheless, it became NBC's #1 drama in adults 18–49 and total viewers.[74] The series was also up 160 percent in adults 18–49 versus NBC's season average in the time period prior to Smash (with a 2.6 rating vs. a 1.0, "live plus same day") and in total viewers, Smash has improved the time period by 100 percent (7.7 million vs. 3.9 million).[75]

For Season 2, Smash was scheduled for Tuesdays at 10 at mid-season starting February 5, behind the low-rated The New Normal and several weeks before the new season of The Voice premiered, and the ratings cratered, with the February 5, 2013 2-hour 2-episode season premiere getting a 1.2 rating in the 18–49 demo. The ratings slid further to 0.9 for the 3rd episode and stayed around that number through the sixth episode, when NBC announced it was moving Smash to Saturdays as of April 6, 2013 and changing up its Tuesday lineup to put its dating reality show Ready for Love behind The Voice.[76]

Season Timeslot (ET) Season premiere Season finale Rank Viewers
(in millions)
Viewers High
(in millions)
Viewers Low
(in millions)
18–49 Average 18–49 High 18–49 Low Ref
1 Monday 10:00 p.m. February 6, 2012 May 14, 2012 #51 8.94 11.44 5.34 3.2 3.8 1.8 [77]
2 Tuesday 10:00 p.m.
(February 5 – April 2, 2013)
Saturday 9:00 p.m.
(April 6, 2013)[1]
Saturday 8:00 p.m.
(April 13 – May 11, 2013)
Sunday 9:00 p.m.
(May 26, 2013)[78]
February 5, 2013 May 26, 2013 #113 2.72 4.48 1.80 1.4 1.2 0.4 [79]

Syndication

Ovation has picked up off-network rights to Smash. The first season debuted on July 19, 2013. Season 2 episodes, scheduled to begin airing in November 2013, were pushed back to January 2014.[80]

DVD releases

The first season of Smash was released under the title Smash: Season One as a widescreen four-disc DVD box set on October 29, 2012, formatted for Region 2. The DVD formatted for Region 1 was released on January 8, 2013. Distributed by Universal Studios Home Entertainment, the set features every episode and includes several DVD extras including behind-the-scenes footage and making-of features as well as extended and deleted scenes and a blooper reel. Also included is an UltraViolet copy of each episode.[81]

The Target exclusive edition of the Season 1 set includes a fifth disc that includes the full-length music video for "Touch Me" performed by Katharine McPhee, as well as twenty minutes of additional interviews with Jack Davenport (Derek Wills) and Megan Hilty (Ivy Lynn).

Season 2 was released on DVD on August 6, 2013.[82]

References

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  36. ^ Gioia, Michael (November 1, 2013). "54 Below Adds Dec. 8 Hit List Concert, Based on Fictional 'Smash' Musical". Playbill. Retrieved June 5, 2021.
  37. ^ The Unspoken Full Plot for Smash's 'Hit List' Musical Is Revealed
  38. ^ Hinckley, David (January 7, 2013). "'Smash' producers: 'Bombshell,' musical within the musical series, could still end up on Broadway". New York Daily News.
  39. ^ Hetrick, Adam (June 22, 2015). "'Smash' Musical Bombshell Headed to the Stage". Playbill. Retrieved December 2, 2015.
  40. ^ Coleman, Nancy (May 21, 2020). "'Smash,' NBC's Short-Lived Musical Drama, Eyes the Stage". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved May 24, 2020.
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  42. ^ "Smash – Season 1". Metacritic. Retrieved February 2, 2012.
  43. ^ Ryan, Maureen (November 21, 2011). "'Smash' Exclusive First Look: Is This the Show That Will Save NBC?". HuffPost TV. Archived from the original on January 26, 2012. Retrieved February 7, 2012.
  44. ^ Ocamb, Karen (January 17, 2012). "Karen Ocamb: NBC's Smash Is a Musical About Creativity and the Drama of Big Dreams". The Huffington Post. Retrieved February 7, 2012.
  45. ^ McNamara, Mary (February 6, 2012). "Television review: 'Smash' on NBC". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved February 7, 2012.
  46. ^ Wiegand, David (February 1, 2012). "'Smash' review: NBC series lives up to title". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved March 27, 2012.
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  52. ^ Fallon, Kevin (April 10, 2012). "The TV Musical is Dead". The Atlantic. Retrieved April 10, 2012.
  53. ^ 2012 Emmy Nominations Press Release (PDF). Emmys.com. p. 7. Retrieved March 30, 2013.
  54. ^ 2012 Creative Arts Emmy Winners Press Release (PDF). Emmys.com. September 15, 2012. p. 20. Retrieved March 30, 2013.
  55. ^ Mike Fleming, Jr (January 11, 2013). "63rd ACE Awards: Best Pic Noms 'Argo,' 'Life Of Pi,' 'Lincoln' 'Zero Dark Thirty,' 'Les Miserables' And 'Silver Linings Playbook' Make Cut For Editing". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved March 30, 2013.
  56. ^ Kilday, Gregg (January 9, 2013). "Gay and Lesbian Entertainment Critics Announce Dorian Award Nominees". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved March 30, 2013.
  57. ^ Kilday, Gregg (January 18, 2013). "'Argo' Named Best Film by Gay and Lesbian Entertainment Critics Association". Yahoo! Movies. Retrieved March 30, 2013.
  58. ^ "2013 GLAAD Media Award Nominees Unveiled". Deadline Hollywood. January 16, 2013. Retrieved March 30, 2013.
  59. ^ Townsend, Megan (March 16, 2013). "Smash, How to Survive a Plague among GLAAD Media Award Recipients in New York". GLAAD.org. Retrieved March 30, 2013.
  60. ^ "Costume Designers Unveil CDG Awards Nominees". Deadline Hollywood. January 17, 2013. Retrieved March 30, 2013.
  61. ^ "Costume Designers Guild Awards: Jacqueline Durran Wins For 'Anna Karenina', Eiko Ishioka For 'Mirror Mirror', Jany Temime For 'Skyfall'; TV Winners 'Smash', 'AHS: Asylum', 'Downton Abbey'". Deadline Hollywood. February 20, 2013. Retrieved March 30, 2013.
  62. ^ "2013 Golden Reel Award Winners & Nominees: Television". mpse.org. Retrieved March 30, 2013.
  63. ^ Eng, David (March 10, 2013). "Society of Camera Operators Awards 2013 – Winners". chinokino.com. Retrieved March 30, 2013.
  64. ^ "2013 Primetime Emmy Award Nominations" (PDF). emmys.com. July 18, 2013. Retrieved July 18, 2013.
  65. ^ Andreeva, Nellie (June 9, 2011). "Critics' Choice Awards Honors 8 New Shows". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved June 10, 2011.
  66. ^ Fienberg, Daniel (February 7, 2012). "TV Ratings: Huge 'Voice,' OK 'Smash' premiere lead NBC Monday rout". HitFix. Archived from the original on January 23, 2013. Retrieved August 6, 2014.
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  69. ^ Valby, Karen (February 7, 2012). "'Smash' starts solid; 'Voice' tops Monday ratings". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved March 27, 2012.
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  79. ^ Complete List Of 2012–13 Season TV Show Ratings: 'Sunday Night Football' Tops, Followed By 'The Big Bang Theory,' 'The Voice' & 'Modern Family' Retrieved May 29, 2013
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External links

  • Official website Edit this at Wikidata
  • Smash at IMDb Edit this at Wikidata
Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Smash_(TV_series)&oldid=1057807632"
Smash - NBC.com

Watch full episodes. Smash brings you the blood, sweat, and tears of the making of a Broadway musical.

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Smash (TV Series 2012–2013)

Smash: Created by Theresa Rebeck. With Debra Messing, Jack Davenport, Katharine McPhee, Christian Borle. More drama occurs behind the scenes than on stage, as the team prepares an ambitious Broadway musical on the life of Marilyn Monroe.

For a Broadway musical, the road to success is not easy. And winning the coveted Tony as Best Musical, which is the ultimate goal, is even more difficult. Such trials and tribulations are shown for a handful of shows, their creative teams and their performers. There is competition amongst the performers for roles, competition amongst the shows not only for box office but also limited investor dollars and that final Tony prize, and competition amongst those ultimately hired in the cast and crew for what they want to see happen in the show, both for the good of the show and their own personal benefit. And sometimes, personal life gets in the way of these professional goals. These problems not only happen for those new or working their ways up the ranks, such as performers Karen Cartwright and Ivy Lynn, and the writing team of Jimmy Collins and Kyle Bishop, but also seasoned veterans, such as the writing team of Tom Levitt and Julia Houston, womanizing director Derek Wills, and producer Eileen Rand. —Huggo
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Anjelica Huston, Debra Messing, Jack Davenport, Christian Borle, Leslie Odom Jr., Jennifer Hudson, Katharine McPhee, Megan Hilty, Jeremy Jordan, Krysta Rodriguez, and Andy Mientus in Smash (2012)
What is the Spanish language plot outline for Smash (2012)?
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  • When did smash first appear on TV?

    Smash is an American musical television show that premiered on NBC, Monday, February 6, 2012. It was announced on June 9, 2011, that NBC had signed a deal with Columbia Records for a soundtrack of the series. The deal gave Columbia worldwide, digital and physical rights to the first season, with options to subsequent seasons.
    Wikimedia list article

    Smash is an American musical television show that premiered on NBC, Monday, February 6, 2012.[1][2][3]

    It was announced on June 9, 2011, that NBC had signed a deal with Columbia Records for a soundtrack of the series. The deal gave Columbia worldwide, digital and physical rights to the first season, with options to subsequent seasons. The deal included both original songs written for the series and any covers of songs featured on the show.[4]

    By the end of the first season, 36 studio recordings of the show's musical performances were released, 31 of them on iTunes[5] and five with the deluxe edition of the first season soundtrack.

    The first season soundtrack, The Music of Smash, was released on May 1, 2012.[6] A deluxe edition,[7] with additional songs, was available exclusively from Target until early 2013.

    A second soundtrack album from the show, Bombshell, which serves as the "cast album" for Bombshell, the main show-within-the-show, was released on February 12, 2013, in standard[8] and deluxe versions,[9] the latter again exclusively from Target.

    A third soundtrack album, The Music of Smash: The Complete Season 1, was released digitally exclusively by iTunes on May 21, 2013.[10] It consists of 36 songs that had been previously released for Season 1, either as singles or on the previous soundtrack albums, including the deluxe Target edition of The Music of Smash (which is currently out of print).

    A fourth soundtrack album, The Music of Smash: The Complete Season 2, was released digitally exclusively by iTunes on May 21, 2013.[11] It consists of 51 songs from the second season, including three that hadn't previously been released during the season.

    Performers

    Season 1

    Most songs in the first season are performed by the cast of Bombshell, which consistently includes Karen Cartwright (Katharine McPhee) and Ivy Lynn (Megan Hilty), and, at times, Michael Swift (Will Chase) and Rebecca Duvall (Uma Thurman). Other main characters to sing include Tom Levitt (Christian Borle), Dev Sundaram (Raza Jaffrey), Frank Houston (Brian d'Arcy James), Ellis Boyd (Jaime Cepero), and Eileen Rand (Anjelica Huston). Julia Houston (Debra Messing) and Derek Wills (Jack Davenport) have each been featured in choreography. Minor cast members, such as Sam Strickland (Leslie Odom, Jr.), have given performances as well. Various guest stars have appeared in the series, many of them giving vocal performances. These have included Nick Jonas as television star Lyle West, Bernadette Peters as Ivy's mother Leigh Conroy, Annaleigh Ashford as Lisa McMann, and Norbert Leo Butz as himself.

    Season 2

    Many of the same characters from the first season deliver performances in the show's second season, again with Karen Cartwright (Katharine McPhee) and Ivy Lynn (Megan Hilty) being the notable leads. Other vocal performers include Veronica Moore (Jennifer Hudson), Jimmy Collins (Jeremy Jordan), Kyle Bishop (Andy Mientus), Ana Vargas (Krysta Rodriguez), Leigh Conroy (Bernadette Peters), Tom Levitt (Christian Borle), Julia Houston (Debra Messing), Sam Strickland (Leslie Odom, Jr.), Terry Falls (Sean Hayes), Simon as JFK (Julian Ovenden), Daisy Parker (Mara Davi), unnamed actress playing young Marilyn (Sophia Caruso) and ensemble members Bobby (Wesley Taylor) and Jessica (Savannah Wise). Liza Minnelli and Kathie Lee Gifford played themselves in cameos.

    Songs

    See also: Original songs in Smash

    Season 1

    In the first season, all original songs contain music and lyrics by Marc Shaiman and Scott Wittman, except one where indicated.

    List of songs in Smash
    Title Version covered Composer(s) for originals Performed by Episode Single Album
    "Over the Rainbow" The Wizard of Oz N/A Karen Cartwright 1. "Pilot" No N/A
    "Never Give All the Heart" Original Marc Shaiman & Scott Wittman Ivy Lynn 1. "Pilot" No Bombshell
    (Deluxe version) & Smash: Season 2
    Karen 10. "Understudy" Yes Bombshell & Smash: Season 1
    "The National Pastime" Original Shaiman & Wittman Ivy & Audition Dancers 1. "Pilot"
    7. "The Workshop"
    Yes Bombshell & Smash: Season 1
    "I Wanna Be Loved by You" Marilyn Monroe N/A Lisa McMann 1. "Pilot" No N/A
    "Beautiful" Christina Aguilera N/A Karen 1. "Pilot" Yes The Music of Smash & Smash: Season 1
    "Happy Birthday, Mr. President" Marilyn Monroe N/A 1. "Pilot"
    5. "Let's Be Bad"
    No N/A
    Rebecca Duvall 13. "Tech" No N/A
    "Let Me Be Your Star" Original Shaiman & Wittman Karen & Ivy 1. "Pilot"
    2. "The Callback"
    7. "The Workshop"
    Yes The Music of Smash,
    Bombshell (Extended intro version), Smash: Season 1, Smash: Season 2
    Ivy 6. "Chemistry" No N/A
    Rebecca 11. "The Movie Star"
    14. "Previews"
    No N/A
    "Call Me" Blondie N/A Karen 2. "The Callback" Yes Smash: Season 1
    "The 20th Century Fox Mambo" Original Shaiman & Wittman Karen & Bombshell ensemble members 2. "The Callback"
    7. "The Workshop"
    15. "Bombshell"
    Yes The Music of Smash, Bombshell, Smash: Season 1
    Ivy & Bombshell ensemble members 4. "The Cost of Art"
    7. "The Workshop"
    No N/A
    "Crazy Dreams" Carrie Underwood N/A Ivy 2. "The Callback" Yes The Music of Smash, Smash: Season 1
    "Grenade" Bruno Mars N/A Michael Swift & the Bruno Mars jukebox musical cast 3. "Enter Mr. DiMaggio" Yes Smash: Season 1
    "Redneck Woman" Gretchen Wilson N/A Karen & the karaoke bar patrons 3. "Enter Mr. DiMaggio" Yes Smash: Season 1
    "Mr. & Mrs. Smith" Original Shaiman & Wittman Ivy & Michael 3. "Enter Mr. DiMaggio" Yes The Music of Smash, Bombshell & Smash: Season 1
    Rebecca & Michael 14. "Previews" No N/A
    Karen & Michael 15. "Bombshell" No N/A
    "History is Made at Night" Original Shaiman & Wittman Ivy, Karen & the Bombshell cast 4. "The Cost of Art" No N/A
    Ivy, Michael & the Bombshell cast 6. "Chemistry"
    7. "The Workshop"
    Yes The Music of Smash, Bombshell & Smash: Season 1
    Ivy & Bobby 13. "Tech" No N/A
    "Haven't Met You Yet" Michael Bublé N/A Lyle West 4. "The Cost of Art" Yes The Music of Smash & Smash: Season 1
    "I Never Met a Wolf Who Didn't Love to Howl" Original Shaiman & Wittman Ivy, Julia Houston, Ellis Boyd, Michael, Lyle & Lyle's party patrons 4. "The Cost of Art" Yes Bombshell & Smash: Season 1
    Karen & male ensemble members of Bombshell 15. "Bombshell" No N/A
    "Rumour Has It" Adele N/A Karen, Sue, Jessica, & Bobby 4. "The Cost of Art" No N/A
    "Let's Be Bad" Original Shaiman & Wittman Ivy & the Bombshell cast 5. "Let's Be Bad" Yes The Music of Smash, Bombshell & Smash: Season 1
    "It's a Man's Man's Man's World" James Brown N/A Karen 5. "Let's Be Bad" Yes Smash: Season 1
    "A Song for You" Donny Hathaway N/A Michael 5. "Let's Be Bad" Yes Smash: Season 1
    "Who You Are" Jessie J N/A Ivy 6. "Chemistry" No The Music of Smash & Smash: Season 1
    "Shake It Out" Florence + the Machine N/A Karen 6. "Chemistry" No The Music of Smash & Smash: Season 1
    "Brighter Than the Sun" Colbie Caillat N/A Karen 7. "The Workshop" No The Music of Smash & Smash: Season 1
    "Everything's Coming Up Roses" Gypsy N/A Leigh Conroy 7. "The Workshop" No The Music of Smash (Deluxe version) & Smash: Season 1
    "On Lexington & 52nd Street" Original Shaiman & Wittman Michael 7. "The Workshop" Yes Bombshell & Smash: Season 1
    "Touch Me" Original Ryan Tedder, Brent Kutzle, Bonnie McKee, & Noel Zancanella Karen 8. "The Coup" Yes The Music of Smash & Smash: Season 1
    "Three Little Birds" Bob Marley & the Wailers N/A Frank Houston 8. "The Coup" No N/A
    "Dance to the Music" Sly & the Family Stone N/A Jessica, Dennis, Bobby, Sam Strickland & Ivy 8. "The Coup" Yes Smash: Season 1
    "The Higher You Get, the Farther the Fall" Original Shaiman & Wittman Norbert Leo Butz & the Heaven on Earth cast 9. "Hell on Earth" No N/A
    "Arthur Miller Melody"[B] Original Shaiman & Wittman Frank 9. "Hell on Earth" No N/A
    "Cheers (Drink to That)" Rihanna N/A Karen & Ivy 9. "Hell on Earth" Yes Smash: Season 1
    "Breakaway" Kelly Clarkson N/A Ivy 10. "Understudy" No The Music of Smash (Deluxe version) & Smash: Season 1
    "Don't Say Yes Until I Finish Talking" Original Shaiman & Wittman Tom Levitt & Bombshell male ensemble members 10. "Understudy" Yes Bombshell & Smash: Season 1
    Marc Kudisch & Bombshell male ensemble members 14. "Previews" No N/A
    "Three On a Match" Original Shaiman & Wittman The Three on a Match high school cast 10. "Understudy" No N/A
    "Our Day Will Come" Ruby & the Romantics N/A Karen 11. "The Movie Star" No The Music of Smash
    (Deluxe version) & Smash: Season 1
    "Dig Deep" Original Shaiman & Wittman Rebecca & the Bombshell cast 11. "The Movie Star" Yes Smash: Season 1
    "Run" Snow Patrol N/A Karen 12. "Publicity" No The Music of Smash
    (Deluxe version) & Smash: Season 1
    "A Thousand and One Nights" Original Shaiman & Wittman Karen, Dev Sundaram & Ensemble 12. "Publicity" Yes Smash: Season 1
    "Second Hand White Baby Grand" Original Shaiman & Wittman Ivy 12. "Publicity" Yes Bombshell & Smash: Season 1
    Rebecca 14. "Previews" No N/A
    "Another Op'nin', Another Show" Kiss Me, Kate N/A Tom & Sam 13. "Tech" No N/A
    "I'm Going Down" Rose Royce N/A Ivy 13. "Tech" Yes Smash: Season 1
    "Smash!" Original Shaiman & Wittman Karen, Ivy, Sue, Jessica & Bombshell female ensemble members 14. "Previews" Yes Bombshell & Smash: Season 1
    "September Song" Knickerbocker Holiday N/A Eileen Rand 14. "Previews" No The Music of Smash
    (Deluxe version) & Smash: Season 1
    "Stand" Donnie McClurkin N/A Sam, Karen & gospel choir 14. "Previews" No The Music of Smash & Smash: Season 1
    "Don't Forget Me" Original Shaiman & Wittman Karen 15. "Bombshell" Yes Bombshell & Smash: Season 1

    Season 2

    The second season features original music from four different fictional musicals, Bombshell, Beautiful, Hit List and Liaisons, as well as ancillary songs written by the fictional songwriters behind Bombshell and Hit List. All of the songs have music and lyrics by Wittman and Shaiman, except for the songs from Hit List, which for the most part were written by a combination of other musical theater writers and contemporary rock singer-songwriters. The use of additional songwriters was done in part to "open up the sound" of Smash.[12]

    List of songs in Smash
    Title Version covered Composer(s) for originals Performed by Episode Single Album
    "Cut, Print...Moving On" Original Marc Shaiman & Scott Wittman Karen Cartwright 1. "On Broadway" Yes Bombshell & Smash: Season 2
    "Mama Makes Three" Original Shaiman & Wittman Veronica Moore & the Beautiful cast 1. "On Broadway" Yes Smash: Season 2
    "Let Me Be Your Star" (Reprise) Original Shaiman & Wittman Karen, Jessica, Beth & Joy 1. "On Broadway" No N/A
    Ivy Lynn 8. "The Bells and Whistles"
    11. "The Dress Rehearsal"
    No N/A
    "On Broadway" The Drifters N/A Karen & Veronica 1. "On Broadway" Yes Smash: Season 2
    "Don't Dream It's Over" Crowded House N/A Ivy 1. "On Broadway" No Smash: Season 2
    "Broadway, Here I Come!" Original Joe Iconis[13] Jimmy Collins 1. "On Broadway" Yes Smash: Season 2
    Karen 9. "The Parents"
    13. "The Producers"
    14. "The Phenomenon"
    No N/A
    Ana Vargas 11. "The Dress Rehearsal"
    13. "The Producers"
    No N/A
    Karen, Jimmy, Ana, Sam Strickland & Hit List ensemble 17. "The Tonys" No Smash: Season 2
    "Would I Lie to You" Eurythmics N/A Karen & Ivy 2. "The Fallout" No Smash: Season 2
    "They Just Keep Moving the Line" Original Shaiman & Wittman Ivy 2. "The Fallout" No Bombshell & Smash: Season 2
    Karen & Bombshell ensemble members 3. "The Dramaturg" No N/A
    "Caught in the Storm" Original Pasek & Paul[14] Karen 2. "The Fallout" Yes Smash: Season 2
    Jimmy 5. "The Read-Through" No N/A
    "Good for You" Original Drew Gasparini[15] Karen 3. "The Dramaturg" Yes Smash: Season 2
    "Soon As I Get Home" The Wiz N/A Veronica 3. "The Dramaturg" No N/A
    "Dancing on My Own" Robyn N/A Ivy 3. "The Dramaturg" Yes Smash: Season 2
    "Our Little Secret" Original Shaiman & Wittman Simon & Karen 3. "The Dramaturg" No Bombshell & Smash: Season 2
    Simon & Ivy 11. "The Dress Rehearsal" No N/A
    "I Got Love" Purlie N/A Veronica 4. "The Song" Yes Smash: Season 2
    "I'm Not Lost" (partial) Original Shaiman & Wittman[A] Jimmy 4. "The Song" No N/A
    "Chest of Broken Hearts" (partial) Original Shaiman & Wittman[A] Karen 4. "The Song" No N/A
    "Everybody Loves You Now" Billy Joel N/A Kyle Bishop & Veronica 4. "The Song" No Smash: Season 2
    "I Can't Let Go" Original Shaiman & Wittman Veronica, Karen & Ivy 4. "The Song" Yes Smash: Season 2
    "Public Relations" Original Shaiman & Wittman Karen, Tom Levitt & Bombshell ensemble members 5. "The Read-Through" No Bombshell & Smash: Season 2
    "Some Boys" Death Cab for Cutie N/A Karen 5. "The Read-Through Yes Smash: Season 2
    "This Will Be Our Year" The Zombies N/A Jimmy, Kyle, Karen & Ana 6. "The Fringe" Yes N/A
    "Never Give All the Heart" (Reprise) Original Shaiman & Wittman Karen & Bombshell ensemble members 6. "The Fringe" No N/A
    "A Letter From Cecile" Original Shaiman & Wittman Ivy 6. "The Fringe" Yes Smash: Season 2
    "Heart Shaped Wreckage" Original Julian Emery, Jon Green, Jim Irvin & Lucie Silvas[16] Karen & Jimmy 6. "The Fringe" Yes Smash: Season 2
    Ana & Jimmy 7. "Musical Chairs" No N/A
    "The National Pastime" (Reprise) Original Shaiman & Wittman Karen & Bombshell ensemble members 7. "Musical Chairs" No N/A
    "Ce N'Est Pas Ma Faute (It's Not My Fault)" Original Shaiman & Wittman Terrence Falls & Liaisons ensemble members 7. "Musical Chairs" Yes Smash: Season 2
    "Rewrite This Story" Original Pasek & Paul[14] Karen & Jimmy 7. "Musical Chairs"
    13. "The Producers"
    Yes Smash: Season 2
    Sam 13. "The Producers" No N/A
    Karen 16. "The Nominations" No N/A
    "(Let's Start) Tomorrow Tonight" Original Shaiman & Wittman Sam, Tom, Bobby, & Jessica 8. "The Bells and Whistles" No Bombshell & Smash: Season 2
    "I Heard Your Voice In a Dream" Original Andrew McMahon[17] Karen, Jimmy & Hit List ensemble members 8. "The Bells and Whistles Yes Smash: Season 2
    "If I Were a Boy" Beyoncé N/A Ana 8. "The Bells and Whistles" Yes Smash: Season 2
    "Reach for Me" Original McMahon[18] Ana 9. "The Parents" Yes Smash: Season 2
    "Hang the Moon" Original Shaiman & Wittman Leigh Conroy & Ivy 9. "The Parents" No Bombshell & Smash: Season 2
    "Original" Original Pasek & Paul[A] Karen 10. "The Surprise Party" Yes Smash: Season 2
    "A Love Letter From the Times" Original Shaiman & Wittman Tom & Liza Minnelli 10. "The Surprise Party" Yes Smash: Season 2
    "Bittersweet Symphony" The Verve N/A Ivy 10. "The Surprise Party" Yes Smash: Season 2
    "Dig Deep" (Reprise) Original Shaiman & Wittman Ivy 11. "The Dress Rehearsal" No Bombshell & Smash: Season 2
    "Don't Forget Me" (Reprise) Original Shaiman & Wittman Ivy 12. "Opening Night" Yes Smash: Season 2
    "That's Life" Frank Sinatra N/A Karen & Ivy 12. "Opening Night" Yes Smash: Season 2
    "The 20th Century Fox Mambo" (Reprise) Original Shaiman & Wittman Ivy & Kathie Lee Gifford 13. "The Producers" No N/A
    "Don't Let Me Know" Original Silvas & Jamie Alexander Hartman[19] Karen & Jimmy 13. "The Producers" Yes Smash: Season 2
    "The Goodbye Song" Original Iconis[20] Jimmy, Karen, Ana & the Hit List cast 13. "The Producers" Yes Smash: Season 2
    "The Last Goodbye" Jeff Buckley N/A Kyle 13. "The Producers" Yes Smash: Season 2
    "High and Dry" Radiohead N/A Jimmy 14. "The Phenomenon" Yes Smash: Season 2
    "Vienna" Billy Joel N/A Tom 14. "The Phenomenon" Yes Smash: Season 2
    "At Your Feet" Original Shaiman & Wittman Leigh & young Norma Jeane 14. "The Phenomenon" No Bombshell & Smash: Season 2
    "The Love I Meant to Say" Original Shaiman & Wittman Jimmy 14. "The Phenomenon" Yes Smash: Season 2
    "Pretender" Original Silvas & Busbee[21] Karen 15. "The Transfer" Yes Smash: Season 2
    "Grin and Bare It" Original Shaiman & Wittman Ivy 15. "The Transfer" Yes Smash: Season 2
    "I'm Not Sorry" Original McMahon[22] Karen & Daisy Parker 15. "The Transfer" Yes Smash: Season 2
    "The Right Regrets" Original Shaiman & Wittman Julia Houston & Tom 15. "The Transfer" No Bombshell & Smash: Season 2
    "Feelin' Alright" Traffic N/A Ivy 16. "The Nominations" No Smash: Season 2
    "If You Want Me" Once N/A Ana 16. "The Nominations" No N/A
    "Under Pressure" Queen & David Bowie N/A Ivy, Karen, Jimmy, Ana, Tom, Julia, Eileen Rand, Derek Wills & Sam 17. "The Tonys" No Smash: Season 2
    "Big Finish" Original Shaiman & Wittman Karen & Ivy[23] 17. "The Tonys No Smash: Season 2

    Notes

    • A ^ From episode credits
    • B ^ From the sheet music during the episode

    Digital singles sales

    Song Sales
    Let Me Be Your Star 48,000[24]
    Touch Me 18,000[25]
    Beautiful 15,000[26]
    That's Life 12,000[27]
    I Can't Let Go 11,000[28]
    Heart Shaped Wreckage 11,000[29]
    I Heard Your Voice in a Dream 10,000[30]

    References

    1. ^ Seidman, Robert (August 1, 2011). "It's Official: NBC Premieres Second Season of 'The Voice' After Super Bowl; 'Smash' Premieres Next Day". TV by the Numbers. Archived from the original on September 10, 2011. Retrieved August 1, 2011.
    2. ^ Morabito, Andrea (May 11, 2011). "NBC Orders Pilots 'Smash,' 'Whitney,' More". Broadcasting & Cable. Retrieved June 10, 2011.
    3. ^ Andreeva, Nellie (May 15, 2011). "NBC Unveils 2011–2012 Primetime Schedule". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved June 10, 2011.
    4. ^ Andreeva, Nellie (June 9, 2011). "Columbia Records Teams With NBC For 'Smash' Music Albums, Inks Solo Recording Deal With Co-Star Katharine McPhee". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved June 10, 2011.
    5. ^ "iTunes – Music – SMASH Cast". Itunes.apple.com. Retrieved June 8, 2012.
    6. ^ "The Music of SMASH". Amazon. Retrieved February 16, 2013.
    7. ^ SC Soundtrack Smash Deluxe Exclusive (May 1, 2012). "SC Soundtrack Smash Deluxe Exclusive". Target. Retrieved June 8, 2012.
    8. ^ "Bombshell". Amazon. Retrieved February 16, 2013.
    9. ^ "Bombshell Deluxe version". Target. Archived from the original on March 4, 2013. Retrieved February 16, 2013.
    10. ^ iTunes, "The Music of Smash: The Complete Season 1"
    11. ^ iTunes, "The Music of Smash: The Complete Season 2"
    12. ^ BroadwayWorld.com, June 28, 2012 "Update: Smash picks new Broadway songwriters for Season 2"
    13. ^ Broadway.com, January 25, 2013, "Meet Smash’s New Composers: Pasek & Paul, Joe Iconis and More Rising Talents to Watch"
    14. ^ a b Huffington Post, March 13, 2013, "'Smash': 'Rewrite This Story' From 'Musical Chairs'"
    15. ^ BroadwayWorld.com, February 18, 2013, "New Smash Song: 'Good For You'"
    16. ^ BMI.com Repertoire Search, "Heart Shaped Wreckage"[permanent dead link]
    17. ^ The Huffington Post, March 20, 2013, "'Smash': 'I Heard Your Voice In A Dream' Written By Andrew McMahon From 'The Bells And Whistles'"
    18. ^ The Hollywood Reporter, March 29, 2013, "'Smash's' Krysta Rodriguez Goes to New Heights for 'Hit List' Song (Exclusive Video)"
    19. ^ "BMI.com Repertoire Search "Don't Let Me Know"". Archived from the original on June 28, 2013. Retrieved April 20, 2013.
    20. ^ Playbill.com, January 31, 2013, "Stage to Screen: Jeremy Jordan Dishes On His New Role as Bad-Boy Heartthrob of NBC's 'Smash'"
    21. ^ Broadwayworld.com, May 7, 2013, "McPhee's 'Pretender' From SMASH Now Available"
    22. ^ Broadwayworld.com, May 7, 2013, "McPhee/Davi SMASH 'I'm Not Sorry' Duet Now Available"
    23. ^ "'Smash' Gets A 'Big Finish'". HuffPost. May 15, 2013.
    24. ^ Variety.com, April 13, 2012, "Building into a 'Smash'?"
    25. ^ Idol Chatter, USAToday.com, 05-09-2012, "Kelly Clarkson hits 3 million for 'Stronger' single"
    26. ^ Idol Chatter, USAToday.com, 02-15-2012, "'Stronger single gets Kelly Clarkson a million downloads"
    27. ^ Idol Chatter, USAToday.com, 05-01-2013, "Fantasia album debuts at No. 1 R&B, No. 2 Billboard 200"
    28. ^ Idol Chatter, USAToday.com, 03-06-2013, "'Idol' sales report: Underwood, Phillips, Clarkson, etc."
    29. ^ Idol Chatter, USAToday.com, 03-20-2013, "Phillip Phillips' 'Idol' return means big sales boost"
    30. ^ Idol Chatter, USAToday.com, 04-03-2013, "Colton Dixon's sales soar after 'Idol' performance"

    External links

    • The Futon Critic: Smash episode listings
    • Amazon.com MP3 store: Smash cast songs
    • ASCAP Database Music Search
    • NBC.com Smash Music, Season 2 episode song information
    Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_songs_in_Smash&oldid=1052279883"
    List of songs in Smash
  • Does the NBC series Smash live up to its title?

    " ' Smash' review: NBC series lives up to title". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved March 27, 2012. ^ a b Goodman, Tim (February 2, 2012).
    For the 1990 Swedish comedy miniseries, see Smash (miniseries).
    2012 American television series
    Smash Title Card.jpgSmashGenreMusical
    DramaCreated byTheresa RebeckBased onthe novel Smash by Garson KaninDeveloped byRobert Greenblatt (uncredited)Starring
    • Debra Messing
    • Jack Davenport
    • Katharine McPhee
    • Christian Borle
    • Megan Hilty
    • Anjelica Huston
    • Leslie Odom Jr.
    • Jeremy Jordan
    • Krysta Rodriguez
    • Andy Mientus
    • Raza Jaffrey
    • Brian d'Arcy James
    Theme music composerMarc ShaimanOpening theme"5, 6, 7, 8" (Season 2)Composers
    • Marc Shaiman
    • Scott Wittman
    • Chris Bacon (score, episodes 7–32)
    Country of originUnited StatesOriginal languageEnglishNo. of seasons2No. of episodes32 (list of episodes)ProductionExecutive producers
    • Craig Zadan
    • Neil Meron
    • Darryl Frank
    • Justin Falvey
    • Marc Shaiman
    • Scott Wittman
    • Steven Spielberg
    • Theresa Rebeck
    • David Marshall Grant
    • Joshua Safran
    Producers
    • Jordon Nardino
    • Jim Chory
    Production locationsBrooklyn, New YorkCinematography
    • Shelly Johnson (pilot only)
    • M. David Mullen
    Editors
    • Andy Weisblum (pilot only)
    • Bill Henry
    • Camilla Toniolo
    • Allyson Johnson
    Running time40–45 minutesProduction companies
    • Madwoman in the Attic, Inc.
      (2012)
      (season 1)
    • DreamWorks Television
    • Universal Television
    DistributorNBCUniversal Television DistributionReleaseOriginal networkNBCPicture format1080i (HDTV)Original releaseFebruary 6, 2012 (2012-02-06) –
    May 26, 2013 (2013-05-26)External linksOfficial website

    Smash is an American musical drama television series created by playwright Theresa Rebeck and developed by Robert Greenblatt for NBC. Steven Spielberg served as one of the executive producers. The series was broadcast in the US by NBC and produced by DreamWorks Television and Universal Television. The series revolves around a fictional New York City theater community and specifically the creation of a new Broadway musical. It features a large ensemble cast, led by Debra Messing, Jack Davenport, Katharine McPhee, Christian Borle, Megan Hilty, and Anjelica Huston.

    The show debuted on February 6, 2012, and its first season ended on May 14, 2012. Its second season premiered on February 5, 2013, and ended on May 26, 2013. NBC announced a change in their lineup in March 2013 and moved the show to Saturdays starting April 6, 2013.[1] The series was cancelled on May 10, 2013.[2][3] Second-season executive producer-show runner Josh Safran said the final episode of Season 2 worked as a series finale.[4]

    The series, especially the pilot episode, enjoyed critical success. The first season received the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Choreography among four nominations. The series was also nominated for a Golden Globe Award for Best Television Series – Musical or Comedy and a Grammy Award for Best Song Written for Visual Media ("Let Me Be Your Star").

    Episodes

    Main article: List of Smash episodes
    SeasonEpisodesOriginally aired
    First airedLast aired
    115February 6, 2012 (2012-02-06)May 14, 2012 (2012-05-14)
    217February 5, 2013 (2013-02-05)May 26, 2013 (2013-05-26)

    The show revolves around a group of characters creating new Broadway musicals, where everyone must balance their often chaotic personal life with the all-consuming demands of life in the theater. The series features original music by composers Marc Shaiman and Scott Wittman.

    Season 1 (2012)

    Main article: Smash (season 1)

    Julia Houston (Debra Messing) and Tom Levitt (Christian Borle), a Broadway writing team, came up with the idea of a new musical based on the life of Marilyn Monroe titled Bombshell. Producer Eileen Rand (Anjelica Huston), in the midst of divorce proceedings from her philandering husband, jumps on board and brings with her Derek Wills (Jack Davenport), a difficult but brilliant director. Ivy Lynn (Megan Hilty) is initially cast as Marilyn, but is forced to deal with competition from the talented, yet naive ensemble member Karen Cartwright (Katharine McPhee). Julia's former lover Michael Swift (Will Chase) is initially cast in the role of Joe DiMaggio. However, when Julia and Michael's reunion causes serious trouble in her marriage to Frank (Brian d'Arcy James), the decision is made to fire Michael. The role of Marilyn is recast with film star Rebecca Duvall (Uma Thurman), leaving Ivy devastated. After a somewhat disastrous out-of-town opening in Boston, Rebecca has fallen sick due to a peanut allergy and the actor playing Joe departs the production for a better gig. Derek subsequently casts Karen in the role of Marilyn and Michael is reinstated as Joe. Karen discovers Ivy has slept with her fiancé Dev (Raza Jaffrey), while Eileen finds out that her assistant Ellis (Jaime Cepero) was the one who poisoned Rebecca and fires him. Karen gets through her debut and the season ends with the closing number being applauded by the audience.

    Season 2 (2013)

    Main article: Smash (season 2)

    As Bombshell works to open on Broadway in New York City, the show runs into legal and creative troubles which threaten its future. Meanwhile, the cast and crew (featured in Season 1) attempt to find work. Karen meets two aspiring friends and partners (Kyle, a stage writer played by Andy Mientus, and Jimmy, a composer played by Jeremy Jordan) and tries to get their work noticed, especially by Derek. Derek works with Broadway star Veronica Moore (Jennifer Hudson), who becomes friends with Karen. Ivy gets the lead in Liaisons, a show based on the play Les Liaisons Dangereuses. Bombshell needs work in order to open on Broadway. First, Peter Gillman (Daniel Sunjata), a dramaturg with whom Julia had a rocky relationship is hired in order to help re-write the show. Second, Jerry (Michael Cristofer) replaces Eileen as the show's producer after she had to step down when the federal authorities found out (through Jerry's orchestration) that she had financed Bombshell with illegal money. Jimmy and Kyle's show, called Hit List, eventually goes to the New York Fringe Festival and then they meet a producer for an off-broadway theater called Manhattan Theatre Workshop. Karen quits Bombshell to be in Hit List because she has to choose one of them. Ivy takes Karen's role as Marilyn Monroe in Bombshell. Hit List starts rehearsals. Karen and Jimmy's relationship starts to develop but may cause some disturbance in the work place with Derek's secret feelings for Karen. Hit List goes to Broadway produced by Jerry and Bombshell and Hit List go head-to-head at the Tony Awards. Hit List wins 7 Tonys, which is more than Bombshell, however Bombshell wins Best Musical and Best Actress (Ivy Lynn) in a Leading Role.

    Cast and characters

    Main article: Characters of Smash
    • Debra Messing as Julia Houston,[5] a successful Broadway lyricist and the musical's co-writer. She is married with a son, but had an affair with Michael Swift, who played Joe DiMaggio in the initial Marilyn workshop. Houston is based on creator Theresa Rebeck.[6]
    • Jack Davenport as Derek Wills,[5] the director of the musical, who will stop at nothing to make the show a success. He has an on-and-off relationship with Marilyn workshop star Ivy Lynn, though he has also shown interest in Karen Cartwright and had a physical relationship with Rebecca Duvall during the Boston preview before she left the show.
    • Katharine McPhee as Karen Cartwright,[5] an ingenue from Iowa, who lands a successful audition and becomes a serious contender for the role of Monroe. Somewhat new to show business, her naiveté is generally scorned by her peers, though her talent is rarely called into question. She played Marilyn for the Boston preview, when Rebecca Duvall left. In Season 2, she helps Hit List get started and plays Amanda/Nina after she quits Bombshell.
    • Christian Borle as Tom Levitt,[5] a theatrical composer and Julia's longtime songwriting partner. He and Derek Wills have an acrimonious relationship stemming from a business fallout 11 years ago. Tom briefly dates a Republican lawyer but later becomes attracted to Sam Strickland, a dancer in the ensemble of Bombshell.
    • Megan Hilty as Ivy Lynn,[5] a seasoned performer who, at the beginning of the series, is working in the ensemble of Heaven On Earth, another Broadway musical that Tom and Julia wrote. Ivy is favored by nearly everyone on board with the production to play Marilyn Monroe, but after the workshop flops, she is replaced by Rebecca Duvall. Throughout the show, she is in an on-and-off relationship with the Bombshell director Derek Wills and finds herself constantly competing with Karen in many different situations, eventually losing the role of Marilyn to her for the Boston preview.
    • Raza Jaffrey as Dev Sundaram (Season 1),[5][7] Karen's live-in boyfriend, who works in the office of the New York City mayor's press secretary who ultimately forces her to choose between their relationship or her career. He proposes marriage but when Karen is unsure, a despondent and intoxicated Dev sleeps with Ivy. Upon realizing who Dev is, Ivy tells Karen of their encounter and an angry Karen breaks up with Dev.
    • Jaime Cepero as Ellis Boyd (Season 1),[5][7][8] Tom's and later Eileen's conniving personal assistant who is attempting to receive credit for Bombshell and make his way as a show producer. As the first season continues, Ellis, convinced his suggestion of Marilyn created the show, takes more steps to be recognized as a producer, including giving Rebecca a drink mixed with peanuts, which she is allergic to, in order to remove her as the star. He boasts of this to Eileen as proof of his skills but she responds by firing him.
    • Anjelica Huston as Eileen Rand,[5] the musical's tenacious producer, who is dealing with divorce proceedings from her husband, Jerry, which could threaten the musical and forces her to think outside the box in securing funds for the show. A running gag throughout the series is Eileen throwing drinks into Jerry's face.
    • Brian d'Arcy James as Frank Houston (regular Season 1, guest Season 2),[5][7] Julia's husband and a high-school chemistry teacher, who wishes that Julia would spend more time at home. He was upset when she confessed to her affair with Michael Swift and more so when he confronted Swift and learned Julia had cheated on him earlier in the marriage. They eventually separated in the Season 2 premiere. In the final episode of the program Julia makes good with Frank and both of them go easy on their divorce proceedings. James was credited as guest star in the pilot, but was promoted to regular from episode 2. He made guest appearances in the second-season premiere and the series finale.
    • Jeremy Jordan as Jimmy Collins (Season 2), a working-class man from Brooklyn who is on the brink of self-destruction.[9][10]
    • Leslie Odom, Jr.[11] as Sam Strickland (regular Season 2, recurring Season 1), an ensemble member, a good friend of Ivy who is gay and very much into sports. Due to their mutual friendship with Ivy, he forms a connection with Tom.
    • Krysta Rodriguez as Ana Vargas (Season 2), Karen's new roommate who is looking for her big break.[12]
    • Andy Mientus as Kyle Bishop (Season 2), a poor kid from Brooklyn with dreams of writing for Broadway.[13] He is the writer of the book of Hit List.

    Development and production

    Conception

    Development began in 2009 at Showtime by then-Showtime entertainment president Robert Greenblatt and Steven Spielberg, from an idea by Spielberg, who had been working on the concept for years;[14] Greenblatt, described as a "devoted theater geek", had also produced a musical adaptation of the film 9 to 5 in 2009.[15] The original concept was that each season would follow the production of a new musical; if any of them were "stage-worthy", Spielberg would help produce them as stage productions.[16] The series was inspired by successful TV Dramas The West Wing and Upstairs, Downstairs and used them as role models. Garson Kanin's novel Smash (New York: Viking, 1980) provided the title and setting, although the plots have little in common.[16] As a Showtime show, the script contained a lot of nudity. "It was definitely a cable show," Debra Messing said.[17]

    In January 2011, Greenblatt brought the project with him to NBC when he was made NBC Entertainment president. Theresa Rebeck was brought on as showrunner and wrote the pilot script after Executive producers Craig Zadan and Neil Meron suggested her to Spielberg and Greenblatt.[16] NBC ordered production of a pilot in January 2011 for the 2011–12 television season.[18]

    Michael Mayer directed the pilot episode, with Spielberg serving as an executive producer.[19] It has been reported that the pilot cost .5 million to produce.[16][20] On May 11, 2011, NBC picked the project up to series. When the network announced its 2011–12 schedule on May 15, 2011, the series was slated to premiere in mid-season.[19] NBC opted to hold the show for mid-season in order to pair it up with the hit reality show The Voice on Monday nights.[21] On August 1, 2011, it was announced by the press that the show's series premiere date would be February 6, 2012, the night after Super Bowl XLVI, with heavy promotion through early winter on many of the network's properties before the premiere.[22][23] At the NBC Press Tour, Greenblatt announced that Smash would have 15 episodes produced for the first season to coincide with The Voice.[24]

    Crew

    The series is a production of Universal Television in association with DreamWorks.[19]Theresa Rebeck is the creator of the series, as well as the writer of the pilot episode[19] and five of the first season's episodes, including the season finale. The series has a large number of executive producers, including Steven Spielberg, Craig Zadan, Neil Meron, David Marshall Grant, Rebeck, Darryl Frank and Justin Falvey.[19]Marc Shaiman and Scott Wittman serve as the composers and executive producers.[19] In March 2012, Rebeck stepped down as showrunner of the musical drama.[25] On April 24, 2012, The Hollywood Reporter reported that Gossip Girl executive producer Joshua Safran would take the lead for the second season, while Rebeck would remain a writer and an executive producer.[6] However, on May 2, 2012, Rebeck stated in an interview that she would not be returning to the show in any capacity.[26]

    Production

    Many of those behind Smash began the series with high hopes. Rebeck was a large part of that. As one early hire later described her to BuzzFeed: "She was this kick-ass woman showrunner who wasn't taking shit from the network. Someone who had a very clear vision who was going to stand up to the network. They were all good things in the beginning."[15]

    Despite her experience writing and producing in television, Rebeck had never been a showrunner, responsible for the day-to-day operations of a series, before. David Marshall Grant, a playwright and actor who had served in that capacity during Brothers & Sisters' final seasons, was hired as executive producer to help her with it. Rebeck was reportedly resentful, and worried that she was being set up to fail and Grant positioned to replace her. Very quickly she began shutting him out of key decisions.[15]

    Rebeck also decided she would not run a "writers' room," i.e., a regular meeting with the entire writing staff to discuss and perfect episodes and plotlines. "[They] really are not my thing, because I can only stand being in a room with people so many hours a day," she told New York. "And I feel like early drafts should be speedy because everyone changes their mind, so why spend a lot of time up front parsing sentences?"[27] Instead she would follow the example of showrunners like Matthew Weiner and Aaron Sorkin and have writers submit a first draft, which she then revised.[15]

    Very quickly, the writers recalled, the show became a "dictatorship". Rebeck's opinion was the only one that mattered. She insisted on writing the second and third episodes herself, and writers said that the drop in quality was evident during pre-air screenings. During this time Rebeck was often fighting with Spielberg, who wanted Hilty, Greenblatt, or Grant replaced. As a result of these distractions, plotlines like Julia's adoption dilemma (mirroring Rebeck's real life) began to assume unusual prominence, and along with them secondary characters like Leo and Ellis became almost main characters—the latter because Spielberg reportedly liked him.[15]

    Since the writers never met as a group, they found that finished episodes often repeated the same character moments instead of advancing those characters, and that strange out-of-context moments, usually musical numbers set away from the stage, had been inserted. They were particularly frustrated in trying to write for Julia, whom Rebeck had based on herself and consequently would not allow to have any difficulties. Later in the season, they were hoping that Greenblatt would win some of their fights. "You know it's bad when our last hope was the network," one told BuzzFeed. However, many of them said the show's own problems were not entirely Rebeck's fault, since Greenblatt also intervened in things like costume design and Spielberg was not informed of the conflicts until near the end.[15]

    After she left the show, Rebeck, who, citing confidentiality requirements, did not respond to the BuzzFeed story at first other than to say she "was treated quite badly",[15] spoke at some length to The New York Observer about Smash:

    One of the points of contention last year was that the network thinks they have the right to say to the writer of the show, "We don't want her to do this. We want her to do this ... And I would sometimes say back to them, "She would never do that." And they'd look at me like I was crazy, and I'd be like, "Nope, it's not crazy, it's just who the character is." You have to respect who the character is. It has its own internal truth and you can't betray that. And if you don't betray that, it will not betray you. There is this sort of sense that if you don't fuck with the muse—if you don't fuck with the muse, the muse will stand by you ... It turns into bigger questions about power and art, power and storytelling. Is power itself bigger than storytelling? And I would say no.[28]

    Following the show's cancellation, Kate Aurthur, the writer of the BuzzFeed story, reposted an email exchange she had with Rebeck. Pointing to the show's decline in ratings during its second season, Rebeck asked, "If in fact [I] was the problem with [the show], wouldn't things have gotten better—rather than dramatically worse—once [I] left?" She accused Aurthur of relying on a single unnamed source and asked that the story, which she called "wildly untrue", be taken down.[29]

    Music

    Main article: List of songs in Smash

    NBC announced on June 9, 2011, that they had signed a deal with Columbia Records for a soundtrack of the series. The deal gives Columbia worldwide digital and physical rights to the first season, with options to subsequent seasons. The deal includes both original songs written for the series and any covers of songs featured on the show.[30]

    The series soundtrack for Season 1, The Music of Smash, was released on May 1, 2012.[30][31] The album debuted on the Billboard 200 at #9, with 40,000 copies sold in its first week.[32]

    A Bombshell cast recording, featuring original songs from the first and second season of the show, was released on February 12, 2013, selling 16,000 copies in its first week.[33] It contains all 22 songs written for the fictional Bombshell musical and features lead vocals by Katharine McPhee (Karen Cartwright) and Megan Hilty (Ivy Lynn) as Marilyn Monroe.[34]

    In addition to songs by Marc Shaiman and Scott Wittman, the show's second season featured songs by up-and-coming composers Drew Gasparini, Joe Iconis, and writing duo Benj Pasek and Justin Paul.

    Several songs were written and performed for the series' Season 2 fictional musical, Hit List. On October 15, 2013, it was announced that Hit List would be staged in concert format at 54 Below on December 9. Smash stars Jeremy Jordan, Andy Mientus, and Krysta Rodriguez were scheduled to perform.[35] Because of demand for tickets, an additional performance was scheduled for December 8.[36]

    Bombshell musical numbers

    Act I
    • "Let Me Be Your Star" – Norma Jeane Mortenson
    • "At Your Feet" – Gladys, young Norma Jeane, Tourists and Hollywood Citizens
    • "Never Give All the Heart" – Norma Jeane
    • "The 20th Century Fox Mambo" – Marilyn Monroe and Twentieth Century Fox Studio Staff
    • "The National Pastime" – Marilyn and New York Yankees
    • "History is Made at Night" – Marilyn, Joe DiMaggio and Lovers
    • "I Never Met a Wolf Who Didn't Love to Howl" – Marilyn and Troops
    • "Mr. & Mrs. Smith" – Marilyn and Joe DiMaggio
    • "Don't Say Yes Until I Finish Talking" – Darryl F. Zanuck and Studio Executives
    • "Smash!" – Aspiring Actresses
    • "On Lexington & 52nd Street" – Joe DiMaggio, Marilyn, Reporter and New York Citizens
    • "Cut, Print...Moving On" – Marilyn and Studio Staff
    Act II
    • "Dig Deep" – Marilyn, Lee Strasberg and Students
    • "Public Relations" – Marilyn and Press
    • "Second Hand White Baby Grand" – Marilyn
    • "They Just Keep Moving the Line" – Marilyn
    • "Let's Be Bad" – Marilyn and the cast of Some Like It Hot
    • "The Right Regrets" – Arthur Miller
    • "Our Little Secret" – John F. Kennedy and Marilyn
    • "Hang the Moon" – Gladys and Marilyn
    • "Don't Forget Me" – Marilyn

    Hit List musical numbers

    Act I
    • "Broadway Here I Come (Pre-reprise)" — The Diva
    • "Rewrite This Story" — Amanda and Jesse
    • "Good for You" — Amanda
    • "Broadway Here I Come!" — Amanda
    • "The Love I Meant to Say" — Jesse
    • "Reach for Me" — The Diva
    • "Original" — Amanda
    • "The Love I Meant To Say (Reprise)" — Amanda (as "Nina")
    • "I Heard Your Voice In a Dream" — Jesse
    • "Don't Let Me Know" — Amanda (as "Nina") and Jesse
    • "Pretender" — Amanda (as "Nina")
    • "I'm Not Sorry" — Amanda (as "Nina") and The Diva
    • "I Heard Your Voice In a Dream (Reprise)" — Jesse
    • "Caught In the Storm" — Jesse
    Act II
    • "[TBD Coming Home Song]" — The Diva (as "Sara Smith")
    • "Good for You" — Amanda (as "Nina")
    • "Heart Shaped Wreckage" — Amanda and Jesse
    • "Broadway Here I Come (Reprise)" — Amanda
    • "The Love I Meant to Say (Reprise)" — Jesse
    • "The Goodbye Song" — Jesse, Amanda, The Diva and Ensemble[37]

    Original Broadway production

    During production of the show, executive producer Craig Zadan said: "We stand on the set, watch the Bombshell numbers and say, "Wouldn't this be great on Broadway? And so far that's where we've left it. Our priority now is producing a great TV show".[38]

    In June 2015, following a sold-out reunion performance at the Minskoff Theatre, it was announced that Bombshell would head to the Broadway stage. The executive producers of Smash and the Bombshell concert, Neil Meron and Craig Zadan, were set to executive produce the Broadway production. No timeline for the show has been announced.[39]

    In May 2020, shortly after a virtual cast reunion during a live-streamed concert, it was announced that a musical based solely on the plot of the series was in the works for a Broadway production. Spielberg, Greenblatt, and Meron are all attached as producers, with Bob Martin and Rick Elice penning the book to Wittman and Shaiman's score, and Bergasse returning to choreograph.[40] Of the announcement, Spielberg stated, "Smash is near and dear to my heart, and it seems fitting that a new musical inspired by what we did on the show would eventually come to the stage. I'm beyond thrilled to be working with this incredible creative team and my producing partners, who began the Smash journey with me over 10 years ago."[41]

    Critical reception

    The pilot of Smash received positive reviews from television critics, but the critical response was less positive as the season progressed.

    Review aggregator Metacritic, which assigns a normalized rating out of 100 of reviews from mainstream critics, calculated a score of 79 based on 32 reviews.[42] Maureen Ryan of The Huffington Post called it one of the strongest new shows of the season.[43]The Huffington Post writer Karen Ocamb praised the writing and the creativity of the series.[44] Mary McNamara of the Los Angeles Times called the show a "triumph" and said creator Theresa Rebeck as well as her team "have managed to capture the grand and sweeping gesture that is musical theater and inject it with the immediate intimacy of television."[45]David Wiegand of the San Francisco Chronicle gave the program a rave review: "[It's so] good you can't help wondering why no one thought of it before, a compelling mix of credible real-life melodrama with a fictionalized approximation of what it takes to get a Broadway show from the idea stage to opening night."[46] Tim Goodman from The Hollywood Reporter called the pilot episode "Excellent, a bar-raiser for broadcast networks", and superior to Glee.[47] He also praised writing and acting for the series, comparing it to the quality of a cable television series.[47] Matt Mitovich of TVLine called the cast "pretty damn perfect" and complimented the musical numbers.[48] Robert Bianco of USA Today gave the show three and a half out of four stars and wrote, "Unless you're allergic to musicals in general and Broadway in particular, you should find that a compelling central story, a strong cast, an out-of-the-procedural-mold premise and some rousing, roof-raising numbers more than compensate for any lingering problems."[49] Tanner Stransky of Entertainment Weekly ranked the pilot episode as the 8th best television episode of 2012, saying, "After we watched the subsequent 14 episodes of Smash with a mixture of fascination and dismay (seriously, did Debra Messing's Julia wear a men's pajama top to meet her lover?), it was difficult to recall that the pilot was positively magical. But it was. In fact, that episode-ending performance of 'Let Me Be Your Star' (featuring dueling divas Megan Hilty and Katharine McPhee) was among TV's most watchable and gleeful three minutes of the year. Rare is the series whose high-water mark is its pilot, and Smash is a shining example."[50]

    Chris Harnick of The Huffington Post wrote, "How has the rest of Season 1 been so far? Not so phenomenal. That's not to say it has been downright terrible—there have been some highly entertaining moments—but it certainly hasn't been goosebumps-inducing, like the final moments of Episode 1, set to 'Let Me Be Your Star.'"[51] Kevin Fallon summed up the response in The Atlantic, writing that "there's been an almost visceral reaction to how rapidly and sharply the show's quality has dipped, and just how much promise Smash has thwarted...In other words: It's bad." Fallon cites other critics in demonstrating the general acceptance of this opinion.[52]

    Awards and nominations

    Smash received a number of awards and nominations. In 2012, it was nominated for four Primetime Emmy Awards, winning one for Choreography.

    Year Award Category Recipient Result
    2011 Critics' Choice Television Award Most Exciting New Series Won
    2012 Primetime Emmy Award[53][54] Outstanding Guest Actress in a Drama Series Uma Thurman Nominated
    Outstanding Choreography Josh Bergasse Won
    Outstanding Music Composition for a Series Marc Shaiman (Original Music) & Christian Bacon (Score) Nominated
    Outstanding Original Music and Lyrics Marc Shaiman & Scott Wittman
    ("Let Me Be Your Star")
    Nominated
    Teen Choice Award Choice TV Breakout Show Nominated
    Choice TV Breakout Female Star Katharine McPhee Nominated
    Television Critics Association Award Outstanding New Program Nominated
    Women's Image Network Awards Best Drama Series Won
    Best Actress in a Drama Series Katharine McPhee Won
    Debra Messing Nominated
    2013 American Cinema Editors Award[55] Best Edited One-Hour Series for Commercial Television Andrew Weisblum ("Pilot") Nominated
    Dorian Award[56][57] LGBT TV Show of the Year Nominated
    Campy TV Show of the Year Nominated
    TV Musical Performance of the Year Katharine McPhee & Megan Hilty
    ("Let Me Be Your Star")
    Nominated
    Katharine McPhee, Raza Jaffrey & cast
    ("A Thousand and One Nights")
    Nominated
    Golden Globe Award Best Television Series – Musical or Comedy Nominated
    Grammy Award Best Song Written for Visual Media "Let Me Be Your Star"
    (Marc Shaiman & Scott Wittman)
    Nominated
    GLAAD Media Awards[58][59] Outstanding Drama Series Won
    CDG Awards[60][61] Outstanding Contemporary Television Series Molly Maginnis Won
    MPSE Golden Reel Award[62] Best Sound Editing: Short Form Musical in Television Dan Evan Farkas, Annette Kudrak and Robert Cotnoir MPSE ("Hell on Earth") Won
    Society of Operating Cameramen[63] Camera Operator of the Year in Television Jeff Muhlstock Nominated
    Primetime Emmy Award[64] Outstanding Original Music and Lyrics Marc Shaiman & Scott Wittman
    ("Hang the Moon")
    Nominated
    Andrew McMahon
    ("I Heard Your Voice In a Dream")
    Nominated

    Pre-release

    In June 2011, Smash was one of eight honorees in the "Most Exciting New Series" category at the 1st Critics' Choice Television Awards, voted by journalists who had seen the pilots.[65] Due to the already positive buzz surrounding the show,[citation needed] NBC offered early viewings of the pilot on different platforms. From January 15 through January 30, 2012, it was screened on selected flights of American Airlines.[citation needed] From January 16 through February 6, 2012, the full pilot was offered for free on iTunes, Amazon Video, Xbox, and Zune.[citation needed]

    Ratings

    The ratings for the Season 1 premiere were strong but ratings steadily dropped as the series progressed. The pilot episode was watched by 11.44 million viewers and had an 18–49 rating of 3.8/10.[66][67] It was also the third-highest-rated new drama debut of the 2011–2012 television season (behind Once Upon a Time and Touch)[68] and "delivered the biggest 10 p.m. rating of any drama in this television season", according to Entertainment Weekly.[69] The program also had the highest 18–49 rating and viewership for an NBC series in the time slot since November 2008,[70] but ratings declined in subsequent episodes. The fourth episode, aired on February 27, was seen by 6.6 million viewers and received a 2.3/6 rating in the 18–49 age group.[71] However, the show's fifth episode, aired on March 5, saw a 17% increase in ratings. It had an 18–49 rating of 2.7/7 and was seen by 7.76 million viewers.[72] But ratings for the show decreased in later episodes, with the eighth episode dropping to an 18–49 rating of 2.1/5 and viewership going down to 6.4 million viewers.[73] Nonetheless, it became NBC's #1 drama in adults 18–49 and total viewers.[74] The series was also up 160 percent in adults 18–49 versus NBC's season average in the time period prior to Smash (with a 2.6 rating vs. a 1.0, "live plus same day") and in total viewers, Smash has improved the time period by 100 percent (7.7 million vs. 3.9 million).[75]

    For Season 2, Smash was scheduled for Tuesdays at 10 at mid-season starting February 5, behind the low-rated The New Normal and several weeks before the new season of The Voice premiered, and the ratings cratered, with the February 5, 2013 2-hour 2-episode season premiere getting a 1.2 rating in the 18–49 demo. The ratings slid further to 0.9 for the 3rd episode and stayed around that number through the sixth episode, when NBC announced it was moving Smash to Saturdays as of April 6, 2013 and changing up its Tuesday lineup to put its dating reality show Ready for Love behind The Voice.[76]

    Season Timeslot (ET) Season premiere Season finale Rank Viewers
    (in millions)
    Viewers High
    (in millions)
    Viewers Low
    (in millions)
    18–49 Average 18–49 High 18–49 Low Ref
    1 Monday 10:00 p.m. February 6, 2012 May 14, 2012 #51 8.94 11.44 5.34 3.2 3.8 1.8 [77]
    2 Tuesday 10:00 p.m.
    (February 5 – April 2, 2013)
    Saturday 9:00 p.m.
    (April 6, 2013)[1]
    Saturday 8:00 p.m.
    (April 13 – May 11, 2013)
    Sunday 9:00 p.m.
    (May 26, 2013)[78]
    February 5, 2013 May 26, 2013 #113 2.72 4.48 1.80 1.4 1.2 0.4 [79]

    Syndication

    Ovation has picked up off-network rights to Smash. The first season debuted on July 19, 2013. Season 2 episodes, scheduled to begin airing in November 2013, were pushed back to January 2014.[80]

    DVD releases

    The first season of Smash was released under the title Smash: Season One as a widescreen four-disc DVD box set on October 29, 2012, formatted for Region 2. The DVD formatted for Region 1 was released on January 8, 2013. Distributed by Universal Studios Home Entertainment, the set features every episode and includes several DVD extras including behind-the-scenes footage and making-of features as well as extended and deleted scenes and a blooper reel. Also included is an UltraViolet copy of each episode.[81]

    The Target exclusive edition of the Season 1 set includes a fifth disc that includes the full-length music video for "Touch Me" performed by Katharine McPhee, as well as twenty minutes of additional interviews with Jack Davenport (Derek Wills) and Megan Hilty (Ivy Lynn).

    Season 2 was released on DVD on August 6, 2013.[82]

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    External links

    • Official website Edit this at Wikidata
    • Smash at IMDb Edit this at Wikidata
    Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Smash_(TV_series)&oldid=1057807632"
    Smash (TV series)
  • Who is the creator of Smash?

    Smash is an American musical drama television series created by playwright Theresa Rebeck and developed by Robert Greenblatt for NBC. Steven Spielberg served as one of the executive producers. The series was broadcast in the US by NBC and produced by DreamWorks Television and Universal Television.
    For the 1990 Swedish comedy miniseries, see Smash (miniseries).
    2012 American television series
    Smash Title Card.jpgSmashGenreMusical
    DramaCreated byTheresa RebeckBased onthe novel Smash by Garson KaninDeveloped byRobert Greenblatt (uncredited)Starring
    • Debra Messing
    • Jack Davenport
    • Katharine McPhee
    • Christian Borle
    • Megan Hilty
    • Anjelica Huston
    • Leslie Odom Jr.
    • Jeremy Jordan
    • Krysta Rodriguez
    • Andy Mientus
    • Raza Jaffrey
    • Brian d'Arcy James
    Theme music composerMarc ShaimanOpening theme"5, 6, 7, 8" (Season 2)Composers
    • Marc Shaiman
    • Scott Wittman
    • Chris Bacon (score, episodes 7–32)
    Country of originUnited StatesOriginal languageEnglishNo. of seasons2No. of episodes32 (list of episodes)ProductionExecutive producers
    • Craig Zadan
    • Neil Meron
    • Darryl Frank
    • Justin Falvey
    • Marc Shaiman
    • Scott Wittman
    • Steven Spielberg
    • Theresa Rebeck
    • David Marshall Grant
    • Joshua Safran
    Producers
    • Jordon Nardino
    • Jim Chory
    Production locationsBrooklyn, New YorkCinematography
    • Shelly Johnson (pilot only)
    • M. David Mullen
    Editors
    • Andy Weisblum (pilot only)
    • Bill Henry
    • Camilla Toniolo
    • Allyson Johnson
    Running time40–45 minutesProduction companies
    • Madwoman in the Attic, Inc.
      (2012)
      (season 1)
    • DreamWorks Television
    • Universal Television
    DistributorNBCUniversal Television DistributionReleaseOriginal networkNBCPicture format1080i (HDTV)Original releaseFebruary 6, 2012 (2012-02-06) –
    May 26, 2013 (2013-05-26)External linksOfficial website

    Smash is an American musical drama television series created by playwright Theresa Rebeck and developed by Robert Greenblatt for NBC. Steven Spielberg served as one of the executive producers. The series was broadcast in the US by NBC and produced by DreamWorks Television and Universal Television. The series revolves around a fictional New York City theater community and specifically the creation of a new Broadway musical. It features a large ensemble cast, led by Debra Messing, Jack Davenport, Katharine McPhee, Christian Borle, Megan Hilty, and Anjelica Huston.

    The show debuted on February 6, 2012, and its first season ended on May 14, 2012. Its second season premiered on February 5, 2013, and ended on May 26, 2013. NBC announced a change in their lineup in March 2013 and moved the show to Saturdays starting April 6, 2013.[1] The series was cancelled on May 10, 2013.[2][3] Second-season executive producer-show runner Josh Safran said the final episode of Season 2 worked as a series finale.[4]

    The series, especially the pilot episode, enjoyed critical success. The first season received the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Choreography among four nominations. The series was also nominated for a Golden Globe Award for Best Television Series – Musical or Comedy and a Grammy Award for Best Song Written for Visual Media ("Let Me Be Your Star").

    Episodes

    Main article: List of Smash episodes
    SeasonEpisodesOriginally aired
    First airedLast aired
    115February 6, 2012 (2012-02-06)May 14, 2012 (2012-05-14)
    217February 5, 2013 (2013-02-05)May 26, 2013 (2013-05-26)

    The show revolves around a group of characters creating new Broadway musicals, where everyone must balance their often chaotic personal life with the all-consuming demands of life in the theater. The series features original music by composers Marc Shaiman and Scott Wittman.

    Season 1 (2012)

    Main article: Smash (season 1)

    Julia Houston (Debra Messing) and Tom Levitt (Christian Borle), a Broadway writing team, came up with the idea of a new musical based on the life of Marilyn Monroe titled Bombshell. Producer Eileen Rand (Anjelica Huston), in the midst of divorce proceedings from her philandering husband, jumps on board and brings with her Derek Wills (Jack Davenport), a difficult but brilliant director. Ivy Lynn (Megan Hilty) is initially cast as Marilyn, but is forced to deal with competition from the talented, yet naive ensemble member Karen Cartwright (Katharine McPhee). Julia's former lover Michael Swift (Will Chase) is initially cast in the role of Joe DiMaggio. However, when Julia and Michael's reunion causes serious trouble in her marriage to Frank (Brian d'Arcy James), the decision is made to fire Michael. The role of Marilyn is recast with film star Rebecca Duvall (Uma Thurman), leaving Ivy devastated. After a somewhat disastrous out-of-town opening in Boston, Rebecca has fallen sick due to a peanut allergy and the actor playing Joe departs the production for a better gig. Derek subsequently casts Karen in the role of Marilyn and Michael is reinstated as Joe. Karen discovers Ivy has slept with her fiancé Dev (Raza Jaffrey), while Eileen finds out that her assistant Ellis (Jaime Cepero) was the one who poisoned Rebecca and fires him. Karen gets through her debut and the season ends with the closing number being applauded by the audience.

    Season 2 (2013)

    Main article: Smash (season 2)

    As Bombshell works to open on Broadway in New York City, the show runs into legal and creative troubles which threaten its future. Meanwhile, the cast and crew (featured in Season 1) attempt to find work. Karen meets two aspiring friends and partners (Kyle, a stage writer played by Andy Mientus, and Jimmy, a composer played by Jeremy Jordan) and tries to get their work noticed, especially by Derek. Derek works with Broadway star Veronica Moore (Jennifer Hudson), who becomes friends with Karen. Ivy gets the lead in Liaisons, a show based on the play Les Liaisons Dangereuses. Bombshell needs work in order to open on Broadway. First, Peter Gillman (Daniel Sunjata), a dramaturg with whom Julia had a rocky relationship is hired in order to help re-write the show. Second, Jerry (Michael Cristofer) replaces Eileen as the show's producer after she had to step down when the federal authorities found out (through Jerry's orchestration) that she had financed Bombshell with illegal money. Jimmy and Kyle's show, called Hit List, eventually goes to the New York Fringe Festival and then they meet a producer for an off-broadway theater called Manhattan Theatre Workshop. Karen quits Bombshell to be in Hit List because she has to choose one of them. Ivy takes Karen's role as Marilyn Monroe in Bombshell. Hit List starts rehearsals. Karen and Jimmy's relationship starts to develop but may cause some disturbance in the work place with Derek's secret feelings for Karen. Hit List goes to Broadway produced by Jerry and Bombshell and Hit List go head-to-head at the Tony Awards. Hit List wins 7 Tonys, which is more than Bombshell, however Bombshell wins Best Musical and Best Actress (Ivy Lynn) in a Leading Role.

    Cast and characters

    Main article: Characters of Smash
    • Debra Messing as Julia Houston,[5] a successful Broadway lyricist and the musical's co-writer. She is married with a son, but had an affair with Michael Swift, who played Joe DiMaggio in the initial Marilyn workshop. Houston is based on creator Theresa Rebeck.[6]
    • Jack Davenport as Derek Wills,[5] the director of the musical, who will stop at nothing to make the show a success. He has an on-and-off relationship with Marilyn workshop star Ivy Lynn, though he has also shown interest in Karen Cartwright and had a physical relationship with Rebecca Duvall during the Boston preview before she left the show.
    • Katharine McPhee as Karen Cartwright,[5] an ingenue from Iowa, who lands a successful audition and becomes a serious contender for the role of Monroe. Somewhat new to show business, her naiveté is generally scorned by her peers, though her talent is rarely called into question. She played Marilyn for the Boston preview, when Rebecca Duvall left. In Season 2, she helps Hit List get started and plays Amanda/Nina after she quits Bombshell.
    • Christian Borle as Tom Levitt,[5] a theatrical composer and Julia's longtime songwriting partner. He and Derek Wills have an acrimonious relationship stemming from a business fallout 11 years ago. Tom briefly dates a Republican lawyer but later becomes attracted to Sam Strickland, a dancer in the ensemble of Bombshell.
    • Megan Hilty as Ivy Lynn,[5] a seasoned performer who, at the beginning of the series, is working in the ensemble of Heaven On Earth, another Broadway musical that Tom and Julia wrote. Ivy is favored by nearly everyone on board with the production to play Marilyn Monroe, but after the workshop flops, she is replaced by Rebecca Duvall. Throughout the show, she is in an on-and-off relationship with the Bombshell director Derek Wills and finds herself constantly competing with Karen in many different situations, eventually losing the role of Marilyn to her for the Boston preview.
    • Raza Jaffrey as Dev Sundaram (Season 1),[5][7] Karen's live-in boyfriend, who works in the office of the New York City mayor's press secretary who ultimately forces her to choose between their relationship or her career. He proposes marriage but when Karen is unsure, a despondent and intoxicated Dev sleeps with Ivy. Upon realizing who Dev is, Ivy tells Karen of their encounter and an angry Karen breaks up with Dev.
    • Jaime Cepero as Ellis Boyd (Season 1),[5][7][8] Tom's and later Eileen's conniving personal assistant who is attempting to receive credit for Bombshell and make his way as a show producer. As the first season continues, Ellis, convinced his suggestion of Marilyn created the show, takes more steps to be recognized as a producer, including giving Rebecca a drink mixed with peanuts, which she is allergic to, in order to remove her as the star. He boasts of this to Eileen as proof of his skills but she responds by firing him.
    • Anjelica Huston as Eileen Rand,[5] the musical's tenacious producer, who is dealing with divorce proceedings from her husband, Jerry, which could threaten the musical and forces her to think outside the box in securing funds for the show. A running gag throughout the series is Eileen throwing drinks into Jerry's face.
    • Brian d'Arcy James as Frank Houston (regular Season 1, guest Season 2),[5][7] Julia's husband and a high-school chemistry teacher, who wishes that Julia would spend more time at home. He was upset when she confessed to her affair with Michael Swift and more so when he confronted Swift and learned Julia had cheated on him earlier in the marriage. They eventually separated in the Season 2 premiere. In the final episode of the program Julia makes good with Frank and both of them go easy on their divorce proceedings. James was credited as guest star in the pilot, but was promoted to regular from episode 2. He made guest appearances in the second-season premiere and the series finale.
    • Jeremy Jordan as Jimmy Collins (Season 2), a working-class man from Brooklyn who is on the brink of self-destruction.[9][10]
    • Leslie Odom, Jr.[11] as Sam Strickland (regular Season 2, recurring Season 1), an ensemble member, a good friend of Ivy who is gay and very much into sports. Due to their mutual friendship with Ivy, he forms a connection with Tom.
    • Krysta Rodriguez as Ana Vargas (Season 2), Karen's new roommate who is looking for her big break.[12]
    • Andy Mientus as Kyle Bishop (Season 2), a poor kid from Brooklyn with dreams of writing for Broadway.[13] He is the writer of the book of Hit List.

    Development and production

    Conception

    Development began in 2009 at Showtime by then-Showtime entertainment president Robert Greenblatt and Steven Spielberg, from an idea by Spielberg, who had been working on the concept for years;[14] Greenblatt, described as a "devoted theater geek", had also produced a musical adaptation of the film 9 to 5 in 2009.[15] The original concept was that each season would follow the production of a new musical; if any of them were "stage-worthy", Spielberg would help produce them as stage productions.[16] The series was inspired by successful TV Dramas The West Wing and Upstairs, Downstairs and used them as role models. Garson Kanin's novel Smash (New York: Viking, 1980) provided the title and setting, although the plots have little in common.[16] As a Showtime show, the script contained a lot of nudity. "It was definitely a cable show," Debra Messing said.[17]

    In January 2011, Greenblatt brought the project with him to NBC when he was made NBC Entertainment president. Theresa Rebeck was brought on as showrunner and wrote the pilot script after Executive producers Craig Zadan and Neil Meron suggested her to Spielberg and Greenblatt.[16] NBC ordered production of a pilot in January 2011 for the 2011–12 television season.[18]

    Michael Mayer directed the pilot episode, with Spielberg serving as an executive producer.[19] It has been reported that the pilot cost .5 million to produce.[16][20] On May 11, 2011, NBC picked the project up to series. When the network announced its 2011–12 schedule on May 15, 2011, the series was slated to premiere in mid-season.[19] NBC opted to hold the show for mid-season in order to pair it up with the hit reality show The Voice on Monday nights.[21] On August 1, 2011, it was announced by the press that the show's series premiere date would be February 6, 2012, the night after Super Bowl XLVI, with heavy promotion through early winter on many of the network's properties before the premiere.[22][23] At the NBC Press Tour, Greenblatt announced that Smash would have 15 episodes produced for the first season to coincide with The Voice.[24]

    Crew

    The series is a production of Universal Television in association with DreamWorks.[19]Theresa Rebeck is the creator of the series, as well as the writer of the pilot episode[19] and five of the first season's episodes, including the season finale. The series has a large number of executive producers, including Steven Spielberg, Craig Zadan, Neil Meron, David Marshall Grant, Rebeck, Darryl Frank and Justin Falvey.[19]Marc Shaiman and Scott Wittman serve as the composers and executive producers.[19] In March 2012, Rebeck stepped down as showrunner of the musical drama.[25] On April 24, 2012, The Hollywood Reporter reported that Gossip Girl executive producer Joshua Safran would take the lead for the second season, while Rebeck would remain a writer and an executive producer.[6] However, on May 2, 2012, Rebeck stated in an interview that she would not be returning to the show in any capacity.[26]

    Production

    Many of those behind Smash began the series with high hopes. Rebeck was a large part of that. As one early hire later described her to BuzzFeed: "She was this kick-ass woman showrunner who wasn't taking shit from the network. Someone who had a very clear vision who was going to stand up to the network. They were all good things in the beginning."[15]

    Despite her experience writing and producing in television, Rebeck had never been a showrunner, responsible for the day-to-day operations of a series, before. David Marshall Grant, a playwright and actor who had served in that capacity during Brothers & Sisters' final seasons, was hired as executive producer to help her with it. Rebeck was reportedly resentful, and worried that she was being set up to fail and Grant positioned to replace her. Very quickly she began shutting him out of key decisions.[15]

    Rebeck also decided she would not run a "writers' room," i.e., a regular meeting with the entire writing staff to discuss and perfect episodes and plotlines. "[They] really are not my thing, because I can only stand being in a room with people so many hours a day," she told New York. "And I feel like early drafts should be speedy because everyone changes their mind, so why spend a lot of time up front parsing sentences?"[27] Instead she would follow the example of showrunners like Matthew Weiner and Aaron Sorkin and have writers submit a first draft, which she then revised.[15]

    Very quickly, the writers recalled, the show became a "dictatorship". Rebeck's opinion was the only one that mattered. She insisted on writing the second and third episodes herself, and writers said that the drop in quality was evident during pre-air screenings. During this time Rebeck was often fighting with Spielberg, who wanted Hilty, Greenblatt, or Grant replaced. As a result of these distractions, plotlines like Julia's adoption dilemma (mirroring Rebeck's real life) began to assume unusual prominence, and along with them secondary characters like Leo and Ellis became almost main characters—the latter because Spielberg reportedly liked him.[15]

    Since the writers never met as a group, they found that finished episodes often repeated the same character moments instead of advancing those characters, and that strange out-of-context moments, usually musical numbers set away from the stage, had been inserted. They were particularly frustrated in trying to write for Julia, whom Rebeck had based on herself and consequently would not allow to have any difficulties. Later in the season, they were hoping that Greenblatt would win some of their fights. "You know it's bad when our last hope was the network," one told BuzzFeed. However, many of them said the show's own problems were not entirely Rebeck's fault, since Greenblatt also intervened in things like costume design and Spielberg was not informed of the conflicts until near the end.[15]

    After she left the show, Rebeck, who, citing confidentiality requirements, did not respond to the BuzzFeed story at first other than to say she "was treated quite badly",[15] spoke at some length to The New York Observer about Smash:

    One of the points of contention last year was that the network thinks they have the right to say to the writer of the show, "We don't want her to do this. We want her to do this ... And I would sometimes say back to them, "She would never do that." And they'd look at me like I was crazy, and I'd be like, "Nope, it's not crazy, it's just who the character is." You have to respect who the character is. It has its own internal truth and you can't betray that. And if you don't betray that, it will not betray you. There is this sort of sense that if you don't fuck with the muse—if you don't fuck with the muse, the muse will stand by you ... It turns into bigger questions about power and art, power and storytelling. Is power itself bigger than storytelling? And I would say no.[28]

    Following the show's cancellation, Kate Aurthur, the writer of the BuzzFeed story, reposted an email exchange she had with Rebeck. Pointing to the show's decline in ratings during its second season, Rebeck asked, "If in fact [I] was the problem with [the show], wouldn't things have gotten better—rather than dramatically worse—once [I] left?" She accused Aurthur of relying on a single unnamed source and asked that the story, which she called "wildly untrue", be taken down.[29]

    Music

    Main article: List of songs in Smash

    NBC announced on June 9, 2011, that they had signed a deal with Columbia Records for a soundtrack of the series. The deal gives Columbia worldwide digital and physical rights to the first season, with options to subsequent seasons. The deal includes both original songs written for the series and any covers of songs featured on the show.[30]

    The series soundtrack for Season 1, The Music of Smash, was released on May 1, 2012.[30][31] The album debuted on the Billboard 200 at #9, with 40,000 copies sold in its first week.[32]

    A Bombshell cast recording, featuring original songs from the first and second season of the show, was released on February 12, 2013, selling 16,000 copies in its first week.[33] It contains all 22 songs written for the fictional Bombshell musical and features lead vocals by Katharine McPhee (Karen Cartwright) and Megan Hilty (Ivy Lynn) as Marilyn Monroe.[34]

    In addition to songs by Marc Shaiman and Scott Wittman, the show's second season featured songs by up-and-coming composers Drew Gasparini, Joe Iconis, and writing duo Benj Pasek and Justin Paul.

    Several songs were written and performed for the series' Season 2 fictional musical, Hit List. On October 15, 2013, it was announced that Hit List would be staged in concert format at 54 Below on December 9. Smash stars Jeremy Jordan, Andy Mientus, and Krysta Rodriguez were scheduled to perform.[35] Because of demand for tickets, an additional performance was scheduled for December 8.[36]

    Bombshell musical numbers

    Act I
    • "Let Me Be Your Star" – Norma Jeane Mortenson
    • "At Your Feet" – Gladys, young Norma Jeane, Tourists and Hollywood Citizens
    • "Never Give All the Heart" – Norma Jeane
    • "The 20th Century Fox Mambo" – Marilyn Monroe and Twentieth Century Fox Studio Staff
    • "The National Pastime" – Marilyn and New York Yankees
    • "History is Made at Night" – Marilyn, Joe DiMaggio and Lovers
    • "I Never Met a Wolf Who Didn't Love to Howl" – Marilyn and Troops
    • "Mr. & Mrs. Smith" – Marilyn and Joe DiMaggio
    • "Don't Say Yes Until I Finish Talking" – Darryl F. Zanuck and Studio Executives
    • "Smash!" – Aspiring Actresses
    • "On Lexington & 52nd Street" – Joe DiMaggio, Marilyn, Reporter and New York Citizens
    • "Cut, Print...Moving On" – Marilyn and Studio Staff
    Act II
    • "Dig Deep" – Marilyn, Lee Strasberg and Students
    • "Public Relations" – Marilyn and Press
    • "Second Hand White Baby Grand" – Marilyn
    • "They Just Keep Moving the Line" – Marilyn
    • "Let's Be Bad" – Marilyn and the cast of Some Like It Hot
    • "The Right Regrets" – Arthur Miller
    • "Our Little Secret" – John F. Kennedy and Marilyn
    • "Hang the Moon" – Gladys and Marilyn
    • "Don't Forget Me" – Marilyn

    Hit List musical numbers

    Act I
    • "Broadway Here I Come (Pre-reprise)" — The Diva
    • "Rewrite This Story" — Amanda and Jesse
    • "Good for You" — Amanda
    • "Broadway Here I Come!" — Amanda
    • "The Love I Meant to Say" — Jesse
    • "Reach for Me" — The Diva
    • "Original" — Amanda
    • "The Love I Meant To Say (Reprise)" — Amanda (as "Nina")
    • "I Heard Your Voice In a Dream" — Jesse
    • "Don't Let Me Know" — Amanda (as "Nina") and Jesse
    • "Pretender" — Amanda (as "Nina")
    • "I'm Not Sorry" — Amanda (as "Nina") and The Diva
    • "I Heard Your Voice In a Dream (Reprise)" — Jesse
    • "Caught In the Storm" — Jesse
    Act II
    • "[TBD Coming Home Song]" — The Diva (as "Sara Smith")
    • "Good for You" — Amanda (as "Nina")
    • "Heart Shaped Wreckage" — Amanda and Jesse
    • "Broadway Here I Come (Reprise)" — Amanda
    • "The Love I Meant to Say (Reprise)" — Jesse
    • "The Goodbye Song" — Jesse, Amanda, The Diva and Ensemble[37]

    Original Broadway production

    During production of the show, executive producer Craig Zadan said: "We stand on the set, watch the Bombshell numbers and say, "Wouldn't this be great on Broadway? And so far that's where we've left it. Our priority now is producing a great TV show".[38]

    In June 2015, following a sold-out reunion performance at the Minskoff Theatre, it was announced that Bombshell would head to the Broadway stage. The executive producers of Smash and the Bombshell concert, Neil Meron and Craig Zadan, were set to executive produce the Broadway production. No timeline for the show has been announced.[39]

    In May 2020, shortly after a virtual cast reunion during a live-streamed concert, it was announced that a musical based solely on the plot of the series was in the works for a Broadway production. Spielberg, Greenblatt, and Meron are all attached as producers, with Bob Martin and Rick Elice penning the book to Wittman and Shaiman's score, and Bergasse returning to choreograph.[40] Of the announcement, Spielberg stated, "Smash is near and dear to my heart, and it seems fitting that a new musical inspired by what we did on the show would eventually come to the stage. I'm beyond thrilled to be working with this incredible creative team and my producing partners, who began the Smash journey with me over 10 years ago."[41]

    Critical reception

    The pilot of Smash received positive reviews from television critics, but the critical response was less positive as the season progressed.

    Review aggregator Metacritic, which assigns a normalized rating out of 100 of reviews from mainstream critics, calculated a score of 79 based on 32 reviews.[42] Maureen Ryan of The Huffington Post called it one of the strongest new shows of the season.[43]The Huffington Post writer Karen Ocamb praised the writing and the creativity of the series.[44] Mary McNamara of the Los Angeles Times called the show a "triumph" and said creator Theresa Rebeck as well as her team "have managed to capture the grand and sweeping gesture that is musical theater and inject it with the immediate intimacy of television."[45]David Wiegand of the San Francisco Chronicle gave the program a rave review: "[It's so] good you can't help wondering why no one thought of it before, a compelling mix of credible real-life melodrama with a fictionalized approximation of what it takes to get a Broadway show from the idea stage to opening night."[46] Tim Goodman from The Hollywood Reporter called the pilot episode "Excellent, a bar-raiser for broadcast networks", and superior to Glee.[47] He also praised writing and acting for the series, comparing it to the quality of a cable television series.[47] Matt Mitovich of TVLine called the cast "pretty damn perfect" and complimented the musical numbers.[48] Robert Bianco of USA Today gave the show three and a half out of four stars and wrote, "Unless you're allergic to musicals in general and Broadway in particular, you should find that a compelling central story, a strong cast, an out-of-the-procedural-mold premise and some rousing, roof-raising numbers more than compensate for any lingering problems."[49] Tanner Stransky of Entertainment Weekly ranked the pilot episode as the 8th best television episode of 2012, saying, "After we watched the subsequent 14 episodes of Smash with a mixture of fascination and dismay (seriously, did Debra Messing's Julia wear a men's pajama top to meet her lover?), it was difficult to recall that the pilot was positively magical. But it was. In fact, that episode-ending performance of 'Let Me Be Your Star' (featuring dueling divas Megan Hilty and Katharine McPhee) was among TV's most watchable and gleeful three minutes of the year. Rare is the series whose high-water mark is its pilot, and Smash is a shining example."[50]

    Chris Harnick of The Huffington Post wrote, "How has the rest of Season 1 been so far? Not so phenomenal. That's not to say it has been downright terrible—there have been some highly entertaining moments—but it certainly hasn't been goosebumps-inducing, like the final moments of Episode 1, set to 'Let Me Be Your Star.'"[51] Kevin Fallon summed up the response in The Atlantic, writing that "there's been an almost visceral reaction to how rapidly and sharply the show's quality has dipped, and just how much promise Smash has thwarted...In other words: It's bad." Fallon cites other critics in demonstrating the general acceptance of this opinion.[52]

    Awards and nominations

    Smash received a number of awards and nominations. In 2012, it was nominated for four Primetime Emmy Awards, winning one for Choreography.

    Year Award Category Recipient Result
    2011 Critics' Choice Television Award Most Exciting New Series Won
    2012 Primetime Emmy Award[53][54] Outstanding Guest Actress in a Drama Series Uma Thurman Nominated
    Outstanding Choreography Josh Bergasse Won
    Outstanding Music Composition for a Series Marc Shaiman (Original Music) & Christian Bacon (Score) Nominated
    Outstanding Original Music and Lyrics Marc Shaiman & Scott Wittman
    ("Let Me Be Your Star")
    Nominated
    Teen Choice Award Choice TV Breakout Show Nominated
    Choice TV Breakout Female Star Katharine McPhee Nominated
    Television Critics Association Award Outstanding New Program Nominated
    Women's Image Network Awards Best Drama Series Won
    Best Actress in a Drama Series Katharine McPhee Won
    Debra Messing Nominated
    2013 American Cinema Editors Award[55] Best Edited One-Hour Series for Commercial Television Andrew Weisblum ("Pilot") Nominated
    Dorian Award[56][57] LGBT TV Show of the Year Nominated
    Campy TV Show of the Year Nominated
    TV Musical Performance of the Year Katharine McPhee & Megan Hilty
    ("Let Me Be Your Star")
    Nominated
    Katharine McPhee, Raza Jaffrey & cast
    ("A Thousand and One Nights")
    Nominated
    Golden Globe Award Best Television Series – Musical or Comedy Nominated
    Grammy Award Best Song Written for Visual Media "Let Me Be Your Star"
    (Marc Shaiman & Scott Wittman)
    Nominated
    GLAAD Media Awards[58][59] Outstanding Drama Series Won
    CDG Awards[60][61] Outstanding Contemporary Television Series Molly Maginnis Won
    MPSE Golden Reel Award[62] Best Sound Editing: Short Form Musical in Television Dan Evan Farkas, Annette Kudrak and Robert Cotnoir MPSE ("Hell on Earth") Won
    Society of Operating Cameramen[63] Camera Operator of the Year in Television Jeff Muhlstock Nominated
    Primetime Emmy Award[64] Outstanding Original Music and Lyrics Marc Shaiman & Scott Wittman
    ("Hang the Moon")
    Nominated
    Andrew McMahon
    ("I Heard Your Voice In a Dream")
    Nominated

    Pre-release

    In June 2011, Smash was one of eight honorees in the "Most Exciting New Series" category at the 1st Critics' Choice Television Awards, voted by journalists who had seen the pilots.[65] Due to the already positive buzz surrounding the show,[citation needed] NBC offered early viewings of the pilot on different platforms. From January 15 through January 30, 2012, it was screened on selected flights of American Airlines.[citation needed] From January 16 through February 6, 2012, the full pilot was offered for free on iTunes, Amazon Video, Xbox, and Zune.[citation needed]

    Ratings

    The ratings for the Season 1 premiere were strong but ratings steadily dropped as the series progressed. The pilot episode was watched by 11.44 million viewers and had an 18–49 rating of 3.8/10.[66][67] It was also the third-highest-rated new drama debut of the 2011–2012 television season (behind Once Upon a Time and Touch)[68] and "delivered the biggest 10 p.m. rating of any drama in this television season", according to Entertainment Weekly.[69] The program also had the highest 18–49 rating and viewership for an NBC series in the time slot since November 2008,[70] but ratings declined in subsequent episodes. The fourth episode, aired on February 27, was seen by 6.6 million viewers and received a 2.3/6 rating in the 18–49 age group.[71] However, the show's fifth episode, aired on March 5, saw a 17% increase in ratings. It had an 18–49 rating of 2.7/7 and was seen by 7.76 million viewers.[72] But ratings for the show decreased in later episodes, with the eighth episode dropping to an 18–49 rating of 2.1/5 and viewership going down to 6.4 million viewers.[73] Nonetheless, it became NBC's #1 drama in adults 18–49 and total viewers.[74] The series was also up 160 percent in adults 18–49 versus NBC's season average in the time period prior to Smash (with a 2.6 rating vs. a 1.0, "live plus same day") and in total viewers, Smash has improved the time period by 100 percent (7.7 million vs. 3.9 million).[75]

    For Season 2, Smash was scheduled for Tuesdays at 10 at mid-season starting February 5, behind the low-rated The New Normal and several weeks before the new season of The Voice premiered, and the ratings cratered, with the February 5, 2013 2-hour 2-episode season premiere getting a 1.2 rating in the 18–49 demo. The ratings slid further to 0.9 for the 3rd episode and stayed around that number through the sixth episode, when NBC announced it was moving Smash to Saturdays as of April 6, 2013 and changing up its Tuesday lineup to put its dating reality show Ready for Love behind The Voice.[76]

    Season Timeslot (ET) Season premiere Season finale Rank Viewers
    (in millions)
    Viewers High
    (in millions)
    Viewers Low
    (in millions)
    18–49 Average 18–49 High 18–49 Low Ref
    1 Monday 10:00 p.m. February 6, 2012 May 14, 2012 #51 8.94 11.44 5.34 3.2 3.8 1.8 [77]
    2 Tuesday 10:00 p.m.
    (February 5 – April 2, 2013)
    Saturday 9:00 p.m.
    (April 6, 2013)[1]
    Saturday 8:00 p.m.
    (April 13 – May 11, 2013)
    Sunday 9:00 p.m.
    (May 26, 2013)[78]
    February 5, 2013 May 26, 2013 #113 2.72 4.48 1.80 1.4 1.2 0.4 [79]

    Syndication

    Ovation has picked up off-network rights to Smash. The first season debuted on July 19, 2013. Season 2 episodes, scheduled to begin airing in November 2013, were pushed back to January 2014.[80]

    DVD releases

    The first season of Smash was released under the title Smash: Season One as a widescreen four-disc DVD box set on October 29, 2012, formatted for Region 2. The DVD formatted for Region 1 was released on January 8, 2013. Distributed by Universal Studios Home Entertainment, the set features every episode and includes several DVD extras including behind-the-scenes footage and making-of features as well as extended and deleted scenes and a blooper reel. Also included is an UltraViolet copy of each episode.[81]

    The Target exclusive edition of the Season 1 set includes a fifth disc that includes the full-length music video for "Touch Me" performed by Katharine McPhee, as well as twenty minutes of additional interviews with Jack Davenport (Derek Wills) and Megan Hilty (Ivy Lynn).

    Season 2 was released on DVD on August 6, 2013.[82]

    References

    1. ^ a b Kondolojy, Amanda (March 13, 2013). "NBC Announces 'Smash' Saturday Burn-Off, Shuffles 'Go On' and 'The New Normal' Finales & Moves 'Ready for Love' Into Post-Voice Tuesday Slot". TV by the Numbers. Archived from the original on March 16, 2013. Retrieved March 13, 2013.
    2. ^ Kondolojy, Amanda (May 10, 2013). "'Smash' Officially Canceled by NBC After Two Seasons". TV by the Numbers. Archived from the original on June 7, 2013. Retrieved May 11, 2013.
    3. ^ Andreeva, Nellie (May 10, 2013). "NBC Cancels 'Smash' After Two Seasons". TV Line. Retrieved May 11, 2013.
    4. ^ Ausiello, Michael (March 15, 2013). "Exclusive: Smash Boss 'Saddened' By Saturday Move, Says Season Is Building to Series Finale". TV Line. Retrieved March 15, 2013.
    5. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Smash Biographies". NBCUniversal Media Village. Archived from the original on February 5, 2012. Retrieved March 27, 2012.
    6. ^ a b Goldberg, Lesley (April 24, 2012). "'Smash' Taps 'Gossip Girl's' Josh Safran as New Showrunner". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved April 25, 2012.
    7. ^ a b c Mullins, Jenna (May 22, 2012). "Smash Shocker! Which Stars Were Just Axed From Season Two?". E! Online. Retrieved May 28, 2012.
    8. ^ Dagger, Peter (April 26, 2011). "Exclusive interview with NBC's Jaime Cepero [getting smashed]". The Callboard. Archived from the original on January 29, 2012. Retrieved January 15, 2011.
    9. ^ Mitovich, Matt Webb (May 21, 2012). "Exclusive: Smash Shakes Up Cast, Adding Three New Regulars for Season 2". TVLine. Retrieved June 6, 2012.
    10. ^ Ausiello, Michael (June 14, 2012). "Smash Exclusive: Newsies Star Jeremy Jordan Joins Season 2 Cast as a Series Regular". TVLine. Retrieved June 14, 2012.
    11. ^ "Leslie Odom Jr., Krysta Rodriguez Added To 'Smash' Cast". Deadline Hollywood. June 6, 2012. Retrieved June 6, 2012.
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    13. ^ Mitovich, Matt Webb (June 26, 2012). "Exclusive: Smash Season 2 Casting Exclusive: Will the New Guy Have the Write Stuff?". TVLine. Retrieved June 26, 2012.
    14. ^ Littleton, Cynthia (September 22, 2009). "Showtime, Spielberg team on series". Variety. Retrieved June 10, 2011.
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    17. ^ https://www.vulture.com/2020/05/smash-cast-talk-let-me-be-your-star-at-bombshell-concert.html
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    32. ^ Smith, Grady (May 9, 2012). "Album Sales: Carrie Underwood rules supreme, Norah Jones takes the second-place spot". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved May 20, 2012.
    33. ^ Mansfield, Brian (February 20, 2013). "Grammy sales boost Carrie Underwood above 'Idol' pack". Idol Chatter. USAToday. Retrieved February 20, 2013.
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    37. ^ The Unspoken Full Plot for Smash's 'Hit List' Musical Is Revealed
    38. ^ Hinckley, David (January 7, 2013). "'Smash' producers: 'Bombshell,' musical within the musical series, could still end up on Broadway". New York Daily News.
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    50. ^ "Best & Worst of 2012: 10 great and 5 not-so-great episodes". Entertainment Weekly. December 31, 2012. Retrieved January 2, 2013.
    51. ^ Harnick, Chris (March 26, 2012). "'Smash': Season 2 Can Win Me Back If..." The Huffington Post. Retrieved March 30, 2013.
    52. ^ Fallon, Kevin (April 10, 2012). "The TV Musical is Dead". The Atlantic. Retrieved April 10, 2012.
    53. ^ 2012 Emmy Nominations Press Release (PDF). Emmys.com. p. 7. Retrieved March 30, 2013.
    54. ^ 2012 Creative Arts Emmy Winners Press Release (PDF). Emmys.com. September 15, 2012. p. 20. Retrieved March 30, 2013.
    55. ^ Mike Fleming, Jr (January 11, 2013). "63rd ACE Awards: Best Pic Noms 'Argo,' 'Life Of Pi,' 'Lincoln' 'Zero Dark Thirty,' 'Les Miserables' And 'Silver Linings Playbook' Make Cut For Editing". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved March 30, 2013.
    56. ^ Kilday, Gregg (January 9, 2013). "Gay and Lesbian Entertainment Critics Announce Dorian Award Nominees". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved March 30, 2013.
    57. ^ Kilday, Gregg (January 18, 2013). "'Argo' Named Best Film by Gay and Lesbian Entertainment Critics Association". Yahoo! Movies. Retrieved March 30, 2013.
    58. ^ "2013 GLAAD Media Award Nominees Unveiled". Deadline Hollywood. January 16, 2013. Retrieved March 30, 2013.
    59. ^ Townsend, Megan (March 16, 2013). "Smash, How to Survive a Plague among GLAAD Media Award Recipients in New York". GLAAD.org. Retrieved March 30, 2013.
    60. ^ "Costume Designers Unveil CDG Awards Nominees". Deadline Hollywood. January 17, 2013. Retrieved March 30, 2013.
    61. ^ "Costume Designers Guild Awards: Jacqueline Durran Wins For 'Anna Karenina', Eiko Ishioka For 'Mirror Mirror', Jany Temime For 'Skyfall'; TV Winners 'Smash', 'AHS: Asylum', 'Downton Abbey'". Deadline Hollywood. February 20, 2013. Retrieved March 30, 2013.
    62. ^ "2013 Golden Reel Award Winners & Nominees: Television". mpse.org. Retrieved March 30, 2013.
    63. ^ Eng, David (March 10, 2013). "Society of Camera Operators Awards 2013 – Winners". chinokino.com. Retrieved March 30, 2013.
    64. ^ "2013 Primetime Emmy Award Nominations" (PDF). emmys.com. July 18, 2013. Retrieved July 18, 2013.
    65. ^ Andreeva, Nellie (June 9, 2011). "Critics' Choice Awards Honors 8 New Shows". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved June 10, 2011.
    66. ^ Fienberg, Daniel (February 7, 2012). "TV Ratings: Huge 'Voice,' OK 'Smash' premiere lead NBC Monday rout". HitFix. Archived from the original on January 23, 2013. Retrieved August 6, 2014.
    67. ^ Seidman, Robert (February 7, 2012). "Monday Final Ratings: 'The Voice,' 'Alcatraz,' 'House,' 'Two and a Half Men' Adjusted Up". TV by the Numbers. Archived from the original on February 9, 2012. Retrieved March 27, 2012.
    68. ^ O'Connell, Michael (February 7, 2012). "TV Ratings: 'Smash' Sings for NBC, 'The Voice' Stays Strong After Super Bowl". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved March 27, 2012.
    69. ^ Valby, Karen (February 7, 2012). "'Smash' starts solid; 'Voice' tops Monday ratings". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved March 27, 2012.
    70. ^ Jones, Kenneth (February 7, 2012). "'Smash' Ratings Are Solid; Musical TV Series Off to a Promising Start". Playbill. Retrieved June 5, 2021.
    71. ^ Gorman, Bill (February 28, 2012). "Monday Final Ratings: '2 Broke Girls' Adjusted Up; 'Smash,' 'Castle' Adjusted Down 'Daytona 500' Final Ratings". TV by the Numbers. Zap2it. Archived from the original on March 1, 2012. Retrieved March 27, 2012.
    72. ^ Bibel, Sara (March 6, 2012). "Monday Final Ratings: 'The Voice' Adjusted Up". TV by the Numbers. Archived from the original on March 8, 2012. Retrieved March 6, 2012.
    73. ^ Kondolojy, Amanda (March 27, 2012). "Monday Final Ratings: 'Alcatraz', 'DWTS' & 'Voice' Adjust Up, 'Castle' & Smash' Adjust Down". TV by the Numbers. Archived from the original on March 30, 2012. Retrieved March 27, 2012.
    74. ^ Andreeva, Nellie (March 22, 2012). "NBC's 'Smash' Renewed For Second Season". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved March 27, 2012.
    75. ^ Seidman, Robert (March 22, 2012). "'Smash' Renewed for a Second Season by NBC". TV by the Numbers. Archived from the original on March 24, 2012. Retrieved March 22, 2012.
    76. ^ Andreeva, Nellie (March 13, 2013). "NBC's 'Smash' To Move To Saturday, 'Go On' To Thursday, 'Ready For Love' To Tuesday". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved March 30, 2013.
    77. ^ Gorman, Bill (May 24, 2012). "Complete List Of 2011–12 Season TV Show Viewership: 'Sunday Night Football' Tops, Followed By 'American Idol,' 'NCIS' & 'Dancing With The Stars'". TV by the Numbers. Archived from the original on May 27, 2012. Retrieved March 30, 2013.
    78. ^ Michael Slezak. "'Smash' Series Finale Set for Sunday, May 26 — Pregnancy, Arrest, Spoilers – TVLine". TVLine. Retrieved December 2, 2015.
    79. ^ Complete List Of 2012–13 Season TV Show Ratings: 'Sunday Night Football' Tops, Followed By 'The Big Bang Theory,' 'The Voice' & 'Modern Family' Retrieved May 29, 2013
    80. ^ Rice, Lynette (June 27, 2013). "'Smash' repeats to air on Ovation". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved June 27, 2013.
    81. ^ Lambert, David (October 2, 2012). "Smash – Studio Press Release Reveals 'Season 1' Date, Details, Extras Finalized Packaging!". TVShowsonDVD.com. Archived from the original on October 5, 2012. Retrieved October 5, 2012.
    82. ^ "Smash – Season 2". tvshowsondvd.com. Archived from the original on December 8, 2015. Retrieved December 2, 2015.

    External links

    • Official website Edit this at Wikidata
    • Smash at IMDb Edit this at Wikidata
    Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Smash_(TV_series)&oldid=1057807632"
    Smash (TV series)
  • Is smash a good show to watch?

    5.0 out of 5 stars Watching SMASH is Pure Pleasure Verified purchase SMASH is one of the best TV series I've ever seen, and many fans were sad when NBC pulled the program after only two seasons.
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    1. February 6 2012

      44min

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    2. February 13 2012

      43min

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    3. February 20 2012

      43min

      TV-14

    4. February 27 2012

      43min

      TV-14

    5. March 5 2012

      43min

      TV-14

    6. March 12 2012

      43min

      TV-14

    7. March 19 2012

      43min

      TV-14

    8. March 26 2012

      43min

      TV-14

    9. April 2 2012

      43min

      TV-14

    10. April 9 2012

      43min

      TV-14

    11. April 16 2012

      43min

      TV-14

    12. April 23 2012

      43min

      TV-14

    13. April 30 2012

      42min

      TV-14

    14. May 7 2012

      43min

      TV-14

    15. May 14 2012

      43min

      TV-14

    Bonus (1)

    1974 global ratings

    How are ratings calculated?

    Top reviews from the United States

    Kristy and Kara HudsonReviewed in the United States on August 24, 2019

    First 5 or 6 episodes of SEASON ONE are DEF worth watching...

    Verified purchase8 people found this helpful
    MaturegeekReviewed in the United States on January 5, 2019

    Great show especially if you love Broadway Musicals...Just don't count on the digital copy

    Verified purchase11 people found this helpful
    MelreviewReviewed in the United States on May 26, 2018

    UltraViolet Code is Expired and Doesn’t Work

    Verified purchase12 people found this helpful
    Kate S.Reviewed in the United States on February 4, 2018

    A Guilty-Pleasure Through and Through.

    Verified purchase2 people found this helpful
    Susan Dormady EisenbergReviewed in the United States on November 6, 2015

    Watching SMASH is Pure Pleasure

    Verified purchase

    SMASH is one of the best TV series I've ever seen, and many fans were sad when NBC pulled the program after only two seasons. For me having the opportunity to see such Broadway titans as Christian Borle, Brian d'Arcy James, Will Chase, Megan Hilty, and others was special because usually you have to visit New York for this pleasure. I also enjoyed Debra Messing, who has moved on to THE MYSTERIES OF LAURA, and the suave British actor, Jack Davenport. The musical numbers are beautifully staged, and the series gives many insights into the backstage challenges of creating and/or starring in a Broadway musical. The music and lyrics by Marc Shaiman and Scott Wittman are so fine, they stand alone as a show-within-a-show called BOMBSHELL depicting the life of Marilyn Monroe. BOMBSHELL was produced on Broadway in a one-night concert version last spring, and there are rumblings about a future run. I admit, I watch both seasons of this program again and again, and always find something new to admire. If you love Broadway, you'll adore SMASH.

    5 people found this helpful
    Kindle CustomerReviewed in the United States on July 15, 2016

    "Smash" -- a smash from start to finish!

    Verified purchase
    GemmaReviewed in the United States on January 5, 2018

    Great line up of actors and actresses

    Verified purchase
    EryasDaxReviewed in the United States on September 18, 2014

    What do you call a practically perfect TV show? SMASH!

    Verified purchase
    See all reviews
    Watch Smash Season 1
Watch Smash Season 1

SMASH is one of the best TV series I've ever seen, and many fans were sad when NBC pulled the program after only two seasons. For me having the opportunity to see such Broadway titans as Christian Borle, Brian d'Arcy James, Will Chase, Megan Hilty, and others was special because usually you have to visit New York for this pleasure.

Skip to main content
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Add to
Watchlist
  1. February 6 2012

    44min

    TV-14

  2. February 13 2012

    43min

    TV-14

  3. February 20 2012

    43min

    TV-14

  4. February 27 2012

    43min

    TV-14

  5. March 5 2012

    43min

    TV-14

  6. March 12 2012

    43min

    TV-14

  7. March 19 2012

    43min

    TV-14

  8. March 26 2012

    43min

    TV-14

  9. April 2 2012

    43min

    TV-14

  10. April 9 2012

    43min

    TV-14

  11. April 16 2012

    43min

    TV-14

  12. April 23 2012

    43min

    TV-14

  13. April 30 2012

    42min

    TV-14

  14. May 7 2012

    43min

    TV-14

  15. May 14 2012

    43min

    TV-14

Bonus (1)

1974 global ratings

How are ratings calculated?

Top reviews from the United States

Kristy and Kara HudsonReviewed in the United States on August 24, 2019

First 5 or 6 episodes of SEASON ONE are DEF worth watching...

Verified purchase8 people found this helpful
MaturegeekReviewed in the United States on January 5, 2019

Great show especially if you love Broadway Musicals...Just don't count on the digital copy

Verified purchase11 people found this helpful
MelreviewReviewed in the United States on May 26, 2018

UltraViolet Code is Expired and Doesn’t Work

Verified purchase12 people found this helpful
Kate S.Reviewed in the United States on February 4, 2018

A Guilty-Pleasure Through and Through.

Verified purchase2 people found this helpful
Susan Dormady EisenbergReviewed in the United States on November 6, 2015

Watching SMASH is Pure Pleasure

Verified purchase

SMASH is one of the best TV series I've ever seen, and many fans were sad when NBC pulled the program after only two seasons. For me having the opportunity to see such Broadway titans as Christian Borle, Brian d'Arcy James, Will Chase, Megan Hilty, and others was special because usually you have to visit New York for this pleasure. I also enjoyed Debra Messing, who has moved on to THE MYSTERIES OF LAURA, and the suave British actor, Jack Davenport. The musical numbers are beautifully staged, and the series gives many insights into the backstage challenges of creating and/or starring in a Broadway musical. The music and lyrics by Marc Shaiman and Scott Wittman are so fine, they stand alone as a show-within-a-show called BOMBSHELL depicting the life of Marilyn Monroe. BOMBSHELL was produced on Broadway in a one-night concert version last spring, and there are rumblings about a future run. I admit, I watch both seasons of this program again and again, and always find something new to admire. If you love Broadway, you'll adore SMASH.

5 people found this helpful
Kindle CustomerReviewed in the United States on July 15, 2016

"Smash" -- a smash from start to finish!

Verified purchase
GemmaReviewed in the United States on January 5, 2018

Great line up of actors and actresses

Verified purchase
EryasDaxReviewed in the United States on September 18, 2014

What do you call a practically perfect TV show? SMASH!

Verified purchase
See all reviews
SMASH Cast: Where Are They Now

Following SMASH, Davenport acted in series like Next of Kin, Why Women Kill and White Famous. Most recently, he played Jennifer Aniston 's estranged husband, Jason Craig, on The Morning Show .

Credit: George Holz/NBCU Photo Bank/NBCUniversal via Getty Images; Ian West/PA Images via Getty Images

McPhee burst onto the scene in 2006 when she came in second on American Idol, and dazzled in SMASH as the underdog from Iowa, Karen Cartwright. Her character was up against Ivy Lynn for the role of Marilyn Monroe in the fictional — though it really should become real, don't you think? — Bombshell the musical. 

Since then, McPhee has appeared in TV series like Scorpion before making her actual Broadway debut in the musical Waitress

She also married famed musician and composer David Foster in June 2019. 

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Credit: Patrick Randak/NBC; LISA O'CONNOR/AFP via Getty Images

Hilty was already a seasoned Broadway veteran when she starred as Katharine McPhee's rival on- and offstage, Ivy Lynn. Hilty continues to rock the Great White Way after the show's end. 

Since SMASH, Hilty has acted on screen and stage alike. On TV, she starred on the likes of Girlfriends' Guide to Divorce and Sean Saves the World. In 2016, Hilty was nominated for a Tony Award for her role as Brooke Ashton in the Broadway revival of Noises Off. 

Credit: Patrick Randak/NBC; Bruce Glikas/WireImage

Messing played the iconic Grace Adler in Will & Grace, and took on plenty of film and television roles before stepping into the role of Julia Houston, the book writer and lyricist for Bombshell in 2012. 

She must've caught the Broadway bug, because she made her debut on The Great White Way in 2014 in the Tony-nominated play Outside Mullingar. She also starred in another hit series, The Mysteries of Laura, from 2014-2016. Most recently, Messing reprised her role in Will & Grace, which aired its series finale in April 2020.

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Credit: Patrick Randak/NBC; Bruce Glikas/Getty Images

Borle, another big name on Broadway, played Tom Levitt, the composer for Bombshell. 

In real life, Borle is a two-time Tony Award-winning actor, for his roles as Black 'Stache in Peter and the Starcatcher in 2012 and in 2015 for his role as William Shakespeare in Something Rotten! 

Since the show's end, he has appeared on series like The Good Wife, Masters of Sex and Younger (alongside his ex wife, actress Sutton Foster) and on the stage in Falsettos, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and Little Shop of Horrors. 

Credit: Patrick Randak/NBC; Kevin Winter/Getty Images

Brian d'Arcy James played Debra Messing's supportive husband, Frank Houston, on the series.

After the series ended, Broadway vet James rejoined castmate Christian Borle in Something Rotten! in 2015. He also had roles in critically acclaimed films like Molly's Game and Spotlight, and played Hannah Baker's dad, Andy, in 13 Reasons Why on Netflix. 

Next up, he'll play Officer Krupke in the upcoming 2020 film adaptation of West Side Story

Credit: Patrick Randak/NBC; Jim Spellman/WireImage

Ugh, Ellis! We know Jaime Cepero isn't actually a conniving, villainous assistant IRL, but his character on SMASH sure made our blood boil! 

Since the show's end, Cepero has spent most of his time onstage. He has acted in productions like Hair and Godspell, and often lends his vocal talents for concerts. 

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Credit: Patrick Randak/NBC; Kevin Winter/Getty Images

Before he played the talented — and slightly problematic — director of the fictional Bombshell, Derek Wills, Davenport was already a successful actor. 

He actually worked with castmate Debra Messing before on The Wedding Date in 2005, and also appeared in the Pirates of the Caribbean franchise. Following SMASH, Davenport acted in series like Next of KinWhy Women Kill and White Famous. Most recently, he played Jennifer Aniston's estranged husband, Jason Craig, on The Morning Show

Davenport made his Broadway debut in Saint Joan in 2018. 

Credit: Patrick Randak/NBC; Albert L. Ortega/Getty Images

Huston was already Hollywood royalty before playing the tough, determined producer Eileen Rand.

After two seasons on SMASH, she played Vicki on Transparent and has also lent her voice to several voiceover projects. 

Credit: Patrick Randak/NBCU Photo Bank/NBCUniversal via Getty Images; Robin L Marshall/Getty Images

It's true: Before Leslie Odom Jr. became a Tony Award-winner for Hamilton, he played Bombshell ensemble member Sam Strickland. 

Following SMASH, Odom acted on series like Person of InterestLaw & Order: Special Victims Unit and The Good Wife

Most recently, he starred alongside Cynthia Erivo in the Harriet Tubman biopic Harriet

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Credit: Patrick Randak/NBCU Photo Bank/NBCUniversal via Getty Images; Walter McBride/Getty Images

Jordan joined the cast in the show's second (and final) season, after starring on Broadway as Jack Kelly in Newsies

Jordan is a fantastic vocalist — if you haven't heard his rendition of Céline Dion's "It's All Coming Back to Me Now," you're missing out — and he showed off those vocals in the movie version of the musical The Last Five Years in 2014. 

Since 2015, he has appeared in the CW series Supergirl as Winn Schott/Toyman. 

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Credit: Patrick Randak/NBCU Photo Bank/NBCUniversal via Getty Images; Desiree Navarro/WireImage

Rodriguez joined SMASH in the show's second season as Karen Cartwright's talented roommate, Ana Vargas.

Rodriguez continued to act on Broadway in shows like First Date and Deaf West's production of Spring Awakening, and in various television series like Quantico and Trial & Error.

Most recently, you may have seen her in Netflix's Daybreak playing part-zombie teacher Ms. Crumble. 

After being diagnosed with breast cancer at 30, Rodriguez has since been vocal about spreading awareness, starting her website, ChemoCouture. 

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How "Smash" Became TV's Biggest Train Wreck

A show as complicated as Smash — with multiple musical numbers every week that needed to look and sound professional, in addition to the requirements of any television drama (an engaging plot ...

Greenblatt began as the entertainment chairman at NBC in early 2011, after its parent company, NBC Universal, was taken over by Comcast. The network had been down so long, it had become a punch line. One bad season had followed another. After the Jay Leno/Conan O'Brien disaster, which played out in an ugly, public, embarrassing way the previous year, it seemed like the once-No. 1 network might never recover its good name, especially in the creative community.

Then the well-respected Greenblatt arrived. As an executive at Fox in the '90s, he'd had a hand in beloved series such as Party of Five and The X-Files; later, as an independent producer, HBO's Six Feet Under was one of his shows. Then, as the entertainment president at Showtime for six years, he turned the identity-less HBO imitator into a prestigious, growing pay-cable channel. NBC was lucky to get him.

In addition to his talents as a television executive, Greenblatt is a devoted theater geek. While at Showtime, he also produced a theatrical adaptation of 9 to 5 with Dolly Parton, which had a short Broadway run in 2009. Greenblatt originally bought Smash for Showtime in November 2009. It had been Spielberg's idea; the star director wanted to create a scripted series about a musical, and if all went well, the fictional musical would actually be developed as a real one on Broadway. It was an ambitious project.

When Greenblatt went to NBC, he brought Smash with him. Craig Zadan and Neil Meron, the producing team who specialize in musical theater adaptations for film and television, were already in place as executive producers; Marc Shaiman and Scott Wittman, Tony winners for Hairspray, were also on board to write Smash's original music. With Glee having so much success at Fox, the timing seemed perfect for a show for adults about the behind-the-scenes drama of making a Broadway musical.

Rebeck had been involved since Smash's inception as well. Though mainly known as an accomplished playwright, she had spent time in television too, writing for NYPD Blue, Law & Order: Criminal Intent, and other shows. For years, Rebeck had wanted to create a TV series about a Broadway production, and no one had ever bitten. Then she was hired to do exactly that on Smash. According to a story in Variety by Cynthia Littleton, it was Rebeck's off-Broadway play The Understudy, a backstage satire about how theater has been ruined by stunt-casting and celebrity, that sold Spielberg on her.

"It was pretty exciting when they came looking for me," Rebeck told Littleton.

Once Greenblatt got to NBC, Smash became a reality. The cast included a television star (Debra Messing), notable theater actors like Christian Borle and Megan Hilty (who had been in Greenblatt's 9 to 5), American Idol finalist Katharine McPhee for novelty, and an Oscar-winning movie star, Anjelica Huston. The pilot was filmed a few months after Greenblatt started his new job, for a reported .5 million. It was directed by Michael Mayer, who had won the Tony for Spring Awakening, but had never directed television before. At Greenblatt's first upfront presentation in May 2011, when the broadcast networks unveil their new shows to advertisers and the press, he announced that Smash would premiere in midseason and be paired with the second season of the surprise hit The Voice.

No work of popular fiction receives unanimous acclaim. But the pilot for Smash, sent out to journalists shortly after the up-fronts, got a ton of early love from critics, and deservedly so. It set up a world full of compelling characters. Messing and Borle played Julia and Tom, a successful team of songwriters who are also best friends; they begin to write a musical based on the life of Marilyn Monroe, providing the plot's engine. Hilty and McPhee were two very different ingénue characters — Hilty's Ivy was the seasoned actress/singer who had been in a thousand choruses and needs her big break, while McPhee's Karen was the naïve Iowa transplant just starting out. Eileen Rand (Huston) was a big-shot producer who has to show she can have a hit without her ex-husband/ex-business partner, and Jack Davenport played Derek, the star director who is also a sexual predator when it comes to casting. The music was a combination of pop covers (McPhee sang Christina Aguilera's "Beautiful" during an audition scene) and original songs, topped off by the catchy "Let Me Be Your Star," a duet and duel between Ivy and Karen as they both audition for the part of Marilyn in Tom and Julia's nascent musical. "Let Me Be Your Star" literally stops the show — as the song crescendos, the pilot ends on a cliff-hanger: Which actress will be Marilyn? It was exciting.

A show as complicated as Smash — with multiple musical numbers every week that needed to look and sound professional, in addition to the requirements of any television drama (an engaging plot and characters) — had to be run meticulously. Any television series can go off the rails if the showrunner loses control, or, conversely, controls too much — if his or her ideas turn out to be bad ones. A creator with aggressive convictions about what the show is or should be is not rare in television, nor is it necessarily a bad thing for a show that has so many non-writers in producing roles. The issues occur when that person creates a show with obvious, worsening problems and won't listen to anyone else — and that is what happened with Rebeck.

A source who worked on Season 1 of Smash said, "Very quickly it just turned into kind of like — a kingdom or something. A dictatorship."

'Smash' Musical Based On Beloved TV Series Is Finally ...

21-05-2020 · "‘Smash’ is near and dear to my heart, and it seems fitting that a new musical inspired by what we did on the show would eventually come to the stage. I’m beyond thrilled to be working with this incredible creative team and my producing partners, who began the ‘Smash’ journey with me over ten years ago.”

21-05-2020

Cut, print, moving to Broadway! The long-awaited “Smash” musical is finally happening.

Much like the dueling stars at the center of NBC’s cult musical series, which chronicled among other things the backstage drama behind a Marilyn Monroe musical, “Smash” was always meant for The Great White Way.

Now, seven years after the TV series took its final bow, producer Steven Spielberg and company are developing a live stage adaptation, featuring many of the original songs written by the famed Grammy-winning duo Marc Shaiman and Scott Wittman.

Spielberg, along with producers Robert Greenblatt and Neil Meron, are ushering a new musical to the stage that will “generally follow the rollercoaster ride of mounting ‘Bombshell,’” the production at the center of the two-season TV series, according to a press release.

Megan Hilty as Ivy Lynn and Katharine McPhee as Karen Cartwright in the
Megan Hilty as Ivy Lynn and Katharine McPhee as Karen Cartwright in the "Smash" series finale.

But don’t expect the Broadway version to hit all the same notes. It will “depart liberally from the series” in many respects, the statement said.

Still, the general storyline will remain somewhat intact, following the hopefully scarfless hijinks of fictional writers, played by Debra Messing and Christian Borle in the TV series, and their attempt to give the famed blonde bombshell her due on Broadway.

The Marilyns who are fighting for the lead role (portrayed by Megan Hilty and Katharine McPhee onscreen) will “still be central to the storyline” and belt out the show-stopping number “Let Me Be Your Star.” But other details are “being kept under wraps,” according to the release.

“I am personally thrilled to be a part of this musical and its road to Broadway,” Spielberg said in a statement, per Variety. "‘Smash’ is near and dear to my heart, and it seems fitting that a new musical inspired by what we did on the show would eventually come to the stage. I’m beyond thrilled to be working with this incredible creative team and my producing partners, who began the ‘Smash’ journey with me over ten years ago.”

The cast of
The cast of "Smash" Season one.

The Broadway musical’s book will be co-written by Bob Martin and Rick Elice, according to Variety, with the show’s original choreographer Joshua Bergasse also returning.

Although the TV series was unceremoniously canceled after a much-retooled and poorly received final season, fans have remained enthusiastic. In 2015, the cast and crew put together a one-night-only concert of the songs, with tickets selling out in 15 minutes.

On Wednesday, the concert was streamed as an Actors Fund benefit with the stars coming together for a post-show virtual reunion.

Given the current Broadway shutdown due to the coronavirus pandemic, it’s unclear when the new “Smash” musical will debut. But at this point, nothing could dim this star.

‘Smash’ Star Katharine McPhee Announces Her Show Is ...

24-08-2020 · 'Smash' star Katharine McPhee announced that every episode and all two season of her NBC show are finally streaming on Amazon Prime Video, by way of …

24-08-2020
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Smash was gone far too soon after only two seasons on NBC. Making its short-lived run even more painful was the fact that the musical drama didn’t have an official streaming home for years. But now, Smash star Katharine McPhee would like to remind us that the series has landed on Prime Video, by way of the streamer’s IMDB TV platform.

“Not sure who needs to hear this but SMASH is now finally* available for streaming on AMAZON Prime,” the actress wrote on Twitter today, alerting all of her fans and Smash devotees that the series is now available to stream on Prime Video through Amazon’s IMDb TV channel, which offers all 32 episodes of the show for free with ads.

🚨 Not sure who needs to hear this but SMASH is now finally* available for streaming on AMAZON Prime 🚨

— Kat McPhee (@katharinemcphee) August 24, 2020

Smash, which first premiered on NBC in 2012, only ran for two seasons before the network canceled the drama, which followed the production of “Bombshell,” a Marilyn Monroe musical, and the drama behind the scenes of the show. McPhee stars in the series as Karen, a new arrival to New York City who snagged the “Bombshell” leading role of Marilyn, while Megan Hilty plays Broadway actress Ivy Bell, who lost out on the role and is determined to get her big break. Smash also features Debra Messing, Anjelica Huston, Christian Borle and Jack Davenport.

Since its debut and abrupt cancellation just one year later, the show has developed a cult following from its committed audience, who still remain loyal to its original songs, whacky plot points and over-the-top acting nearly ten years later.

“Some might remember Smash today for failing to live up to that outsized initial promise. Some might remember Smash as a disastrous flop,” Decider’s Joe Reid wrote in a 5-year anniversary tribute to the cult show. “But some saw Smash for a dunderheaded yet wholly unique show that didn’t just slip on Broadway as a costume but rather lived Broadway in its bones. No matter how many details it got wrong.”

If you missed out on the musical masterpiece of a series when it was on NBC, now’s your chance to finally experience the story of two dueling Marilyns and much, much more.

Where to watch Smash

  • katharine mcphee
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en.wikipedia.org

28-10-2021 · Season 2. The second season features original music from four different fictional musicals, Bombshell, Beautiful, Hit List and Liaisons, as well as ancillary songs written by the fictional songwriters behind Bombshell and Hit List.All of the songs have music and lyrics by Wittman and Shaiman, except for the songs from Hit List, which for the most part were written by a combination of other ...

28-10-2021
Wikimedia list article

Smash is an American musical television show that premiered on NBC, Monday, February 6, 2012.[1][2][3]

It was announced on June 9, 2011, that NBC had signed a deal with Columbia Records for a soundtrack of the series. The deal gave Columbia worldwide, digital and physical rights to the first season, with options to subsequent seasons. The deal included both original songs written for the series and any covers of songs featured on the show.[4]

By the end of the first season, 36 studio recordings of the show's musical performances were released, 31 of them on iTunes[5] and five with the deluxe edition of the first season soundtrack.

The first season soundtrack, The Music of Smash, was released on May 1, 2012.[6] A deluxe edition,[7] with additional songs, was available exclusively from Target until early 2013.

A second soundtrack album from the show, Bombshell, which serves as the "cast album" for Bombshell, the main show-within-the-show, was released on February 12, 2013, in standard[8] and deluxe versions,[9] the latter again exclusively from Target.

A third soundtrack album, The Music of Smash: The Complete Season 1, was released digitally exclusively by iTunes on May 21, 2013.[10] It consists of 36 songs that had been previously released for Season 1, either as singles or on the previous soundtrack albums, including the deluxe Target edition of The Music of Smash (which is currently out of print).

A fourth soundtrack album, The Music of Smash: The Complete Season 2, was released digitally exclusively by iTunes on May 21, 2013.[11] It consists of 51 songs from the second season, including three that hadn't previously been released during the season.

Performers

Season 1

Most songs in the first season are performed by the cast of Bombshell, which consistently includes Karen Cartwright (Katharine McPhee) and Ivy Lynn (Megan Hilty), and, at times, Michael Swift (Will Chase) and Rebecca Duvall (Uma Thurman). Other main characters to sing include Tom Levitt (Christian Borle), Dev Sundaram (Raza Jaffrey), Frank Houston (Brian d'Arcy James), Ellis Boyd (Jaime Cepero), and Eileen Rand (Anjelica Huston). Julia Houston (Debra Messing) and Derek Wills (Jack Davenport) have each been featured in choreography. Minor cast members, such as Sam Strickland (Leslie Odom, Jr.), have given performances as well. Various guest stars have appeared in the series, many of them giving vocal performances. These have included Nick Jonas as television star Lyle West, Bernadette Peters as Ivy's mother Leigh Conroy, Annaleigh Ashford as Lisa McMann, and Norbert Leo Butz as himself.

Season 2

Many of the same characters from the first season deliver performances in the show's second season, again with Karen Cartwright (Katharine McPhee) and Ivy Lynn (Megan Hilty) being the notable leads. Other vocal performers include Veronica Moore (Jennifer Hudson), Jimmy Collins (Jeremy Jordan), Kyle Bishop (Andy Mientus), Ana Vargas (Krysta Rodriguez), Leigh Conroy (Bernadette Peters), Tom Levitt (Christian Borle), Julia Houston (Debra Messing), Sam Strickland (Leslie Odom, Jr.), Terry Falls (Sean Hayes), Simon as JFK (Julian Ovenden), Daisy Parker (Mara Davi), unnamed actress playing young Marilyn (Sophia Caruso) and ensemble members Bobby (Wesley Taylor) and Jessica (Savannah Wise). Liza Minnelli and Kathie Lee Gifford played themselves in cameos.

Songs

See also: Original songs in Smash

Season 1

In the first season, all original songs contain music and lyrics by Marc Shaiman and Scott Wittman, except one where indicated.

List of songs in Smash
Title Version covered Composer(s) for originals Performed by Episode Single Album
"Over the Rainbow" The Wizard of Oz N/A Karen Cartwright 1. "Pilot" No N/A
"Never Give All the Heart" Original Marc Shaiman & Scott Wittman Ivy Lynn 1. "Pilot" No Bombshell
(Deluxe version) & Smash: Season 2
Karen 10. "Understudy" Yes Bombshell & Smash: Season 1
"The National Pastime" Original Shaiman & Wittman Ivy & Audition Dancers 1. "Pilot"
7. "The Workshop"
Yes Bombshell & Smash: Season 1
"I Wanna Be Loved by You" Marilyn Monroe N/A Lisa McMann 1. "Pilot" No N/A
"Beautiful" Christina Aguilera N/A Karen 1. "Pilot" Yes The Music of Smash & Smash: Season 1
"Happy Birthday, Mr. President" Marilyn Monroe N/A 1. "Pilot"
5. "Let's Be Bad"
No N/A
Rebecca Duvall 13. "Tech" No N/A
"Let Me Be Your Star" Original Shaiman & Wittman Karen & Ivy 1. "Pilot"
2. "The Callback"
7. "The Workshop"
Yes The Music of Smash,
Bombshell (Extended intro version), Smash: Season 1, Smash: Season 2
Ivy 6. "Chemistry" No N/A
Rebecca 11. "The Movie Star"
14. "Previews"
No N/A
"Call Me" Blondie N/A Karen 2. "The Callback" Yes Smash: Season 1
"The 20th Century Fox Mambo" Original Shaiman & Wittman Karen & Bombshell ensemble members 2. "The Callback"
7. "The Workshop"
15. "Bombshell"
Yes The Music of Smash, Bombshell, Smash: Season 1
Ivy & Bombshell ensemble members 4. "The Cost of Art"
7. "The Workshop"
No N/A
"Crazy Dreams" Carrie Underwood N/A Ivy 2. "The Callback" Yes The Music of Smash, Smash: Season 1
"Grenade" Bruno Mars N/A Michael Swift & the Bruno Mars jukebox musical cast 3. "Enter Mr. DiMaggio" Yes Smash: Season 1
"Redneck Woman" Gretchen Wilson N/A Karen & the karaoke bar patrons 3. "Enter Mr. DiMaggio" Yes Smash: Season 1
"Mr. & Mrs. Smith" Original Shaiman & Wittman Ivy & Michael 3. "Enter Mr. DiMaggio" Yes The Music of Smash, Bombshell & Smash: Season 1
Rebecca & Michael 14. "Previews" No N/A
Karen & Michael 15. "Bombshell" No N/A
"History is Made at Night" Original Shaiman & Wittman Ivy, Karen & the Bombshell cast 4. "The Cost of Art" No N/A
Ivy, Michael & the Bombshell cast 6. "Chemistry"
7. "The Workshop"
Yes The Music of Smash, Bombshell & Smash: Season 1
Ivy & Bobby 13. "Tech" No N/A
"Haven't Met You Yet" Michael Bublé N/A Lyle West 4. "The Cost of Art" Yes The Music of Smash & Smash: Season 1
"I Never Met a Wolf Who Didn't Love to Howl" Original Shaiman & Wittman Ivy, Julia Houston, Ellis Boyd, Michael, Lyle & Lyle's party patrons 4. "The Cost of Art" Yes Bombshell & Smash: Season 1
Karen & male ensemble members of Bombshell 15. "Bombshell" No N/A
"Rumour Has It" Adele N/A Karen, Sue, Jessica, & Bobby 4. "The Cost of Art" No N/A
"Let's Be Bad" Original Shaiman & Wittman Ivy & the Bombshell cast 5. "Let's Be Bad" Yes The Music of Smash, Bombshell & Smash: Season 1
"It's a Man's Man's Man's World" James Brown N/A Karen 5. "Let's Be Bad" Yes Smash: Season 1
"A Song for You" Donny Hathaway N/A Michael 5. "Let's Be Bad" Yes Smash: Season 1
"Who You Are" Jessie J N/A Ivy 6. "Chemistry" No The Music of Smash & Smash: Season 1
"Shake It Out" Florence + the Machine N/A Karen 6. "Chemistry" No The Music of Smash & Smash: Season 1
"Brighter Than the Sun" Colbie Caillat N/A Karen 7. "The Workshop" No The Music of Smash & Smash: Season 1
"Everything's Coming Up Roses" Gypsy N/A Leigh Conroy 7. "The Workshop" No The Music of Smash (Deluxe version) & Smash: Season 1
"On Lexington & 52nd Street" Original Shaiman & Wittman Michael 7. "The Workshop" Yes Bombshell & Smash: Season 1
"Touch Me" Original Ryan Tedder, Brent Kutzle, Bonnie McKee, & Noel Zancanella Karen 8. "The Coup" Yes The Music of Smash & Smash: Season 1
"Three Little Birds" Bob Marley & the Wailers N/A Frank Houston 8. "The Coup" No N/A
"Dance to the Music" Sly & the Family Stone N/A Jessica, Dennis, Bobby, Sam Strickland & Ivy 8. "The Coup" Yes Smash: Season 1
"The Higher You Get, the Farther the Fall" Original Shaiman & Wittman Norbert Leo Butz & the Heaven on Earth cast 9. "Hell on Earth" No N/A
"Arthur Miller Melody"[B] Original Shaiman & Wittman Frank 9. "Hell on Earth" No N/A
"Cheers (Drink to That)" Rihanna N/A Karen & Ivy 9. "Hell on Earth" Yes Smash: Season 1
"Breakaway" Kelly Clarkson N/A Ivy 10. "Understudy" No The Music of Smash (Deluxe version) & Smash: Season 1
"Don't Say Yes Until I Finish Talking" Original Shaiman & Wittman Tom Levitt & Bombshell male ensemble members 10. "Understudy" Yes Bombshell & Smash: Season 1
Marc Kudisch & Bombshell male ensemble members 14. "Previews" No N/A
"Three On a Match" Original Shaiman & Wittman The Three on a Match high school cast 10. "Understudy" No N/A
"Our Day Will Come" Ruby & the Romantics N/A Karen 11. "The Movie Star" No The Music of Smash
(Deluxe version) & Smash: Season 1
"Dig Deep" Original Shaiman & Wittman Rebecca & the Bombshell cast 11. "The Movie Star" Yes Smash: Season 1
"Run" Snow Patrol N/A Karen 12. "Publicity" No The Music of Smash
(Deluxe version) & Smash: Season 1
"A Thousand and One Nights" Original Shaiman & Wittman Karen, Dev Sundaram & Ensemble 12. "Publicity" Yes Smash: Season 1
"Second Hand White Baby Grand" Original Shaiman & Wittman Ivy 12. "Publicity" Yes Bombshell & Smash: Season 1
Rebecca 14. "Previews" No N/A
"Another Op'nin', Another Show" Kiss Me, Kate N/A Tom & Sam 13. "Tech" No N/A
"I'm Going Down" Rose Royce N/A Ivy 13. "Tech" Yes Smash: Season 1
"Smash!" Original Shaiman & Wittman Karen, Ivy, Sue, Jessica & Bombshell female ensemble members 14. "Previews" Yes Bombshell & Smash: Season 1
"September Song" Knickerbocker Holiday N/A Eileen Rand 14. "Previews" No The Music of Smash
(Deluxe version) & Smash: Season 1
"Stand" Donnie McClurkin N/A Sam, Karen & gospel choir 14. "Previews" No The Music of Smash & Smash: Season 1
"Don't Forget Me" Original Shaiman & Wittman Karen 15. "Bombshell" Yes Bombshell & Smash: Season 1

Season 2

The second season features original music from four different fictional musicals, Bombshell, Beautiful, Hit List and Liaisons, as well as ancillary songs written by the fictional songwriters behind Bombshell and Hit List. All of the songs have music and lyrics by Wittman and Shaiman, except for the songs from Hit List, which for the most part were written by a combination of other musical theater writers and contemporary rock singer-songwriters. The use of additional songwriters was done in part to "open up the sound" of Smash.[12]

List of songs in Smash
Title Version covered Composer(s) for originals Performed by Episode Single Album
"Cut, Print...Moving On" Original Marc Shaiman & Scott Wittman Karen Cartwright 1. "On Broadway" Yes Bombshell & Smash: Season 2
"Mama Makes Three" Original Shaiman & Wittman Veronica Moore & the Beautiful cast 1. "On Broadway" Yes Smash: Season 2
"Let Me Be Your Star" (Reprise) Original Shaiman & Wittman Karen, Jessica, Beth & Joy 1. "On Broadway" No N/A
Ivy Lynn 8. "The Bells and Whistles"
11. "The Dress Rehearsal"
No N/A
"On Broadway" The Drifters N/A Karen & Veronica 1. "On Broadway" Yes Smash: Season 2
"Don't Dream It's Over" Crowded House N/A Ivy 1. "On Broadway" No Smash: Season 2
"Broadway, Here I Come!" Original Joe Iconis[13] Jimmy Collins 1. "On Broadway" Yes Smash: Season 2
Karen 9. "The Parents"
13. "The Producers"
14. "The Phenomenon"
No N/A
Ana Vargas 11. "The Dress Rehearsal"
13. "The Producers"
No N/A
Karen, Jimmy, Ana, Sam Strickland & Hit List ensemble 17. "The Tonys" No Smash: Season 2
"Would I Lie to You" Eurythmics N/A Karen & Ivy 2. "The Fallout" No Smash: Season 2
"They Just Keep Moving the Line" Original Shaiman & Wittman Ivy 2. "The Fallout" No Bombshell & Smash: Season 2
Karen & Bombshell ensemble members 3. "The Dramaturg" No N/A
"Caught in the Storm" Original Pasek & Paul[14] Karen 2. "The Fallout" Yes Smash: Season 2
Jimmy 5. "The Read-Through" No N/A
"Good for You" Original Drew Gasparini[15] Karen 3. "The Dramaturg" Yes Smash: Season 2
"Soon As I Get Home" The Wiz N/A Veronica 3. "The Dramaturg" No N/A
"Dancing on My Own" Robyn N/A Ivy 3. "The Dramaturg" Yes Smash: Season 2
"Our Little Secret" Original Shaiman & Wittman Simon & Karen 3. "The Dramaturg" No Bombshell & Smash: Season 2
Simon & Ivy 11. "The Dress Rehearsal" No N/A
"I Got Love" Purlie N/A Veronica 4. "The Song" Yes Smash: Season 2
"I'm Not Lost" (partial) Original Shaiman & Wittman[A] Jimmy 4. "The Song" No N/A
"Chest of Broken Hearts" (partial) Original Shaiman & Wittman[A] Karen 4. "The Song" No N/A
"Everybody Loves You Now" Billy Joel N/A Kyle Bishop & Veronica 4. "The Song" No Smash: Season 2
"I Can't Let Go" Original Shaiman & Wittman Veronica, Karen & Ivy 4. "The Song" Yes Smash: Season 2
"Public Relations" Original Shaiman & Wittman Karen, Tom Levitt & Bombshell ensemble members 5. "The Read-Through" No Bombshell & Smash: Season 2
"Some Boys" Death Cab for Cutie N/A Karen 5. "The Read-Through Yes Smash: Season 2
"This Will Be Our Year" The Zombies N/A Jimmy, Kyle, Karen & Ana 6. "The Fringe" Yes N/A
"Never Give All the Heart" (Reprise) Original Shaiman & Wittman Karen & Bombshell ensemble members 6. "The Fringe" No N/A
"A Letter From Cecile" Original Shaiman & Wittman Ivy 6. "The Fringe" Yes Smash: Season 2
"Heart Shaped Wreckage" Original Julian Emery, Jon Green, Jim Irvin & Lucie Silvas[16] Karen & Jimmy 6. "The Fringe" Yes Smash: Season 2
Ana & Jimmy 7. "Musical Chairs" No N/A
"The National Pastime" (Reprise) Original Shaiman & Wittman Karen & Bombshell ensemble members 7. "Musical Chairs" No N/A
"Ce N'Est Pas Ma Faute (It's Not My Fault)" Original Shaiman & Wittman Terrence Falls & Liaisons ensemble members 7. "Musical Chairs" Yes Smash: Season 2
"Rewrite This Story" Original Pasek & Paul[14] Karen & Jimmy 7. "Musical Chairs"
13. "The Producers"
Yes Smash: Season 2
Sam 13. "The Producers" No N/A
Karen 16. "The Nominations" No N/A
"(Let's Start) Tomorrow Tonight" Original Shaiman & Wittman Sam, Tom, Bobby, & Jessica 8. "The Bells and Whistles" No Bombshell & Smash: Season 2
"I Heard Your Voice In a Dream" Original Andrew McMahon[17] Karen, Jimmy & Hit List ensemble members 8. "The Bells and Whistles Yes Smash: Season 2
"If I Were a Boy" Beyoncé N/A Ana 8. "The Bells and Whistles" Yes Smash: Season 2
"Reach for Me" Original McMahon[18] Ana 9. "The Parents" Yes Smash: Season 2
"Hang the Moon" Original Shaiman & Wittman Leigh Conroy & Ivy 9. "The Parents" No Bombshell & Smash: Season 2
"Original" Original Pasek & Paul[A] Karen 10. "The Surprise Party" Yes Smash: Season 2
"A Love Letter From the Times" Original Shaiman & Wittman Tom & Liza Minnelli 10. "The Surprise Party" Yes Smash: Season 2
"Bittersweet Symphony" The Verve N/A Ivy 10. "The Surprise Party" Yes Smash: Season 2
"Dig Deep" (Reprise) Original Shaiman & Wittman Ivy 11. "The Dress Rehearsal" No Bombshell & Smash: Season 2
"Don't Forget Me" (Reprise) Original Shaiman & Wittman Ivy 12. "Opening Night" Yes Smash: Season 2
"That's Life" Frank Sinatra N/A Karen & Ivy 12. "Opening Night" Yes Smash: Season 2
"The 20th Century Fox Mambo" (Reprise) Original Shaiman & Wittman Ivy & Kathie Lee Gifford 13. "The Producers" No N/A
"Don't Let Me Know" Original Silvas & Jamie Alexander Hartman[19] Karen & Jimmy 13. "The Producers" Yes Smash: Season 2
"The Goodbye Song" Original Iconis[20] Jimmy, Karen, Ana & the Hit List cast 13. "The Producers" Yes Smash: Season 2
"The Last Goodbye" Jeff Buckley N/A Kyle 13. "The Producers" Yes Smash: Season 2
"High and Dry" Radiohead N/A Jimmy 14. "The Phenomenon" Yes Smash: Season 2
"Vienna" Billy Joel N/A Tom 14. "The Phenomenon" Yes Smash: Season 2
"At Your Feet" Original Shaiman & Wittman Leigh & young Norma Jeane 14. "The Phenomenon" No Bombshell & Smash: Season 2
"The Love I Meant to Say" Original Shaiman & Wittman Jimmy 14. "The Phenomenon" Yes Smash: Season 2
"Pretender" Original Silvas & Busbee[21] Karen 15. "The Transfer" Yes Smash: Season 2
"Grin and Bare It" Original Shaiman & Wittman Ivy 15. "The Transfer" Yes Smash: Season 2
"I'm Not Sorry" Original McMahon[22] Karen & Daisy Parker 15. "The Transfer" Yes Smash: Season 2
"The Right Regrets" Original Shaiman & Wittman Julia Houston & Tom 15. "The Transfer" No Bombshell & Smash: Season 2
"Feelin' Alright" Traffic N/A Ivy 16. "The Nominations" No Smash: Season 2
"If You Want Me" Once N/A Ana 16. "The Nominations" No N/A
"Under Pressure" Queen & David Bowie N/A Ivy, Karen, Jimmy, Ana, Tom, Julia, Eileen Rand, Derek Wills & Sam 17. "The Tonys" No Smash: Season 2
"Big Finish" Original Shaiman & Wittman Karen & Ivy[23] 17. "The Tonys No Smash: Season 2

Notes

  • A ^ From episode credits
  • B ^ From the sheet music during the episode

Digital singles sales

Song Sales
Let Me Be Your Star 48,000[24]
Touch Me 18,000[25]
Beautiful 15,000[26]
That's Life 12,000[27]
I Can't Let Go 11,000[28]
Heart Shaped Wreckage 11,000[29]
I Heard Your Voice in a Dream 10,000[30]

References

  1. ^ Seidman, Robert (August 1, 2011). "It's Official: NBC Premieres Second Season of 'The Voice' After Super Bowl; 'Smash' Premieres Next Day". TV by the Numbers. Archived from the original on September 10, 2011. Retrieved August 1, 2011.
  2. ^ Morabito, Andrea (May 11, 2011). "NBC Orders Pilots 'Smash,' 'Whitney,' More". Broadcasting & Cable. Retrieved June 10, 2011.
  3. ^ Andreeva, Nellie (May 15, 2011). "NBC Unveils 2011–2012 Primetime Schedule". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved June 10, 2011.
  4. ^ Andreeva, Nellie (June 9, 2011). "Columbia Records Teams With NBC For 'Smash' Music Albums, Inks Solo Recording Deal With Co-Star Katharine McPhee". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved June 10, 2011.
  5. ^ "iTunes – Music – SMASH Cast". Itunes.apple.com. Retrieved June 8, 2012.
  6. ^ "The Music of SMASH". Amazon. Retrieved February 16, 2013.
  7. ^ SC Soundtrack Smash Deluxe Exclusive (May 1, 2012). "SC Soundtrack Smash Deluxe Exclusive". Target. Retrieved June 8, 2012.
  8. ^ "Bombshell". Amazon. Retrieved February 16, 2013.
  9. ^ "Bombshell Deluxe version". Target. Archived from the original on March 4, 2013. Retrieved February 16, 2013.
  10. ^ iTunes, "The Music of Smash: The Complete Season 1"
  11. ^ iTunes, "The Music of Smash: The Complete Season 2"
  12. ^ BroadwayWorld.com, June 28, 2012 "Update: Smash picks new Broadway songwriters for Season 2"
  13. ^ Broadway.com, January 25, 2013, "Meet Smash’s New Composers: Pasek & Paul, Joe Iconis and More Rising Talents to Watch"
  14. ^ a b Huffington Post, March 13, 2013, "'Smash': 'Rewrite This Story' From 'Musical Chairs'"
  15. ^ BroadwayWorld.com, February 18, 2013, "New Smash Song: 'Good For You'"
  16. ^ BMI.com Repertoire Search, "Heart Shaped Wreckage"[permanent dead link]
  17. ^ The Huffington Post, March 20, 2013, "'Smash': 'I Heard Your Voice In A Dream' Written By Andrew McMahon From 'The Bells And Whistles'"
  18. ^ The Hollywood Reporter, March 29, 2013, "'Smash's' Krysta Rodriguez Goes to New Heights for 'Hit List' Song (Exclusive Video)"
  19. ^ "BMI.com Repertoire Search "Don't Let Me Know"". Archived from the original on June 28, 2013. Retrieved April 20, 2013.
  20. ^ Playbill.com, January 31, 2013, "Stage to Screen: Jeremy Jordan Dishes On His New Role as Bad-Boy Heartthrob of NBC's 'Smash'"
  21. ^ Broadwayworld.com, May 7, 2013, "McPhee's 'Pretender' From SMASH Now Available"
  22. ^ Broadwayworld.com, May 7, 2013, "McPhee/Davi SMASH 'I'm Not Sorry' Duet Now Available"
  23. ^ "'Smash' Gets A 'Big Finish'". HuffPost. May 15, 2013.
  24. ^ Variety.com, April 13, 2012, "Building into a 'Smash'?"
  25. ^ Idol Chatter, USAToday.com, 05-09-2012, "Kelly Clarkson hits 3 million for 'Stronger' single"
  26. ^ Idol Chatter, USAToday.com, 02-15-2012, "'Stronger single gets Kelly Clarkson a million downloads"
  27. ^ Idol Chatter, USAToday.com, 05-01-2013, "Fantasia album debuts at No. 1 R&B, No. 2 Billboard 200"
  28. ^ Idol Chatter, USAToday.com, 03-06-2013, "'Idol' sales report: Underwood, Phillips, Clarkson, etc."
  29. ^ Idol Chatter, USAToday.com, 03-20-2013, "Phillip Phillips' 'Idol' return means big sales boost"
  30. ^ Idol Chatter, USAToday.com, 04-03-2013, "Colton Dixon's sales soar after 'Idol' performance"

External links

  • The Futon Critic: Smash episode listings
  • Amazon.com MP3 store: Smash cast songs
  • ASCAP Database Music Search
  • NBC.com Smash Music, Season 2 episode song information
Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_songs_in_Smash&oldid=1052279883"
Smash - TV Series Finale

29-05-2013 · Network: NBC Episodes: 32 (hour) Seasons: Two TV show dates: February 6, 2012 — May 26, 2013 Series status: Cancelled Performers include: Debra Messing, Jack Davenport, Katharine McPhee ...

29-05-2013

Performers include: Debra Messing, Jack Davenport, Katharine McPhee, Christian Borle, Megan Hilty, Raza Jaffrey, Brian d’Arcy James, Jaime Cepero, and Anjelica Huston.

TV show description:      
This musical drama revolves around the Broadway theater community. The TV series follows a cross section of dreamers and schemers who are trying to create a smash hit musical that’s based on the life of Marilyn Monroe.

The musical is written by the successful Houston-Levitt team. Writer Julia Houston (Debra Messing) struggles to balance the relentless demands of Broadway with the needs of her family. She recently began the process of adopting a child with her husband Frank (Brian d’Arcy James) of many years, but her focus is torn when she has the opportunity to write another Broadway hit. Frank set aside his own career as Julia’s took off. With their son Leo now in high school, he has become restless. Frank and Julia strive to maintain their family life as her attention is divided between Leo, her new musical, and the return of old flame Michael Swift (Will Chase).

The other half of the team, composer Tom Levitt (Christian Borle), fights to help his old friend Ivy (Megan Hilty) achieve stardom after she’s spent years in the chorus line. He’s assisted by Ellis (Jaime Cepero), a smart young man who’s armed with charm, boundless ambition, and ruthless determination.

A rivalry for the lead role in the musical is between stage veteran Ivy and a youthful, inexperienced Midwestern beauty named Karen Cartwright (Katharine McPhee). Karen gets a fast education on how to navigate the shark-infested waters of the professional theatre world. She wants to win the role of a lifetime while also maintaining her integrity. Karen’s supported by Dev (Raza Jaffrey), her loving and supportive boyfriend who works in the New York City’s Mayor’s office.

Tenacious and legendary Broadway producer Eileen Rand (Anjelica Huston) discovers the “Marilyn” project and jumps on board with a brilliant director, Derek Wills (Jack Davenport). A brilliant but arrogant talent, Derek is also a cunning, egocentric bad boy — as well as composer Tom’s arch-nemesis. Driven by a passionate love of her art, Eileen must masterfully manage both the warring egos of her creative team and her musical’s skyrocketing budget — all while her ex-husband, Jerry (Michael Christofer), freezes her assets.

Series Finale:     
Episode #32 — The Tonys
Leading up to the Tonys, each main player of “Bombshell” and “Hit List” perform an ensemble rendition of “Under Pressure.” With only 12 hours to go, Julia and Tom settle down to write their acceptance speech. Julia tells Tom that her lawyers want her to outline her relationship with Michael Swift to hopefully put an end to Frank’s case against her, but it only seems to be making it stronger.

While getting dressed, Ivy and Leigh watch a recording of one of Leigh’s old acceptance speeches; Leigh’s positive they’ll both win. When Ivy struggles to fit into the dress that fit her perfectly a week ago, she tells her mother she’s thinking of time off. Leigh laughs – what’s gotten into Ivy?! The Tonys will give her a career momentum she may never see again. Meanwhile, Derek’s holed up and drunk, too embarrassed to show his face in public after confessing to sexual bribery. Karen tries to cheer him up to no avail.

Jimmy gets cold feet about performing at the Tonys. With Derek missing in action, Jerry changes their awards show performance to “I’m Not Sorry,” with Daisy as the featured singer. None of the rest of the cast wants to work with her, though, as she’s being a prima donna. Ivy shows up and asks Karen where Derek is. Karen tells her he hasn’t gone out in weeks and she’s never seen him this low. When she discovers Jimmy has yet to pick up his Tony tickets, Karen calls to ask what’s going on. When he gets off the phone, it’s revealed Jimmy has moved out of his apartment – he’s even leaving his deposit behind.

Eileen finds Nick working as a short-order cook in a local diner; she tells him that he’s the only thing she’s got in her life at the moment, and – win or lose – she wants him by her side at the Tonys that night. Meanwhile, Daisy calls Jerry to tell him the whole cast of “Hit List” has staged a coup against her, refusing to perform her song. Jerry doesn’t care; if they don’t want to perform, Daisy will just perform “Reach for Me” solo. Jimmy stops by Tom’s place to ask Julia to accept Kyle’s award if he wins tonight. Realizing he’s planning a no-show, Julia tells Jimmy this is his big moment, and he has to stop self-sabotaging. Whatever it is that’s holding him back, Jimmy needs to confront it once and for all.

Ivy checks in on Derek, who seems to be getting worse. He’s struggling to take ownership of the wrongs he’s committed in his life, and even though they’re a source of anger and sadness for Ivy too, she still loves him. Ivy tells Derek to clean himself up and accompany her to the Tonys. Julia meets with Frank to confess the truth about her relationship with Michael. She met Michael years before Frank knew she did, and for much of their marriage he was there. Julia apologizes for not loving Frank “the right way,” and encourages him to follow his heart regarding their settlement. She won’t refute any of his claims. As she leaves, Frank grabs her arm and says, “Thank you. I’m pulling for you tonight.”

Off Julia’s advice, Jimmy puts on a tuxedo and surprises Karen at her place; he’s decided to go after all. Karen’s excited to see him and glad Jimmy finally came through, as he has a history of flaking. Ana is devastated she’s not going, but Jimmy surprises her – he has Kyle’s ticket and knows his deceased friend wouldn’t want them to go without her. As Ana rushes off to get ready, Karen kisses Jimmy. She thanks him, for everything, then rushes off to help Ana. Alone, Jimmy takes a nerve-wracking call, promising he’ll be there by midnight.

During the show, Jimmy and Karen comfort Ana as Daisy takes home the Tony for Best Actress in a featured role. It’s the fifth award for “Hit List” that night. When Ron Rifkin announces the nominations for best book, and Julia wonders to Tom if she could really be so selfless as to want Kyle to win instead of her; Tom jokingly says that historically, no, she couldn’t be… but people change. Jimmy breaks into tears when Kyle Bishop wins for best book. Through tears, Jimmy gives an impassioned speech in his friend’s honor, thanking Karen for making this night possible. Before leaving the podium, Jimmy has a special message for Julia: “You were right. It’s never too late.”

When the nominations for Best Original Score are announced, Tom and Julia commiserate together in their seats, joking that Jimmy’s going to win, so they need to get some alcoholic beverages in coconuts. It’s just like old times, and Tom and Julia are having so much fun, they don’t hear their names called. Shocked, they excitedly run up on stage to accept their award. Derek is nominated twice for Best Choreography and his name is met with boos and hissing. Although everyone assumes he’s absent, he runs onstage, having made a last minute entrance. He thanks voters for judging the work, not the man; then he dedicates the award to someone he truly loves, and to whom he owes everything – Ivy. Standing backstage, she’s conflicted by the show of gratitude.

Ivy finds Derek in the back of the theater, behind the audience. As Ivy attempts to tell Derek about her current situation, he puts her off one more time, saying he needs to do something. Derek pulls Karen and Ana out of the audience, saying he’s “making things right.” Backstage, Daisy prepares for her big solo, but Derek pulls her back – now that everyone hates him, he can do anything he wants. The whole “Hit List” cast, with Ana -and without Daisy – sings an a cappella version of “Broadway Here I Come,” which earns a standing ovation. As the crowd cheers, Jimmy kisses Karen and tells her he loves her.

Tom and Julia are walking around in the lobby, wondering if their Tonys mark their last hurrah, when Patrick Dillon approaches them. He congratulates them on their win, then asks if they’ve ever thought about writing for the movies? They are still a writing team, right? Julia and Tom look at each other for a moment, and then say yes! Of course they are. What an opportunity! As Patrick leaves, Julia encourages Tom to approach him, and thanks in part to the courage that comes with a Tony win, Tom asks Patrick out to dinner. Patrick tries to say he’s flattered, but not gay, but Tom kisses him before he can get it out. Patrick doesn’t exactly oppose the kiss! Tom quips, “That’s how all my straight friends kiss me,” before Patrick beats a hasty retreat.

When Ivy wins the Tony for Best Actress, Karen’s happy for her, but disheartened. In her speech, Ivy admits she didn’t think she would win, and thanks her mother for giving her the greatest gift – a life in the theater. Ivy can only hope that one day, she’ll give that gift to her children. Ivy says there’s nothing more special than the moment before a show, when the audience is full of hopeful anticipation, and anything can happen. She thanks everyone for believing there’s nothing better than live theater. In the lobby, Eileen comforts Karen, who’s worried she missed her shot. Eileen tells Karen she’s an amazing talent, and time is well on her side. An announcement is made; the award for Best Musical is about to be presented…

Rosie O’Donnell presents the Tony for Best Musical to “Bombshell,” capping off an amazing night for Eileen, even though “Hit List” won more awards in total. Eileen is beyond happy to have won – and beyond happy to be escorted by Nick. Calling Derek up to the stage, Eileen tells him Broadway will forget about his scandal – they just need him to do another show. At the after party, Ivy approaches Derek and asks if they can talk. In private, she tells him about her pregnancy, and though it’s unclear what he says, his actions imply Derek is willing to finally own up to his actions and take some responsibility.

Handing Kyle’s Tony to Ana, Jimmy pulls Karen aside to confess his shady past. A couple years ago, Jimmy gave a girl some drugs at a party and she took too much. He thought she died, and he changed his name and ran from the problem instead of taking responsibility, but today, he turned himself in. Karen freaks out, shocked by this revelation, but Jimmy assures her the cops said the girl was okay. She’s still alive! But he was charged with distribution of a controlled substance and will likely serve several months in jail. He posted bail that night so he could accompany her to the Tonys, but he has to go to jail tonight. He promised her he would do whatever to be the person she saw him as – and now he’s free to do just that.

At the bar, Tom and Julia flip on the TV to watch their song from the Tony Awards. They were so busy celebrating they didn’t get to see it live. Karen and Ivy perform a duet of the song “Big Finish,” and as this goes on, each character has a moment somewhere else around New York City. After a deep kiss, Karen tearfully says goodbye to Jimmy at the police station. Derek gently puts his hand on Ivy’s stomach. Julia gives her letter to the man for who it was intended – Michael. Tom looks proudly at his Tony, now resting on his home piano. And Eileen Rand stands triumphantly in her office, accompanied by her Tony, and more importantly, Nick Felder. Courtesy NBC.

First aired: May 26, 2013

Smash series finale recap: The Nominations/The Tonys

And so we've reached Smash's curtain call -- a flashy two-parter that gives most of the show's characters exactly what they deserve By Hillary Busis Updated May 27, 2013 at 03:25 AM EDT Advertisement

Leave it to Smash — or at least Smash‘s self-referential second season — to end on a winking note of meta commentary. The series’ last song is a cheeky, Chicago-esque duet that finds rivals Karen and Ivy putting aside their differences, donning matching dresses, and simultaneously delivering an important musical message:

“Give ’em that big finish

And they’ll forget what came before

Just give ’em that big finish

But always keep one eye on the door

…Let’s give ’em that big finish

And leave ’em wanting more!”

So, did “The Nominations” and “The Tonys” deliver a finish big enough to erase all memory of “what came before” — the [melo]drama, the [unintentional] laughter, the scarves? Of course it didn’t. While a frustrating finale can cast a pall over a great TV series, the opposite isn’t really true; months of shaky storytelling can’t be redeemed by a perfectly-executed ending, because that ending is affected by all the shaky storytelling that preceded it. For example: I was thrilled to know that Jimmy’s getting carted off to jail, but I also can’t help wishing he hadn’t been consistently loathsome enough to make me root for his incarceration.

That said, I do think that Smash basically stuck its landing. Yes, there were wrinkles — Michael Swift? What the hell are you doing here? — but generally, all that seemed wrong (Karen’s consistent over-praising) was made right (Ivy won the Tony!); the kingdoms were filled with joy (Tom and Julia, together again!); and those who deserved to (basically everyone but Jimmy) are certain to live long and happy lives, albeit ones that takes place only in our imaginations (read: weird fanfiction).

Now that we know how the whole shebang ends, recapping the first half of the finale — which covers the lead up to the Tony nominations — seems sort of unnecessary. But hey: There’s only so much Smash left to dissect, and I’ll be damned if I’ll let one ridiculous moment pass without obsessive scrutiny.

So! Hour 1 begins with poor, knocked up Ivy sadly singing a cover of “Feelin’ Alright” and occasionally punctuating her vocals with morning sickness. She’s acting so erratic that fair-weather friends Jessica and Bobby can’t help but pick-a-little, talk-a-little, and tell Sam that they think she’s hopped up on goofballs again.

You know who else is being crazy? Tom, who keeps checking his phone to see if he’s won an Outer Critics Circle Award for Best Direction… even though he and Eileen are currently sitting in a rival Broadway musical’s audience. Big faux pas, dude. While Tom learns that he did actually snag the prize, his buzz is immediately harshed when he realizes that hunky Tony committee member Patrick Dillon has been watching him behave obnoxiously all afternoon. Spoiler alert: Tom annoys Patrick a few times more, but Patrick ends up voting for Tom to get a Best Director nod anyway. (What? We’ve got 120 minutes of plot to get through, and not all of it is worth the virtual ink.)

NEXT: Once upon a time in Smashland

The Outer Critics Circle has been kind to Hit List, awarding the show some nine prizes (including a Best Blank Stare Actress award for Karen). But like Tom, the team can’t enjoy their wins because of a new crisis: Ana is filing a wrongful termination suit against both Derek and Jerry. The whole thing will go away if Daisy just exits the show and gives Ana her part back… but Daisy has no intention of doing that, because 10 years of endless striving in The Theatah automatically turns somebody into a bad person. Good thing Karen never has to work for any of her success; it’d only corrupt her.

As Karen tries to convince Daisy to choose another choice — that’s the thing about choices; they’re choosable! — Jimmy tries to convince The Village Voice‘s (ex) gossip columnist Michael Musto that Kyle deserves a Tony nomination. Alas, he’s not doing a great job, partially because he seems to have developed a nasty case of the Black Lung. (Can’t you just picture Jimmy yelling, “Merman! And not Ethel, either!”) Musto himself doesn’t help matters. He tells Jimmy that the theater world believes Julia was Hit List‘s true narrative visionary, mostly because Julia keeps talking about how great she thinks Kyle was. And on Smash, nobody is ever nice unless they’ve got an ulterior motive. Karen reassures Jimmy, saying Julia must be laying it on so thickly because she’s embarrassed about having used a script doctor herself on Bombshell.

Lawsuit or no lawsuit, Ana’s trying to move on with her life by auditioning for the national tour of Once. (Go for it, Ana — it might lead to a big TV gig!) She sings “If You Want Me” beautifully, the casting directors love her… and then it’s all ruined when she realizes Derek has set the whole thing up to get her out of town.

Speaking of messes Derek made: Ivy’s pregnancy hormones have led her to insult Hit List, cheerily telling a group of fans that the show only made it to Broadway because Kyle Larsoned. The jab, naturally, is captured on video and immediately posted on YouLenz. After a heart-to-heart with Sam, Ivy decides that the only way to get herself together is to tell her ex about the baby face-to-face. So she heads to the Outer Critics Circle Awards ceremony, conveniently held at what’s become The Only Bar in Town. At Table 46, she and Derek — who’s been avoiding her calls, mostly because of the whole lawsuit thing — have a promising conversation that ends with the promise of another meeting that night. There, she’ll finally spill the beans about the bun in her oven. Oh yeah — these two are gonna raise history’s most insecure, lecherous kid. Maybe they can name him Liberace.

Ivy then tries to make amends with Jimmy, apologizing for what she said about Kyle’s death. Predictably, he’s not exactly the forgiving type — leading Julia and Tom to come see what the fuss is about, which leads Karen and Derek to do the same, which leads to a big fight, which finally leads to Eileen rolling her eyes, marching over, and telling the kids to stop their whining RIGHT THIS SECOND or she’ll turn this car around and NOBODY will get to go to Disney World.

NEXT: Four reasons to wish Smash‘s fake Imitation of Life musical existed

And with that, everyone starts magically acting like the grown-ass people they are. Kidding! But Jimmy, at least, starts behaving a little less petulantly, mostly because Karen puts him in time-out (a.k.a. Hit List‘s audience) and he realizes that the show will be Kyle’s legacy, whether or not his dearly departed pal gets recognized by the American Theatre Wing. Julia also slinks up to Jimmy after the performance, telling him that while she’s not going to lie about what she did for Hit List, she’s also not going to lie about what Peter the Dramaturg (hey, remember him?) did for her and for Bombshell. “Artists shouldn’t feel ashamed about helping each other,” she says as “The More You Know” music swells. “It shouldn’t always be a competition.” Spoiler Alert: Soft thinking like this is what leads to a dead kid beating you for Best Book.

Karen and Derek’s Muse/Artist connection is so profound that she just knows he’s sitting at Table 46 that night, waiting to meet up with Ivy. She and Ana go from Hit List‘s theater to the bar, where Ana tells her ex-director that she’s going to take his Once buyout and drop the suit. Wait — why? There must have been some explanatory scene here that got cut for time; otherwise, there’s really no good reason given for Ana’s quick 180. Anyway, she does add that she still hasn’t forgiven Derek, and that she knows he wouldn’t have stopped his gross behavior unless she had exposed him. Then Ana leaves… revealing Ivy, who suddenly starts rethinking the whole baby daddy thing. She, too, leaves, after sadly telling Derek that he’s never done the right thing.

Bummed out? Don’t be — because here come Christine Ebersole and Cheyenne Jackson to announce the Tony nominees! The ones we care about (sorry, Best Scenic Design for a Play):

Featured Actress in a Musical

Lindsay Mendez, The Last Good Year

Anika Noni Rose, Imitation of Life

Casey Nicholaw, The Gathering Storm (Easter Egg alert: He also directed an episode of Smash earlier this season)

Susan Stroman, Imitation of Life

Harvey Fierstein, The Gathering Storm

David Lindsay-Abaire, The Last Good Year

According to the announcers, Kyle’s the youngest person ever nominated for this award. (For what it’s worth, Larson died at 35 and would have been 36 if he had lived to collect his own Best Book Tony.)

Tom Levitt and Julia Houston, Bombshell

Jeanine Tesori and Tony Kushner, Imitation of Life

Wow, Imitation of Life has an amazing team. Anyone else really starting to wish it existed?

NEXT: And finally, the category we’ve all been waiting for…

Rob Ashford, The Gathering Storm

Derek, apparently, is the first person to be nominated for three Tonys in one year since Bob Fosse, who managed that feat in both 1986 and 1976.

Lead Actress in a Musical

Karen Cartwright, Hit List

Audra McDonald, House of Flowers

We’re friends, so I can admit that this is precisely what I wrote in my notes after these nominees were announced: “WHAT?!?! THIS IS BULLSH– I HATE EVERYTHING.” And then Christine Ebersole opened her beautiful mouth and announced that she’d actually missed one name: Ivy Lynn, for Bombshell. Heart attack averted!

All in all, Bombshell gets 12 nominations and Hit List gets 13. Not a bad haul, especially for Derek “Fosse Jr.” Wills — but alas, the wretched womanizer can’t enjoy his moment of glory because Ivy’s words have cut to the very core of him. (She’s his Baxter.) There’s only one thing that might put the director out of his misery: Confessing the whole sordid Daisy/Ana saga to Michael Riedel, on the record. And all of a sudden, this finale just got more interesting.

Before we move on to episode 2, let’s breeze through a few quick Footlights:

– Derek quotes his “good friend Ronnie Moore” before telling Riedel all about the scandal. Wondering why Ronnie wasn’t nominated for Lead Actress for that revival of The Wiz we heard so much about, and also why she never popped up again this season? Blame scheduling conflicts.

– Josh Safran also tells EW that originally, he planned to bring Ronnie back to playsThe Diva in Hit List — pitting her against Karen and Ivy as a lead actress at the Tonys. Aw man, that sounds much better than this Daisy business. If only they had cast someone slightly less famous to play Ronnie! (Speaking of Anika Noni Rose, she would have killed.)

– Ivy’s assessment of Hit List apparently created a backlash against Jimmy’s show, though this is mentioned and dropped so quickly that it might as well not have happened at all.

– Tom’s ultra-awkward assessment of his relationship with Derek, as said in his Outer Critics Circle acceptance speech: “You and I go together about as well as Lena Dunham and a bra.”

– Yo Jimmy — if you’ve got a debilitating cough, maaaaybe stop smoking for a few days. Also: Guess he wasn’t nominated for Lead Actor, huh?

– Also, groan — Frank has reemerged, in order to remind us that Julia a) used to be married and b) had an affair with Michael Swift. This information will be sort of important in hour 2. Mostly, though, it feels like a storyline shoehorned in just in case Smash somehow ended up landing another season.

Onwards and upwards to the final finale! We begin with another dream sequence, courtesy of Tom, which finds the entire cast singing “Under Pressure” and slowly gathering on the stage of the Marquis Theatre — where the Tonys will take place that night. It’s cool to see everyone in one place, singing together, even if the overall effect (the way they trade lines of the song, the spinny camera) is a hair too close to Gleeville for my liking.

NEXT: Jimmy ruins everything, again

Tom wakes up — fortunately/unfortunately not next to Ellis this time — and gets to work. It’s Tony time, and he and Julia have an acceptance speech to write. (At some point, they also apparently pen a closing number for the awards show… though I guess that detail was supposed to be a surprise.) Julia also has to take care of some boring divorce business that’s just as snoozeworthy as last season’s adoption story. All you really need to know: She writes a detailed history of her affair with Michael, then meets up and sort of makes amends with Frank, then heads to the Tonys. Cut, print… moving on.

Derek, it seems, has been in downward spiral mode since he came clean about the Daisy chain. It’s so bad that the same tinkly snippet of “Let Me Be Your Star” that played when Ivy lept off the wagon last season is underscoring his scene. Scratch that: It’s so bad that even Karen Cartwright, muse to all, friend to none, can’t convince him to get out of bed. So Karen does something genuinely kind: she tells Ivy that Derek’s in a bad place, and admits that in this case, she doesn’t have “the magic touch” Ivy apparently does. (But… but… the magical Karen Cartwright!)

So Ivy heads to Derek’s formerly spotless bachelor pad and speaks from her heart, saying that she doesn’t want to go to the awards that night without him. Oh, and that she still loves him. Oh, and that he could really, really use a shower. The baby, though, stays under wraps, because you really shouldn’t tell a dude he’s going to be a dad unless he’s clean.

Originally, Hit List‘s gang was planning to do “I Heard Your Voice in a Dream” at the awards. Great choice, guys — it’s the show’s best song! Oh wait: Because Jimmy doesn’t want to perform at the show for some reason, the cast is told that they’ll actually be performing “I’m Not Sorry” instead. Booooo. Karen and co. feel the same way I do about the song, only in their case, it’s just because they all hate Daisy. So they resolve to handle this the mature way: by telling Jerry that Daisy can’t sit with them peform with them at the show. Jerry, magnificent bastard that he is, tells Daisy that this simply means she’ll be doing a solo number at the Tonys. Jimmy, this is all your fault!

Hey, wait a minute — where is Jimmy? Oh, you know, just leaving his palatial Greenpoint apartment with all his belongings packed in a few suitcases… uh oh. Is he running away to join Dev and Ellis and Leo in Hated Smash Character Siberia?

No, he’s just heading to tea at Tom’s apartment. (Aw, remember our season 1 drinking game? There’s tea! Everybody swig!) Clearly, though, Jimmy also has something else up his sleeve — during the tea party, he tells Julia that if Kyle wins Best Book, he wants her to accept the award on his friend’s behalf. It’s looking an awful lot like Jimmy might be skipping town before the Tonys… that is, until he arrives at Karen’s just in time for the show. Well. I’m glad we figured that out so quickly.

Welcome, everyone, to the 67th Annual Tony Awards, a ceremony with no host, about 100 guests, and zero nominated plays! Stil, you’ve got to admire the efficiency of this episode. In short order, we see Daisy nab the Featured Actress award (… over not only Megan Hilty but also Bernadette Peters. Like, the voters remember how she got this part, right?), Kyle get his posthumous prize, Jimmy deliver a surprisingly heartfelt and moving speech, and Tom and Julia win the Original Score statuette they so richly deserve. A moment of silent, respectful awe, please, for Shaiman and Wittman, Smash‘s true superheroes. Also: The way that these two keep joking together, unaware that they’ve been declared winners, really brings back the good old days of their best friendship.

Bombshell has only barely broken Hit List‘s winning streak when Derek wins the Choreography award… for Hit List. Does the audience smell a sweep? Anyway, Derek surprises everyone by actually showing up to accept the honor in person. His peers are this close to tossing tomatoes at him, yet the majority of them still voted in his favor even after the Daisy story broke out. Capriciousness, thy name is theater people!

Backstage, Derek realizes that he can’t really make up for what he did to Ana — but he can manage the next best thing, which is making Daisy feel really, really awful. He removes the newly-minted Tony winner’s “Reach For Me” harness, lets her know that she’s not going to perform after all, and paves the way for Karen and the Hit List crew to put on an impromptu, a cappella version of “Broadway, Here I Come” instead. The bad news: Some poor crew members spent hours rigging up Cirque du Soleil silks for no damn reason. The good news: The cast’s Stomp-inspired beat is cheesy but cute, the vocals all sound great, and it’s an appropriate way to bookend the season. Remember Jimmy singing this song alone (or so he thought) at the bar? We were so young then!

Immediately, though, I forget about how much I liked the number… because it’s Best Actress time. All our lives, we were only waiting for this moment to arrive. Some people wait a lifetime for a moment like this. Just a moment… one peculiar passing moment… ahem. We of course cut to a commercial before can learn whether Karen or Ivy is victorious. (Thank Sondheim that Safran didn’t decide to punish us by cutting to black, Sopranos-style.) And then the show returns, only to reveal that…

NEXT: I mean, I already wrote who wins at the top of the recap. But if you’ve forgotten already…

IT’S IVY! IVY GETS THE TONY! FOUR ONE FOR YOU, IVY! It was not until this very moment that I realized how completely invested I still am in Smash, and how much I’ll truly miss it once it’s gone forever. Broadway’s pregnant princess strides up to the podium, where she accepts the prize that was always hers and praises the people, both little and big, who have helped her achieve this milestone: “The magnificent Leigh Conroy, for giving me a life in the theater. Tom Levitt, for being an amazing friend until he suddenly wasn’t. Josh Safran, for allowing me to be much more likable this season, though I personally could have done without the whole baby thing.” The only way I could be happier right now would be if Terrible Ellis suddenly scuttled out from underneath the stage, snatched away Ivy’s trophy, unfurled his leathery wings, and flew with the statuette into the balcony, where — after unleashing a single, piercing cry — he disappeared in a puff of smoke.

Sigh. Clearly, that marginally amusing paragraph is my way of treading water, because I don’t want to admit that the episode — the season — the series — is almost over. Anyhow, we don’t get to see Best Director presented — but we do watch Rosie O’Donnell announce proudly that Bombshell has managed to wrest Best Musical from Hit List‘s edgy, iPad-encrusted grasp. It had to end this way, as this ended up being the series finale. And as our onetime heroes hold their awards aloft, basking in the applause of an unfortunately puny-sounding audience, it’s almost possible to hear an echo of the show Smash always wanted to be.

All that’s left to do is wrap up everybody’s storylines — and, of course, pair the spares. Tom and Julia are approached about writing a movie musical — by none other than Patrick Dillon, the cute closeted dude who would have been Tom’s love interest in season 3. Their separation, it seems, is off; better finish writing that Gatsby play anyway, Julia! Tom and Patrick kiss; Julia, during the final montage, surprises Michael Swift with a visit, which, eh. We don’t see Ivy actually tell Derek about the baby — but from the way he’s gently touching her belly, it seems like he’s finally chosen the blond Marilyn over the brunette. Eileen is once again dating bartender Nick, freed from prison and ready to make some more shady deals.

And speaking of shadiness: More Jimmy backstory, because that’s exactly what season 2 didn’t have enough of! As he tells Karen, five years ago, he watched a girl overdose and ran away instead of helping her. That decision haunted him… but thanks to Karen’s good influence, he’s finally decided to turn himself in. Because the girl didn’t actually die — hooray, no real consequences! — Jimmy will just have to serve 6 to 18 months in jail. And all the while, Karen will be waiting for him, sniffin’ and hopin’ and thinkin’ and prayin’ that one day she learns his actual name.

Which leads us back to where the recap began: “Big Finish,” the Karen/Ivy duet that plays Smash out. Why are these two actresses singing the Tonys’ closing song? Why, especially, are they doing it in front of a sign that says Smash? When did they rehearse this, and when did Tom and Julia write it, and why didn’t we know it was happening until the moment it did? Who cares — the number is old-fashioned, catchy, performed with panache… and fairly nonsensical, which is always how I’ve preferred my Smash. Farewell, my Broadway babies: You certainly left me wanting more.

It’s the laaaaast Footlights:

– Is “Under Pressure” the first time we’ve ever seen Derek sing? Is it okay that during it, he kind of reminded me of Spike performing “Rest in Peace” during “Once More, With Feeling”?

– “Now’s not the time to get fat, my dear!” “Taaaake tiiiime off!” Bernadette Peters, you beautiful monster. Please play Megan Hilty’s mother on her next TV series. Also, here’s the full version of the Tony acceptance speech she was making Ivy watch — guess Leigh, too, starred in Annie Get Your Gun.

– I know we’re not supposed to, since she got the guy and everything — but man, I do worry about what’l happen to Ivy’s career once she has that kid. This does, however, mean that someone could conceivably reboot Smash 25 years from now, revolving the show around Liberace or Liberacia Lynn-Wills’s bed-hopping Broadway adventures. Note to the future: Make this show.

– Ivy: “Let’s Be Bad.” Karen: “I’m Not Sorry.” They’re song titles — and things both characters commonly say in conversation!

– We catch a glimpse at an article about Daisy that trumpets her journey “from victim to vixen.” Maybe this sort of explains why she hasn’t been blacklisted from Broadway society like Derek has… but wait, no it doesn’t. Why don’t people seem to care that she blackmailed him?

– Here is a thing that Josh Safran had to cut from the finale, due to time: At the Tony afterparty, an agent played by Nadia Dajani approaches Karen and tells her, “I I know you didn’t win tonight, but I want to tell you I think you’re incredible and I don’t just think you’re a stage star — I think you’re a movie star.” I’m so glad this didn’t make it in; after watching it, I may have gone blind on account of excessive eye-rolling.

– That moment was meant to set up season 3. Here’s the rest of what Safran dreamed up: The season would indeed have revolved around the making of a movie musical, one “still using Broadway actors, still using Broadway stages; maybe it would have even been set in the world of Broadway.” Tom and Derek would fight over directing the film, while Jimmy would write its score with Julia. (From jail, or…?) Michael Swift was going to go through some “image rehab” after Julia found out that she had to work with him, then realized she was still in love with him. Tom was going to struggle with dating closeted Patrick. Eileen would have been given a “powerful film producer” love interest, “sort of a Harvey Weinstein.” Ivy… would still be on the show as well, though Safran doesn’t reveal much more than that. But hey, she’ll always have that Tony.

And so we face the final curtain

My friends, I’ll say it clear

I’ll state my case, of which I’m certain

We’ve watched a show of fools

Who both lit and stunk up the airwaves

But in the end, who cares: They did it theeeeiiiiir way.

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‘Smash,’ NBC Musical’s 2nd Season, With Jennifer Hudson ...

04-02-2013 · The creator and primary writer of “Smash,” the playwright Theresa Rebeck, left after the first season, and the show is now in the hands of Joshua Safran, who was a …

04-02-2013

The conventional wisdom about the first season of “Smash,” NBC’s musical within a soap opera, was that it started on a high note it couldn’t sustain. The pilot received overwhelmingly positive reviews, but by the last episode it was hard to find anyone who would say a kind word about the show. People were more likely to be tweeting about a misbegotten musical number or how much they hated Ellis, the personal assistant who filled the obligatory young Machiavellian schemer role in the style of “All About Eve.”

The only problem with that take on “Smash” — which begins its second season with a two-hour premiere on Tuesday — is that the show was no good right from the start.

The melodramatic excesses meant to entertain us during the seemingly endless gestation of the fictional (for now) musical “Bombshell” were never the real problem. The surprising thing about “Smash” was that a show meant to capture the magic of live theater could be so lifeless: flatly written, with a creeping sanctimoniousness and a middlebrow sensibility that seemed to reflect Hollywood’s idea of what would please a Wednesday matinee audience.

All those qualities were present in the ballyhooed first episode, whose polish and catchy original song (“Let Me Be Your Star,” by Marc Shaiman and Scott Wittman) didn’t hide the two-dimensionality of the characters and an overall tenor that was less Broadway spectacular than basic-cable mini-series. (And despite a change in show runners, the addition of some high-profile stage actors and the departure of Ellis, Season 2 looks like more of the same.)

Jennifer Hudson adds some star quality as a Broadway diva on the new season of “Smash,” the theater-musical-within-a-soap-opera series on NBC.Credit...Will Hart/NBC

It was also clear from the start that several key roles were not well cast. Debra Messing can be a charming comedian, but the suggestion of a complicated inner life is not part of her repertory, and she’s not very convincing in the part of a top Broadway lyricist. It doesn’t help that she was saddled with the most onerous of the first season’s tedious and nonsensical subplots, which wrapped together adoption, infidelity and a difficult teenage son. (One of the showbiz truisms the characters like to throw around is that putting on a musical leaves no time for a personal life; unfortunately that hasn’t been true.)

Also problematic was the casting of Katharine McPhee, the 2006 “American Idol” runner-up, in the central role of Karen, the unknown from Iowa who competed to play Marilyn Monroe in the biographical musical “Bombshell” and who won the part, at least temporarily, at the end of last season. Ms. McPhee can sing well enough, and she looks good in a platinum-blonde wig, but she’s a limited actress and never captured the vividness and vulnerability of Monroe — not in her musical numbers, where you’d expect it, or as the offstage Karen, where it would be a nice bonus.

Megan Hilty, who plays Ivy, Karen’s rival in the show’s odd dueling-ingénues setup — two Eves in search of a Margo — is a more accomplished stage performer and a more natural actress than Ms. McPhee, but she doesn’t make you say, “That’s Marilyn!” either. Given the sadistic way the story lines have treated Ivy, who can’t quite measure up to Karen’s Midwestern goodness, that could just mean that Ms. Hilty is doing exactly what’s required of her.

“Smash” was supposed to be the show that got Broadway right while taking the karaoke inclinations of “American Idol” and “Glee” and turning them into respectable adult drama. But Broadway is a vicious, thrilling, glamorous place, and “Smash,” beyond some outré moments, has been small, wan and polite, more Hallmark than Bob Fosse. One sign of this is that what we’re told often doesn’t match with what we can see and hear. The director Derek (Jack Davenport, giving the show’s most consistently watchable performance) declares that Karen is Marilyn, but we can see that she isn’t. Everyone says “Bombshell” is great, but after 15 episodes it has barely come into focus, and the decent numbers we see are more than balanced by the harebrained ones like the “Mr. and Mrs. Smith” duet for Monroe and DiMaggio.

The creator and primary writer of “Smash,” the playwright Theresa Rebeck, left after the first season, and the show is now in the hands of Joshua Safran, who was a producer on “Gossip Girl.” The early episodes of the new season feature a big guest star — Jennifer Hudson, playing a Broadway diva — reflecting the clout and budget of a show that counts Steven Spielberg among its producers. Also joining the cast is the young Broadway leading man Jeremy Jordan (“Newsies,” “Bonnie & Clyde”), giving a promising performance as a prickly songwriter.

But there are not many signs that the show is taking a turn toward anything better — more realism, more audacity, less sentimentality. Ms. Messing’s Julia continues to struggle with her writing, not because writing is hard but because her marriage is messed up. Characters still say things like: “I’m your muse. It’s what we do.” Budding talents are still discovered at Schwab’s, or in this case after closing time on Restaurant Row in Manhattan. You could excuse all this stuff by saying, “Hey, it’s a musical.” But the more depressing truth is that it’s just a TV show.

Now is a perfect time to embrace the chaos of NBC's …

24-04-2020 · Now is a perfect time to embrace the chaos of 'Smash'. In times that feel as absurd as a TV show, there's no better move than embracing a show that …

24-04-2020

In times that feel as absurd as a TV show, there's no better move than embracing a show that was absurd to begin with. Enter NBC's Smash, an unhinged TV musical that debuted in 2012 and embraced a swift slide into madness.

Back then, watching it was enough to make you feel you'd lost your mind. But in 2020, it might be the perfect fantasy antidote to everything else.

Smash follows the creation of a Marilyn Monroe musical on Broadway, from the first seeds of an idea voiced by an audacious music assistant to a cast workshop to an off-Broadway debut. We follow Bombshell to the stage through its writer, composer, director, producer, and the two women who vied to portray Monroe herself: Ivy Lynn (Megan Hilty) and Karen Cartwright (Katharine McPhee).

Smash came at a time when America needed it desperately, but was not ready to receive such a gift. Glee had dipped from its early glory, leaving many former viewers feeling empty and betrayed. They (we) yearned for a musical TV show, but whomst was brave enough to take the mantle? And as writer Julia (Debra Messing) notes in the Smash pilot, the timing was eerily fortuitous for a show about Marilyn Monroe, with films like My Week With Marilyn bringing her legend back to the cultural forefront.

Nothing but respect for my Marilyn!

Nothing but respect for my Marilyn! Credit: Dreamworks Tv / Storyline Entertainment / Ums / Kobal / Shutterstock

There can be no enjoying Smash, at least not unironically, without somehow digesting the depraved false equivalence of Ivy and Karen vying for this role. Ivy (and Hilty) is experienced with stage musicals, belting Marc Shaiman and Scott Wittman’s original songs for the show so fully that you’ll feel them in your bones even from the living room sofa. McPhee, a former American Idol winner, works perfectly as what that show trained her to do: Record pop songs. Her voice is smooth and breathy, ideal for a playback and entirely amiss amid a chorus of dancers waiting for a vibrato that will never come.

"I have a pretty clear idea what I bring to the party," -Ivy Lynn, an icon, on Smash

Once you accept that pretense, the other madness is positively breezy. Season 1 is notorious for producer Eileen's (Anjelica Huston) lowlife assistant Ellis (Jaime Cepero), whose penchant for eavesdropping and manipulation would give a young Thomas from Downton Abbey a run for his supper. There's also Julia's teen son who looks 40 (I looked it up, he was 22) — a career-worst performance from Emory Cohen, which I feel fine saying now that he's done work like Brooklyn and is probably fine. Both characters are unceremoniously dumped by Season 2 with no explanation, not that we need one.

Despite being the more experienced performer, Ivy snaps quickly to diva status when she lands the lead for a Bombshell workshop. It doesn't help that she's now dating director Derek (Jack Davenport) and is extra-sensitive to even breathing the same air as Karen, whether she's singing too loud, over-performing, or slowing things down. Ivy's poker face is so dismal that Derek should consider recasting her on acting ability alone.

Ivy isn’t entirely in the wrong here. The show often paints her as an antiheroine to deepen the divide between these women for drama’s sake — two women who, had either of them been a real professional, might’ve put their differences aside for the good of the performance. This might be dramatic, but a column about Smash seems like the best place for it: When you’re part of a team, you lift each other up. The strongest bond between sports and arts, between the Monroes and DiMaggios of the world, is working with others toward something that’s bigger than all of you.

Nick Jonas is randomly in this show! I don't know!!

Nick Jonas is randomly in this show! I don't know!! Credit: Dreamworks Tv / Storyline Entertainment / Ums / Kobal / Shutterstock

If you're going watch or rewatch Smash, you must prepare for the inevitable heartbreak. The show is at least responsible enough to dole out its batshit in incremental doses throughout the first season, but Season 2 falls apart faster than Ellis leaking a secret.

There are even more shameless pop covers, and while Hilty's take on Robyn's "Dancing On My Own" in a dream sequence will never be unwelcome anywhere, these songs feel forced alongside actual diegetic originals. Then again, Season 2 also brings in Jeremy Jordan and the new musical Hit List, with music and lyrics by Marc Shaiman, Scott Wittman, Drew Gasparini, Joe Iconis, Andrew McMahon, Benj Pasek, Justin Paul, and Lucie Silvas. I haven't listened to "Heart-Shaped Wreckage" since 2013 because I know I'll cry off my eye makeup if it plays on shuffle, and that, my friends, is self care.

Love triangles — or perhaps "sex triangles" is more apt — crop up without warning or buildup. Already unbalanced characters unravel even further. It's Karen in the lead, or is it Ivy, and where's Rebecca (Uma Thurman), and who's Derek sleeping with this week? There's a death, a near-murder, multiple coups, arrest, unplanned pregnancy (I haven't even mentioned the "Bollywood" atrocity but believe me, I have thoughts) — and still, eight years later, fans shake their heads that Karen and Ivy were ever the final two choices for Marilyn.

It takes a measure of skill to make a show that memorable on its premise alone without getting into the bizarre details. But that's Broadway, baby, and that's Smash.

Stream all of Smash now on NBC's website or apps.

'Smash' Musical Coming to Broadway From Steven …

21-05-2020 · 'Smash,' a musical based on beloved NBC Series, is eyeing a Broadway run. Steven Spielberg, Bob Greenblatt, Neil Meron producing the show. ‘Smash’ Musical Coming to …

21-05-2020

Talk about meta.

“Smash,” the TV series about backstage drama that attracted a rabid but small fanbase when it aired for two seasons on NBC, has inspired an upcoming show that is eyeing a Broadway run. “Smash, A New Musical” is setting its sights on the Great White Way and its mega-watt producing team includes Steven Spielberg, WarnerMedia Entertainment chairman Robert Greenblatt, and “Chicago” producer Neil Meron.

The Tony and Grammy-winning duo of Marc Shaiman and Scott Wittman, who penned over two dozen songs for the television show will provide the score, which will feature many of the songs that popped up on the TV series.

Like the series, the stage show will follow the efforts to mount “Bombshell,” the Broadway musical-within-a-musical about the life of Marilyn Monroe. However, its backers said the plot will also deviate from that of the series. Some characters such as writers Julia and Tom (played by Debra Messing and Christian Borle on the small screen), as well as stars Ivy and Karen (portrayed on TV by Megan Hilty and Katharine McPhee) will still be central to the storyline. Other details are being kept under wraps, presumably until opening night.

The musical’s book will be co-written by Tony winner Bob Martin (“The Prom”) and Tony-nominated Rick Elice (“Peter and the Starcatcher”). “Smash’s” Emmy-winning choreographer Joshua Bergasse will reprise his role for the stage musical.

“I am personally thrilled to be a part of this musical and its road to Broadway,” said Spielberg, whose original idea led to the NBC series. “’Smash’ is near and dear to my heart, and it seems fitting that a new musical inspired by what we did on the show would eventually come to the stage. I’m beyond thrilled to be working with this incredible creative team and my producing partners, who began the ‘Smash’ journey with me over ten years ago.”

Among the songs that Shaiman and Wittman wrote for “Smash” that will appear on the in the show is “Let Me Be Your Star.”

“Smash” was well-received by critics when it debuted in 2012, but it was also beset by its own backstage dramas, including clashes between the creative team and the show’s creator Theresa Rebeck that led to her exit. The ratings also declined as the series went on, though that was in part due to a time slot shift between the first and second seasons.

The series’ circle of supporters has expanded since it began appearing on streaming platforms, transforming it into a cult favorite. This won’t be the first time “Smash” has been reconfigured for the stage. The cast performed an elaborate benefit concert of the songs from Bombshell at the Minskoff Theatre in June 2015 which sold out in fifteen minutes. It was filmed but never shown until this week, when it was streamed in its entirety on People.com as a corona virus benefit for The Actors Fund.

Of course, several hurdles remain until “Smash” can come full circle. Namely, Broadway remains closed due to the coronavirus and it’s unclear when it will be safe for theaters to reopen.

Watch the “Smash” reunion and live “Bombshell” performance here. 

Smash | NBC Wiki

Smash was an American musical-drama series that premiered on Syndication from February 6, 2012. It was broadcast in the US by Syndication and produced by DreamWorks Television and Universal Television. The show featured a large ensemble cast that was led by Debra Messing, Jack Davenport, Katharine McPhee, Christian Borle, Megan Hilty and Anjelica Huston. The …

The topic of this page has a wikia of its own: Smash Wiki.

Smash was an American musical-drama series that premiered on Syndication from February 6, 2012. It was broadcast in the US by Syndication and produced by DreamWorks Television and Universal Television.

The show featured a large ensemble cast that was led by Debra Messing, Jack Davenport, Katharine McPhee, Christian Borle, Megan Hilty and Anjelica Huston.

The show debuted on February 6, 2012, and its first season ended on May 14, 2012. Its second season premiered on February 5, 2013, and ended on May 26, 2013. Syndication announced a change in their lineup in March 2013 and moved the show to Saturdays starting April 6, 2013.

On May 10, 2013, "Smash" was officially cancelled on May 10, 2013. Second-season executive producer-show runner Josh Safran said the final episode of season two worked as a series finale.

Plot[]

The show revolves around a group of characters creating new Broadway musicals where everyone must balance his or her often chaotic personal life with the all-consuming demands of life in the theater.

The series features original music by composers Marc Shaiman and Scott Wittman.

Cast[]

  • Debra Messing as Julia Houston
  • Anjelica Huston as Eileen Rand
  • Jack Davenport as Derek Wills
  • Katharine McPhee as Karen Cartwright
  • Christian Borle as Tom Levitt
  • Megan Hilty as Ivy Lynn
  • Raza Jaffrey as Dev Sundaram
  • Jaime Cepero as Ellis Tancharoen
  • Brian d'Arcy James as Frank Houston

'Smash' Musical Drama Now Available on NBC.com and Hulu ...

The pilot episode of the new hour-long musical drama "Smash" — the scripted TV series about theatre people putting together a new Broadway musical — is now available via online streaming ...

As previously reported, "Smash," which will make its network debut at 10 PM (ET) Feb. 6 on NBC-TV, was launched Jan. 16 through digital services. Read the first Playbill "SMASH" REPORT, a recap of (and comments about) the show's pilot.

"Smash" is available on multiple platforms including Apple iTunes, Amazon Video on Demand, Xbox/Zune, Playstation, Samsung MediaHub and Vudu. As of Jan. 23, the pilot became available for online streaming via NBC.com and Hulu.

Click here to download via iTunes. Click here to download "Smash" on Amazon.

"Smash" was seen in public "consumer screenings" in ten major markets on Jan. 9 in Chicago, Los Angeles, Atlanta, Dallas, Denver, Minneapolis, Philadelphia, Phoenix, Portland and San Francisco. In Chicago, NBC had some of the cast and creative team on hand for a Q & A after the screening followed by a reception. On Jan. 11, there was a focus on the LGBT community at the Outfest Screening in Los Angeles.

From Jan. 15-30, selected American Airlines flights will show in-flight screenings of the pilot. Read the Playbill feature that introduces you to the characters of "Smash."

*

The scripted drama about the subculture of musical theatre people is the brainchild of Steven Spielberg. Pulitzer Prize finalist Theresa Rebeck (Mauritius, "NYPD Blue") penned the pilot episode and is the series creator. The pilot is directed by Tony Award winner Michael Mayer (Spring Awakening, American Idiot).

smashrecap4.jpg
Debra Messing and Brian d'Arcy James
photo by Will Hart/NBC

NBC bills it this way: "'Smash' is a musical drama that celebrates the beauty and heartbreak of the Broadway theatre as it follows a cross-section of dreamers and schemers who all have one common desire — to be a 'Smash.' The series centers on a desire to create a Broadway musical based on the life of Marilyn Monroe — written by the successful songwriting duo of Tom (Tony Award nominee Christian Borle of Legally Blonde: The Musical) and Julia (Emmy Award winner Debra Messing of 'Will & Grace'). Julia recently began the process of adopting a child with her husband of many years, but her focus is torn when she has the opportunity to write another Broadway hit. A rivalry soon forms for the lead role between a youthful, inexperienced Midwestern beauty (Katharine McPhee, 'American Idol') — who is trying to find fame in the big city against all odds — and stage veteran (Megan Hilty of 9 to 5: The Musical), who's determined to leave the chorus line and finally get her big break. A tenacious producer Eileen (Oscar winner Anjelica Huston, 'Prizzi's Honor') discovers the Marilyn project and jumps on board with a brilliant director (Jack Davenport, 'Pirates of the Caribbean' films) — whose talent is matched by his cunning and egocentric amorality."

Executive producer is multiple Emmy and Oscar winner Steven Spielberg ("ER," "Schindler's List"). Craig Zadan and Neil Meron (Oscar-winning "Chicago," "Hairspray") and Darryl Frank and Justin Falvey ("United States of Tara," "The Borgias") also serve as executive producers. Original songs are written by Tony and Grammy Award winners Marc Shaiman and Scott Wittman (Hairspray, Catch Me If You Can), who also serve as executive producers.

"Smash" is a production of Universal Media Studios in association with DreamWorks.

Don't expect characters to burst into songs, movie-musical style (or as they do on the TV hit "Glee"). All singing in "Smash" is expected to be in the context of performance/rehearsal/audition/recording situations. Said songs might be sweetened, however: A clip, apparently from the pilot, has surfaced, featuring Katharine McPhee's character in a piano-and-voice audition that morphs into a fantastically lit performance sweetened with orchestra, apparently to reflect what the industry folk in the room are seeing in their imaginations (musical fantasy elements like in the film "Chicago" will surface from time to time).

Check out Playbill Video's interviews with the cast and creatives of "Smash":

Watch Smash cast reunion and Bombshell concert event

Smash was a scripted NBC drama about the creation of fictional Broadway musical Bombshell, the story of the life of Marilyn Monroe. The series ran on NBC for two seasons, ending its run in 2013 ...

Fade in on a girl trying to get through quarantine...

Let the cast of Smash be your star in a special reunion and one-night-only streaming event of Bombshell in Concert. The event, announced by The Actors Fund in association with PEOPLE, will feature a reunion of much of the cast of the NBC seriesas well as the first-ever airing of the live Bombshell in Concert event. The concert, featuring songs from the series, was a special sold-out event at Broadway's Minskoff Theater back in 2015.

Oscar-winner Renée Zellweger will introduce the performance. Additionally, Julie Klausner of Difficult People will host a live reunion during the concert's intermission with original cast members, including Christian Borle, Jaime Cepero, Will Chase, Brian d'Arcy James, Jack Davenport, Ann Harada, Megan Hilty, Jeremy Jordan, Katharine McPhee, Andy Mientus, Debra Messing, Leslie Odom Jr., Krysta Rodriguez, and Wesley Taylor.

Smash was a scripted NBC drama about the creation of fictional Broadway musical Bombshell, the story of the life of Marilyn Monroe. The series ran on NBC for two seasons, ending its run in 2013.

The special event streams Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET and will benefit The Actors Fund, striving to help artists in need during the coronavirus crisis. This continues Bombshell in Concert's association with The Actors Fund, as the 2015 live concert was also a benefit for the arts organization.

“I speak for Neil Meron and our wonderful creative team of Marc Shaiman, Scott Wittman and Joshua Bergasse, and we are thrilled to help raise more money for the Actor’s Fund and all their good work during this difficult time," said producer Bob Greenblatt in a statement. "Smash and Bombshell in Concert were thrilling experiences for us, and we are overjoyed that fans everywhere will get to finally see these amazing performances. We’re grateful to everyone at The Actors Fund and PEOPLE for their love of the performing arts.”

Watch the reunion and concert in the video above.

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  • Best Episode: ''The Dress Rehearsal'' (season 2, episode 11, shown) Hillary Busis: '' Bombshell 's script has the president kiss Marilyn, then dismiss her as…
    S2 E11 Recap
  • S2 E10 Recap
  • Smash 209 The Parents Recap
    S2 E9 Recap
  • S2 E8 Recap
  • S2 E7 Recap
  • S2 E6 Recap
  • S2 E5 Recap
  • S2 E4 Recap
  • S2 E3 Recap
  • Smash Premiere Jennifer Hudson
    S2 E1 Recap
  • S1 E15 Recap
  • S1 E14 Recap
  • S1 E13 Recap
  • S1 E12 Recap
  • S1 E11 Recap
  • S1 E10 Recap
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Catch Up With the 'Smash' TV Cast Before the Drama Hits ...

Like the TV show, Smash: A New Musical will focus on putting together a fictional Broadway musical titled Bombshell and will feature the characters Julia (played on the TV show by Debra Messing ...

Smash - Katharine McPhee, Megan Hilty

Talk about “bombshell” news: The cancelled-too-soon NBC drama Smash is headed to Broadway!

Like the TV show, Smash: A New Musical will focus on putting together a fictional Broadway musical titled Bombshell and will feature the characters Julia (played on the TV show by Debra Messing), Tom (Christian Borle), Ivy (Megan Hilty), and Karen (Katharine McPhee), but the upcoming production will also “depart liberally from the series,” according to Broadway.com.

5 TV Musical Solos That'll Knock You off Your FeetSee Also

Rachel Bloom, Naya Rivera, Jussie Smollett and others will blow you away in these five must-see TV musical solos.

The musical news came a day after People and The Actors Fund live-streamed a Smash cast reunion and a filmed version of the 2015 Bombshell in Concert Broadway event.

The big question now is, will any of the TV cast be in the Broadway production? Until we know, you can catch up with the series regulars and see what they’ve been doing in the seven years since the show went off the air.

Smash Debra Messing

After Smash, Messing headlined the NBC procedural The Mysteries of Laura; starred in the TV version of Dirty Dancing; and returned to her most famous role, Grace Adler, in NBC’s revival of Will & Grace, earning a ninth Golden Globe nomination in the process.

Smash Jack Davenport

Davenport has played two notable husbands in recent years: Jennifer Aniston’s estranged spouse in The Morning Show and Lucy Liu’s in Why Women Kill.

Smash Katharine McPhee

McPhee, who rose to fame as an American Idol runner-up, starred as Paige Dineen in the CBS action series Scorpion. In 2019, she married music producer David Foster.

Smash Christian Borle

Since Smash, Borle has starred in The Sound of Music Live! and Peter Pan Live!, reunited with real-life ex-wife Sutton Foster in Gilmore Girls: A Year in the Life and Younger, and appeared in Something Rotten and Falsettos on Broadway.

Smash Megan Hilty

Hilty starred in Noises Off on Broadway (and earned a Tony nomination for her performance), guest-starred on both The Good Wife and The Good Fight, and played Patsy Cline in the Lifetime biopic Patsy & Loretta.

Smash Angelica Huston

Huston, known for her Oscar-winning turn in Prizzi’s Honor, has recently appeared in John Wick: Chapter 3 – Parabellum and guest-starred in BoJack Horseman, Transparent, and Angie Tribeca.

Smash Jeremy Jordan

Jordan starred in the films The Last 5 Years and American Son and in the first three seasons of Supergirl. In 2019, he returned to Broadway in the show Waitress.

Smash Leslie Odom Jr.

Odom achieved Broadway glory with his performance as Aaron Burr in the hit musical Hamilton, a role for which he won the 2016 Tony Award for Best Actor in a Musical. On the big screen, he’s appeared in the films Murder on the Orient Express and Harriet.

Smash Andy Mientus

Mientus has spent his post-Smash career appearing in Les Misérables and Spring Awakening on Broadway, starring in the WGN America drama Gone, and recurring as Hartley Rathaway/Pied Piper on The Flash. In 2016, he married actor and director Michael Arden.

Smash Krysta Rodriguez

Coincidentally, Rodriguez costarred with Mientus in the revival of Spring Awakening. She also starred in the NBC mockumentary Trial & Error and in the Netflix post-apocalyptic dramedy Daybreak.

Smash Jaime Cepero

Cepero led the cast of a re-staging of the Broadway musical Hair in Texas in 2017, co-headlined the Off-Broadway production Night of the Living Dead! The Musical! in 2019, and starred in a reimagining of the Broadway musical Godspell in Connecticut this year.

Smash Raza Jaffrey

After Smash, Jaffrey starred in Code Black and The Enemy Within, recurred on Homeland and Lost in Space, and appeared in the film The Rhythm Section. In 2014, he married fellow Spooks alum Lara Pulver.

Smash Brian d'Arcy James

James has starred in the Broadway productions Something Rotten, Hamilton, and The Ferryman; the films Spotlight, Molly’s Game, and First Man; and the Netflix drama 13 Reasons Why.

Smash - NBC
The Music of Smash [Original TV Soundtrack]

NBC's musical-within-a-musical TV series Smash was often called "Glee for grown-ups," and while the comparison rang true in many ways, Smash made a name for itself with mostly original songs instead of borderline-kitschy versions of established hits. This was a brave move, but as The Music of Smash shows, it didn't

NBC's musical-within-a-musical TV series Smash was often called "Glee for grown-ups," and while the comparison rang true in many ways, Smash made a name for itself with mostly original songs instead of borderline-kitschy versions of established hits. This was a brave move, but as The Music of Smash shows, it didn't always pay off. Having the cast members perform songs about their lives outside of Bombshell, the Marilyn Monroe musical that they're trying to get off the ground -- as well as songs from that show -- means double the opportunity for different kinds of songs. The results feel like a mishmash of Broadway and pop styles from over the decades: the songs about the cast, which largely focus on the hopes and dreams of rival Marilyn wannabes Karen (Katharine McPhee) and Ivy (Megan Hilty), have a contemporary feel that ranges from earnest, Rent-like songs such as "Stand" and "Who You Are" to the Lady Gaga-esque dance-pop of "Touch Me" and Top 40 fodder "Brighter Than the Sun." This radio-friendly feel isn't a surprise, considering that Smash hired a slew of hitmakers like Ryan Tedder and Carrie Underwood to pen these songs. However, more than a few are pleasant but bland; it's telling that one of the standout moments is McPhee's version of Christina Aguilera's "Beautiful," which has become something of a modern standard. Bombshell's songs, which were written by Grammy and Tony Award-winning composer Marc Shaiman, are more memorable and allow the cast to have some fun and explore their own dreams as well as Marilyn's. "Let Me Be Your Star" swoons and soars like a Disney princess theme song, while the sentimentality that lingered around the more contemporary-sounding songs comes to the fore (in a good way) on "Mr. & Mrs. Smith." A Chicago-style brassiness dominates "The 20th Century Fox Mambo" and "Let's Be Bad," both of which sound the most like genuine show tunes. Fans who purchase this won't be disappointed, but The Music of Smash's varied styles and song quality often feel like the show is trying to have something for everyone -- but truly pleasing no one in the end.

tvshows.alphacoders.com

Smash is an American musical drama television series created by playwright Theresa Rebeck and developed by Robert Greenblatt for NBC. Steven Spielberg served as one of the executive producers. The series was broadcast in the US by NBC and produced by DreamWorks Television and Universal Television.

Smash is an American musical drama television series created by playwright Theresa Rebeck and developed by Robert Greenblatt for NBC. Steven Spielberg served as one of the executive producers. The series was broadcast in the US by NBC and produced by DreamWorks Television and Universal Television. The series revolves around a fictional New York theater community and specifically the creation of a new Broadway musical. It features a large ensemble cast, led by Debra Messing, Jack Davenport, Katharine McPhee, Christian Borle, Megan Hilty, Jeremy Jordan, and Anjelica Huston. The show debuted on February 6, 2012, and its first season ended on May 14, 2012. Its second and final season premiered on February 5, 2013 and ended on May 26, 2013. NBC announced a change in their lineup in March 2013 and moved the show to Saturdays starting April 6, 2013. The series was officially cancelled on May 10, 2013. Second and final season executive producer/show runner Josh Safran said the final episode of season two would work as a series finale, should the series not be renewed. The series, particularly the pilot episode, enjoyed some critical success. The first season received the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Choreography amongst 4 nominations. The series was also nominated for a Golden Globe Award for Best Television Series – Musical or Comedy and a Grammy Award for Best Song Written for Visual Media.


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Smash (NBC)

Mar 22, 2016 - Explore Anne Elizabeth's board "Smash (NBC)", followed by 134 people on Pinterest. See more ideas about smash, nbc, megan hilty.

Broadway, Here I Come
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Bombshell numbers #Smash Numbers, Hollywood, Eyes
SMASH TV Show Extended Trailer

28-11-2011 · Smash TV show extended trailer. A beautiful extended trailer for NBC's upcoming musical series Smash starring Katharine McPhee and Debra Messing. Yes that headline is meant to be literal as series ...

28-11-2011

Smash TV show extended trailer. A beautiful extended trailer for NBC's upcoming musical series Smash starring Katharine McPhee and Debra Messing.

Yes that headline is meant to be literal as series star Katharine McPhee belts out a cover of Christina Aguilera's hit song Beautiful, but honestly, the trailer for Smash is actually quite a solid presentation of a show that looks like it's going to be much more than Glee for adults. From executive producer Steven Spielberg, the series follows Karen Cartwright (McPhee), a young girl from Iowa with a dream of making it on Broadway. While a veteran of the stage seems like an obvious choice to take the lead role in a new musical based on the life of Marilyn Monroe, a songwriting team (Debra Messing and Christian Borle) and their tenacious producer (Anjelica Huston) just might see something in Cartwright and kick off a new chapter in all of their lives. Watch the music video style trailer for Smash after the jump.

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Smash (TV show): Info, opinions and more

Smash is an American musical drama television series created by playwright Theresa Rebeck and developed by Robert Greenblatt for NBC. Steven Spielberg served as one of the executive producers. The series was broadcast in the US by NBC and produced by DreamWorks Television and Universal Television.

We present Smash: This is a TV show with release date in 2012 that is in its season 2 and still raises passions. The title of the OV of the TV show is the same as the one in English: ‘Smash’.

Smash

It’s always something delicate, like everything in life, to catalogue the series, but there has been selected these genres to classify it: Drama.

Finally, we give you the synopsis and everything you’re looking for about this TV show that has nothing less than a 7.7 on the prestigious IMDB page.

Smash (TV series): Synopsis

Here you have the argument of the TV show:

Smash is an American musical drama television series created by playwright Theresa Rebeck and developed by Robert Greenblatt for NBC. Steven Spielberg served as one of the executive producers. The series was broadcast in the US by NBC and produced by DreamWorks Television and Universal Television.
The series revolves around a fictional New York theater community and specifically the creation of a new Broadway musical. It features a large ensemble cast, led by Debra Messing, Jack Davenport, Katharine McPhee, Christian Borle, Megan Hilty, Jeremy Jordan, and Anjelica Huston.

The show debuted on February 6, 2012, and its first season ended on May 14, 2012. Its second and final season premiered on February 5, 2013 and ended on May 26, 2013.
NBC announced a change in their lineup in March 2013 and moved the show to Saturdays starting April 6, 2013. The series was officially cancelled on May 10, 2013. Second and final season executive producer/show runner Josh Safran said the final episode of season two would work as a series finale, should the series not be renewed.

The series, particularly the pilot episode, enjoyed some critical success.
The first season received the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Choreography amongst 4 nominations. The series was also nominated for a Golden Globe Award for Best Television Series – Musical or Comedy and a Grammy Award for Best Song Written for Visual Media.

Smash: Trailers and Videos

Actors and characters

In this fabulous story we’ve great actors as for example: Debra Messing, Jack Davenport, Katharine McPhee, Christian Borle.

In the main role of our main character (Julia Houston) the TV show has Debra Messing.
On the other hand, you’ve many other actors that you must be tired of seeing, they’ll be: Jack Davenport and Katharine McPhee, in the role of Derek Wills and Karen Cartwright respectively. They will for sure trick you! And finally, enjoy the performance of Christian Borle, Megan Hilty, Jeremy Jordanin the role of Tom Levitt, Ivy Lynn, Jimmy Collins.

Opinions and critics of the TV show Smash

Alessa, who is 34 years old, wants to tell us:

Good afternoon to the readers, my sincere congratulations for creating quality content, I’ve been writing to you for months. I really can’t it’s hard for me to accept the personality of the enemy, I don’t share an opinion with him or with the rest of the characters.

Do you need being the first to know everything about this TV show? That’s what we’re here for we take care of it. Enter your mail and we’ll send you all the updates in seconds. We won’t let you down!

Questions of Smash that we have received

Howard, who loves Netflix, asks us:

Greetings series obsessed, I’m grateful to you for being always, I’ve been on the web since relatively recently. Will we see this new season ofthe series this year? Who is the director?

Elizabeth, who has seen all the Netflix series, asks us:

Good morning FS, thank you for being always, I’ve visit you forever. Does the TV show come back for another season on Netflix? Does the TV series come back for another season?