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Super Bowl halftime show reviews 2022: Reactions to …

The Super Bowl halftime show doesn't have a set time since the length of NFL games is fluid. That said, the halftime show will likely start at or around 8 p.m. ET, as the Super Bowl will begin at ...

The Super Bowl 56 halftime show was a star-studded event featuring plenty of well-known musicians including Dr. Dre, Snoop Dogg, Eminem, Mary J. Blige, and Kendrick Lamar.

A few other special guests made some appearances as well, such as 50 Cent. 50 Cent came out and performed upside down, a callback to his classic In Da Club music video. Anderson .Paak also made a brief appearance on the drums, performing alongside Eminem later in the act.

MORE: The best, worst Super Bowl halftime performances of all time

The halftime show was somewhat centered around hip hop icon Dr. Dre. All four of the other artists have collaborated with Dre, with three of the performers all showing up on Dre's album "2001." 

Below is Sporting News' live reaction to the halftime show as well as other social media reaction from the performance.

MORE: Watch Super Bowl 56 live with fuboTV (free trial)

Super Bowl halftime show reviews, reactions

Best halftime show ever!

— James Harden (@JHarden13) February 14, 2022

OMG!!!!!!!!! WOW WOW WOW!!!!!!!! THE GREATEST HALFTIME SHOW IVE EVER SEEN!!!

— LeBron James (@KingJames) February 14, 2022

Just give me more halftime show. Forget the second half.

🔥🔥🔥🔥🔥🔥🔥🔥🔥🔥🔥🔥

— Ryan Wood (@ByRyanWood) February 14, 2022

Easily the best halftime show ever, after Prince. Yes it will launch 10000 critiques - and the NFL is beyond shady for projecting Black culture while denying Black opportunity - but that was epic.

— Dave Zirin (@EdgeofSports) February 14, 2022

The Blackest halftime show ever. The best halftime show ever.

Lived up to the billing and surpassed it.

— mike freeman (@mikefreemanNFL) February 14, 2022

That halftime show was freakin' FUN.

I want more! #SuperBowl

— Dennis Waszak Jr. (@DWAZ73) February 14, 2022

That halftime show. 🔥🔥

— Garrett Downing (@gdowning14) February 14, 2022

Seeing 50 in the halftime show 🤣 @brgridiron pic.twitter.com/ZDrnNkrukT

— Bleacher Report (@BleacherReport) February 14, 2022

Elite halftime show

— Nick Underhill (@nick_underhill) February 14, 2022

I have no trouble as an older guy appreciating this halftime show or recognizing the stars — ‘63 Impalas!!! Definitely my lane.

— Les Bowen (@LesBowen) February 14, 2022

Cap tip Dre, Snoop, Mary J, 50 Cent, Kendrick and Eminem. Terrific show. Nothing will top Prince in rain in Miami. But that was nice. #Denver7

— Troy Renck (@TroyRenck) February 14, 2022

Subtle nod to Tupac Shakur during halftime show, Dr. Dre briefly playing “I Ain’t Mad at Cha” on piano. One highlight to an incredible performance.

— Michael Gehlken (@GehlkenNFL) February 14, 2022

Damn. Damn. I think this halftime show needs to have an asterisk making sure that people realize the difference between this one and everyone every other one in the history of the Super Bowl.

Well done.

— Mark Kaboly (@MarkKaboly) February 14, 2022

Super Bowl halftime show blog

8:02 p.m.: It's officially halftime of the Super Bowl, which means the halftime show is going to start soon. Let's get hyped up.

8:10 p.m.: IT'S STARTED LET'S GO!

8:12 p.m.: Give the set design person a raise.

It’s the little elements… pic.twitter.com/YRe9HdAkhz

— Bryan Fischer (@BryanDFischer) February 14, 2022

8:13 p.m.: 50 CENT HAS ARRIVED. 50 Cent was rumored to be the special guest of the halftime show.

Wow. @50cent #PepsiHalftime pic.twitter.com/8UlJW57gEX

— NFL (@NFL) February 14, 2022

8:14 p.m.: Mary J. Blige is performing now. And she is KILLING it.

pic.twitter.com/5pHrIXU37S

— CJ Fogler AKA Perc70 #BlackLivesMatter (@cjzero) February 14, 2022

8:17 p.m.: Kendrick Lamar is on stage now and started performing m.A.A.d city. He immediately transitioned into Alright.

THIS CAMERA WORK pic.twitter.com/kSRcA786cZ

— B.W. Carlin (@BaileyCarlin) February 14, 2022

8:19 p.m.: Eminem came out and started performing Forgot About Dre for a brief moment. Then he came out and performed a decent-length version of Lose Yourself. Anderson .Paak is playing the drums for this song as well. 

8:21 p.m.: Eminem took a knee on stage during the Super Bowl in support of Colin Kapernick's protest.

Eminem took a knee on stage during the halftime show. pic.twitter.com/86FEol25Qw

— Jordan Heck (@JordanHeckFF) February 14, 2022

8:24 p.m.: And that is a wrap! The Super Bowl halftime show is finished.

Super Bowl halftime show start time

  • Time: 8 p.m. ET (estimated)
  • TV channel: NBC
  • Live streams: Peacock, fuboTV

The Super Bowl halftime show doesn't have a set time since the length of NFL games is fluid. That said, the halftime show will likely start at or around 8 p.m. ET, as the Super Bowl will begin at 6:30 p.m. ET.

The halftime show will be broadcast on NBC, which has the rights to Super Bowl 56. The performance will last about 12 or 13 minutes.

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Review: The 2022 Super Bowl Halftime Show

21-02-2022 · On Feb. 13, the 2022 Super Bowl Halftime Show boasted a first in the lineage of halftime shows. This Super Bowl Halftime Show was the first of its kind to feature an all hip hop line up of artists that included Dr. Dre, Snoop Dogg, Eminem, Mary J. Blige, and Kendrick Lamar, alongside guest appearances by 50 Cent and Anderson .Paak.

21-02-2022

A show that celebrates both the music and architecture of Compton.On Feb. 13, the 2022 Super Bowl Halftime Show boasted a first in the lineage of halftime shows. This Super Bowl Halftime Show was the first of its kind to feature an all hip hop line up of artists that included Dr. Dre, Snoop Dogg, Eminem, Mary J. Blige, and Kendrick Lamar, alongside guest appearances by 50 Cent and Anderson .Paak. Being from Los Angeles, a lot of aspects of the performance resonated with me, the most obvious being the music, but the set was the first aspect that caught both my attention and admiration.There were several elements of the set that immediately stood out, especially in comparison to previous halftime show sets. With the exception of 2021’s show headlined by The Weeknd, the stages are usually just platforms with lights that are nothing more than a canvas for the artist(s) to perform on. However, this year the set took on a life of its own, being part of the show through artist interaction with the environment and the set actively conveying the history of Compton. A notable example includes the studio mixer Dr. Dre would interact with, changing sound channels and levels throughout the performance. Another memorable example was when Eminem literally broke out of the Compton Courthouse on the left end of the stage to begin his part of the show. Speaking of a notable Compton landmark, everything about the set exuded Compton’s personality. On the field was a projection of the map of Compton. Then, on both ends of the set were the Compton Courthouse and the Martin Luther King Jr. memorial, both images synonymous with the city. Growing up at my grandma’s place I had a great view of the towering courthouse; even now I can close my eyes and picture it in my head. In between the courthouse and the memorial were other notable locations like the Tams #21 on the corner of Central and Rosecrans Ave, both streets I repeatedly crossed through. Each building on the set featured the rooftop and a hollowed-out interior, both spaces the artists could perform in. Even the interiors of the sets conveyed either the personality of Compton or the history of the artists. For example, the building that housed the mixer Dr. Dre used featured a projection of his studio and accolades. During Snoop Dogg’s performance of  “The Next Episode,” there were projections of his old album covers and music videos including the scene where he turns into a Doberman from “Who Am I (What’s My Name)?” and the cover for “Doggystyle.” Other parts of the set included projections of other notable locations like Dale’s Donuts on Atlantic and Alondra Boulevard. In sum, all of the components of the set design worked together not just to serve as a canvas, but as its own performer, speaking aloud insight into the culture and history of both Compton and its hip hop scene.

Moving on from the set to the music, all of the artists seemed to be enjoying their time there. For instance, Snoop Dogg, who looked like he felt at home “crip walking” his way throughout the set, or Dr. Dre and Anderson .Paak constantly smiling throughout the show. You could see the passion in the eyes and facial expression of Mary J. Blige as she sang the words to “No More Drama,” and in Kendrick Lamar through his movements as he sang, most notably the way he twitched his hands to the speed of his verse from “Alright.” All of the song choices were great as they all recalled the history and influence of hip hop from both the old and new generation. My only issue with the entire performance is that Kendrick Lamar didn’t perform more. Lamar only performed the intro to “m.A.A.d city” and “Alright” from the albums “good kid, m.A.A.d city” and “To Pimp a Butterfly” respectively. These two albums are arguably the best in his discography, always swapping the number one and number two spots in most peoples’ rankings, so it makes sense for those songs to have been there. However, he completely left out his most recent album, 2017’s “DAMN,” which received both critical and commercial success. Kendrick also has a history of performing unreleased music or music for future releases, like during his performance at the 58th Grammy Awards where he performed “Untitled 05” a month before “Untitled Unmastered” was even released, but nothing of the like was done either. Although the show was clearly more geared towards “old heads,” as both Dr. Dre and Snoop Dogg dominated the show, it would have been amazing to see Kendrick Lamar take the reins for longer, demonstrating a passing of the torch moment, rather than just coexisting with Eminem, Dr. Dre, and Snoop Dogg continuing to rap soon after.

Regardless of my slight critique of the limited performance from Kendrick Lamar, I still believe that everything about the 2022 Super Bowl Halftime Show blended together to make the perfect tribute to the history of hip hop and the city of Compton. For it being the first time hip hop took center stage at the Super Bowl, it made a great first impression and will definitely be in the conversation as one of the greatest halftime shows of all time.

Grade: A


Artists: Dr. Dre, Snoop Dogg, Eminem, Mary J. Blige, Kendrick Lamar, 50 Cent, Anderson .Paak
Director: Hamish Hamilton

Image courtesy of CBS Sports.

Super Bowl 2022 halftime show review: Dr. Dre, Snoop Dogg ...

14-02-2022 · Super Bowl halftime show review: Dr. Dre, Snoop Dogg, Kendrick Lamar had a show-stopping homecoming. Share this article share ... This was a show designed for television, and it told an incredibly ...

14-02-2022

For a Super Bowl halftime performance in Los Angeles, it was only fitting for Dr. Dre and Snoop Dogg, and Kendrick Lamar to dominate the stage.

This was a show designed for television, and it told an incredibly compelling story for those who were tuning in.

With this performance, Dr. Dre flexed his influence on not only the city of Los Angeles but also on music as a whole. He played an instrumental role in bringing many of these artists into our life, helping to not only discover their talent but to popularize them as well.

It was such a nice reminder that after all these years, Andre Young is Still D.R.E. and we never should have forgotten about Dre. It’s Dre’s world and we are just living in it.

Richard Mackson-USA TODAY Sports

Snoop Dogg and Dr. Dre and Kendrick Lamar could not have felt more comfortable performing in Southern California. It was their love letter to their city and watching them show off their genius in a literal house made it feel even more authentic. Everything from the Dickies outfits to the cars, this was a beautiful hat tip to South Los Angeles.

Mark J. Rebilas-USA TODAY Sports

With the lineup we had for this show, no one was surprised to see the legendary 50 Cent and Anderson .Paak both join on the bill. 50 Cent was a particularly logical choice as a special guest. For those paying attention, it was a brilliant nod to the “In Da Club” music video (which has over a billion views on YouTube!) to have the Grammy-winner begin his feature upside down.

Paak, meanwhile, earned his recognition as the modern incarnation of this lineage. I’m glad the rapper got his shine to play drums for the group because he is keeping their legacy alive. He added a really wonderful touch with the live instrumentation.

(AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

I’ll be honest. I was already having an incredibly good time watching the Super Bowl performance. But when Kendrick Lamar (who looked dope as heck) started rapping his bars on “M.A.A.D. City”, I can say I got full-body goosebumps. We have waited a long time between now and the last time we saw K-Dot on such a prominent stage. We know he is reclusive, but as we wait for his next drop, this gig just made me even more excited.

Mark J. Rebilas-USA TODAY Sports

When it was all said and done, Mary J. Blige (rocking some excellent boots) was one of the best parts of this Super Bowl halftime show. She was out there belting her heart and out and she gave her heart and soul to the music — so much so, in fact, that she even threw herself to the ground and dropped to the floor to end her time on the stage. 10/10.

People also ask
  • Who were the last 10 Super Bowl halftime performers?

    Rams, Halftime Show Dr. Dre is the halftime show performer for Super Bowl LVI—and will be joined at the SoFi Stadium in Los Angeles by Snoop Dogg, Eminem, Mary J Blige and Kendrick Lamar. At any other time, getting that many legendary artists on one stage would cost a fair amount, but not for the NFL.
    Yes, the Halftime Performers at the Super Bowl Do Get Paid—But No…
  • How long is halftime at the Super Bowl?

    The Super Bowl halftime can last anywhere from 20 to 30 minutes, depending on how much time the NFL allots to ready the field for the second half. Halftime is extended because of the Super Bowl halftime show. The show usually lasts between 12 and 14 minutes, but it takes time to both set up and strike the stage.

    There really isn't a good time to step away from the Super Bowl, not if you like commercials and The Weeknd in addition to the NFL action during the game itself. But halftime at least provides some opportunity.

    MORE: Watch the full Super Bowl 55 halftime show here

    That's because during the Super Bowl, halftime can extend to nearly twice as long as during the regular season. That gives you additional time for bathroom breaks, eating, or hopping on a Zoom call with the folks you'd normally be partying with if not for COVID-19.

    It's never exactly announced ahead of time how long halftime is, but historically, it's fallen into a certain window. Plan out your halftime break with the additional time worked in.

    MORE SUPER BOWL: Halftime show | Ticket prices | Commercials

    How long is halftime at the Super Bowl?

    Halftime at the Super Bowl can range anywhere from 20 to 30 minutes depending on the exact minute-by-minute breakdown the NFL decides upon each year.

    Additional time is needed thanks to the Super Bowl halftime show, which includes a musical act that lasts 12-to-14 minutes along with setup time. When you add up teams leaving the field and returning to it before and after the show's setup and teardown, the Super Bowl's halftime approaches half an hour. 

    How long is a regular NFL halftime?

    A regular NFL halftime lasts between 12 and 15 minutes. There's no halftime show to account for, so the break serves as a chance for teams to recharge and discuss strategy adjustments while fans buy concessions or use the restroom.

    Because of the difference in break time, teams occasionally practice for the longer halftime break at the Super Bowl. In 2012, that's what the Patriots did — coach Bill Belichick made his team go to the locker for 30 minutes in the middle of a practice.

    “It really gets into a whole restarting mentality,” Belichick told NJ.com then. “It’s not like taking a break and coming out in the second half. It’s like starting the game all over again. It’s like playing a game, stopping, and then playing a second game.”

    New England didn't win after that practice, though, falling to the Giants, 21-17. But the Patriots did score first after the break, less than four minutes into the half on a TD pass from Tom Brady to Aaron Hernandez, so maybe the practice helped.

    What time is the Super Bowl halftime show?

    The Super Bowl's halftime itself should come around 8 p.m. ET. The game kicks off at 6:30 p.m., and NFL first halves take approximately 90 minutes.

    That means those hoping to watch The Weeknd perform at Super Bowl 55 should have their televisions locked on to CBS by 8 p.m. ET for a performance that's expected to take 13 minutes, according to Entertainment Tonight. 

    Super Bowl 2022 halftime show: TV, live stream, who’s ...
  • Who is doing the Super Bowl halftime?

    The entertainers that year were Shakira and Jennifer Lopez with guests Bad Bunny and J Balvin. In September 2021, the NFL announced that the halftime entertainers for Super Bowl LVI would be Dr. Dre, Snoop Dogg, Eminem, Mary J. Blige and Kendrick Lamar.
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  • When is halftime show?

    When the NFL hosts Super Bowl LVI in the Los Angeles area in February of 2022, it'll do so with one of its biggest halftime shows to date, at least in terms of combined star power on the stage.
    Halftime show
Super Bowl Halftime Shows Ranked: Rob Sheffield's …

04-02-2021 · Super Bowl Halftime Shows Ranked: From Worst to Best Pop spectacles, Janet’s nipple, Springsteen’s marathon, Left Shark and loads of soul revues – we’ve seen ’em all

04-02-2021

Home Culture Culture Lists

There is no gig in music like the Super Bowl halftime show. You have 15 minutes to justify your legend. You have 150 million people watching, most of whom are distracted by the nachos platter, how much beer is left in the fridge or how much of the rent they bet on the Bucs. Chances are it’s the biggest worldwide audience of your life, and getting it right means rising to the hugeness of the moment. Getting it wrong can crush a career. Good luck to the Weeknd.

And with Super Bowl 55 set for this Sunday, what better time to rank the Big Game’s halftime shows from worst to best. Here’s a subjective, personal, irresponsible and indefensible breakdown of the winners and losers. The Bonos and Beyoncés and Bruces and Britneys. The Janets and Justins. From Prince and Madonna, from Michael to Macca. Plus the year they trapped poor Gloria Estefan in a Minnesota “Winter Magic” pageant with a bunch of figure skaters and inflatable snowmen. Believe it or not, all these Super Bowl halftime shows really happened. Some were transcendent. Some sucked. Pass those bacon fritters and enjoy the show.

2022 Super Bowl Halftime Show: Best and Worst …

Best: A loving homage to Los Angeles and the West Coast. It’s been 29 years since the Los Angeles area has hosted the Super Bowl, so when it came to the halftime show, the performances felt like ...

Hip hop finally had its moment at the Super Bowl Sunday night when legends Dr. Dre, Snoop Dogg, Kendrick Lamar, Mary J. Blige, and Eminem took to the stage for an electrifying halftime show at the So-Fi Stadium in Inglewood, Calif. The spectacular, high-energy performance was a powerful celebration of hip hop and its evolution over the last three decades, centering on the legacy of Dr. Dre, a pioneer of West Coast rap whose outsize influence on the genre helped shape the careers of his co-headliners, especially his protege, Eminem, and fellow hometown heroes, Snoop Dogg and Kendrick Lamar. It was also a fitting nod to the host city of Inglewood and the Los Angeles area.

The performance marked the first time the halftime show lineup consisted entirely of hip hop headliners—a move that some saw as the NFL’s bid to connect with fans and artists alike after many felt alienated by the league’s stance on Colin Kaepernick’s national anthem demonstration against police brutality and racial injustice, as well as growing tensions around race in the league.

Here are the best and worst moments of the 2022 halftime show.

Best: A loving homage to Los Angeles and the West Coast

It’s been 29 years since the Los Angeles area has hosted the Super Bowl, so when it came to the halftime show, the performances felt like a love letter to the city. From the set, which featured nods to Los Angeles area landmarks like the legendary music venue Eve After Dark and Compton burger joint Tam’s Burgers #21, to the choreography, which involved Snoop Dogg, clad in Rams blue and gold, doing his signature crip walk, the show was an outpouring of West Coast pride—none more evident than when Dre and Snoop took to the stage to perform “California Love.” Of course, the most cogent show of love for the city of Angels was in the talent lineup; tapping Dr. Dre, the godfather of West Coast rap, and hometown heroes like Snoop Dogg, Kendrick Lamar, and Anderson .Paak made for a show that was truly unforgettable.

Best: Surprise performances by 50 Cent and Anderson .Paak

As if having five titans of hip hop headlining the halftime show wasn’t already a wealth of talent, 50 Cent and Anderson .Paak made prominent surprise appearances during the show. 50 Cent performed a rousing rendition of his Dr. Dre-produced hit, “In Da Club,” even going so far as to roguishly recreate the music video for it by hanging upside down from the top of the set. Meanwhile, Anderson .Paak emanated pure joy as he played the drums during Eminem’s dynamic performance of “Lose Yourself.”

Best: The celebration of Dr. Dre and 3 decades of hip hop

Nostalgia was at an all-time high in the best way, thanks to the musical legacy of Dr. Dre. By building the show around Dre’s huge influence, it resulted in a rich display of how hip hop has grown and evolved over the last three decades, due in part to the rapper’s work in the industry as not only an artist and producer, but a collaborator and mentor. Indeed, Dre’s strong support of his co-headliners in many cases, helped build or even launch their careers; Snoop made his industry debut on Dre’s first solo album, while Eminem has long been considered his protege. Even Jay Z, whose Roc Nation co-produced the halftime show, in his early years as a rapper, worked closely with Dre—he’s credited with writing Dre’s verses for “Still D.R.E.”

Best: Eminem takes a knee

Kneeling has become symbolic of former NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick’s 2016 demonstration against police brutality and racial inequality, in which he kneeled during the national anthem, so it was a charged moment when Eminem knelt on stage after his performance of “Lose Yourself.” While Eminem did not explicitly state he was kneeling in solidarity with Kaepernick, the visual was powerful and sparked meaningful dialogue.

Worst: Kendrick Lamar’s missing lyric about police

Since it was released in 2015, Kendrick Lamar’s “Alright” has served as a rallying cry against police brutality, even becoming a protest song for the Black Lives Matter movement and the 2020 national reckoning with structural inequality. The song deals with racist violence and injustice, and its message explicitly calls out police brutality. While it’s unclear if Lamar’s lyric about police (“And we hate po-po”) was censored by the network or the rapper left it out, many found its noticeable absence egregious. Later in the show, Dr. Dre did perform the line “still not lovin’ police” from “Still D.R.E.”

Worst: The under-utilization of the immense talents of Mary J. Blige and Kendrick Lamar

With five headliners, there was never going to be enough time to showcase all the hits of every performer, but it’s a shame that for this show, it came at the expense of the talents of Mary J. Blige and Kendrick Lamar. While Blige performed her Dre-produced hit “No More Drama” and “Family Affair” phenomenally, it felt like just a taste of what could have been. Lamar had an even briefer stint, performing just a snippet of “m.A.A.d. city” and a version of his anthem, “Alright.”

Write to Cady Lang at [email protected]

Super Bowl halftime show reviews 2021 ... - NFL | NBA

Super Bowl halftime show reviews 2021: The best, worst reactions to The Weeknd. The Weeknd will be performing during the Super Bowl 55 halftime show, and it should be quite the performance. The ...

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The Weeknd will be performing during the Super Bowl 55 halftime show, and it should be quite the performance.

The Weeknd, whose real name is Abel Tesfaye, has had a cinematic roleout of his latest album, "After Hours." He's had a developing theme throughout his music videos for the album, each telling its own story. The Weeknd is known for his creative nature in presenting his music, in addition to his incredible vocals.

That's why the singer is putting up million of his own money into making this Super Bowl performance "be what he envisioned," per Billboard. 

MORE: Everything to know about The Weeknd's songs and more

"We've been really focusing on dialing in on the fans at home and making performances a cinematic experience, and we want to do that with the Super Bowl," he told Billboard.

Another element to the show is the fact The Weeknd will be performing solo. In the past, the Super Bowl halftime show has had one main performer, with a number of appearances from other artists. But The Weeknd didn't want to go away from his vision.

"I've been reading a lot of rumors," he told NFL Network leading up to the event. "There wasn't any room to fit it in the narrative and the story I was telling in the performance. So there's no special guests, no."

The Weeknd told Billboard he expect the performance to last around 12-13 minutes.

MORE: The best, worst Super Bowl halftime performances of all time

Watch the Super Bowl 2021 halftime show

Super Bowl halftime show reviews

HE SANG STARBOY AND I FEEL IT COMING IM CRYINGGGGGGG I MISS DAFT PUNK SO MUCHHHHHH

— nat⁷ (@lalunaknj) February 8, 2021

Im actually apart of the community that likes Starboy more than After Hours.

— Terrell Mallory (@_Twinndiesel) February 8, 2021

The marching red army is a little off putting but Abel looks like he’s having a blast, so I’m happy for the man.

— Josh Eberley🇨🇦 (@JoshEberley) February 8, 2021

HOUSE OF BALLOONS ABEL?!?! 🔥🔥🔥😤😤😤😤😤

— Ernest Arrellano III (@thethirdernest) February 8, 2021

I got carsick in there with The Weeknd

— Pat McAfee (@PatMcAfeeShow) February 8, 2021

The Weeknd a 🐐no cap

— XXL Magazine (@XXL) February 8, 2021

The Weeknd: I’ll keep it PG

Also The Weeknd: lemme sing the cocaine song

— The Big Chillin' (@Kofie) February 8, 2021

pic.twitter.com/ZP5DdFGScc

— theScore (@theScore) February 8, 2021

8:40 p.m.: And that's a wrap for the halftime show.

8:37 p.m.: And as we all expected, "Blinding Lights" make an appearance.

8:36 p.m.: We get our first song from the Triology era. The Weeknd played a rendition of "House of Balloons / Glass Table Girls." He also brought out a bunch of look-alikes on the field with him.

8:33 p.m.: Aother classic from The Weeknd, he started playing "Earned It" from the "Fifty Shades of Grey" movie. It's somewhat interesting that The Weeknd has only been playing a few moments of each song. He hasn't really dived too deep into any song in particular.

8:32 p.m.: And as soon as I say that, he plays "Save Your Tears" from "After Hours."

8:31 p.m.: A somewhat surprising addition, The Weeknd played "I Feel It Coming." So far he's played no tracks off of his newest album "After Hours."

8:30 p.m.: And of course, The Weeknd includes "Can't Feel My Face." 

8:28 p.m.: Second song of the night is "The Hills."

8:27 p.m.: The Weeknd begins his performance with "Starboy."

8:25 p.m.: The show has begun.

8:15 p.m.: We've now hit halftime, so The Weeknd will be performing soon. While you're here, here's why his name is spelled The Weeknd and not The Weekend .

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Super Bowl halftime show review: The Weeknd struggles with ...

08-02-2021 · The Weeknd was good. The Weeknd was fine. The singer’s halftime show at the Super Bowl was always going to be difficult this year. With limited fans in the stadium, a hesitance to bring in any ...

08-02-2021

The Weeknd was good. The Weeknd was fine. 

The singer’s halftime show at the Super Bowl was always going to be difficult this year. With limited fans in the stadium, a hesitance to bring in any guest performers (which resulted in Abel Tesfaye singing alone), and a need to keep things mostly toned down, it was always going to be hard to make the show feel special.

Things were always going to be difficult, and then they got even worse — the sound mix on the first song was so bad that many fans at home were left turning up the volume or wondering what was even happening.

They eventually ironed out the mix, but then The Weeknd made another misstep — trying to create a more dynamic atmosphere by going inside a set that was supposed to create a funhouse effect. It ended up being disorienting (and kind of nauseating), and had more than a few fans comparing his camera work to that of The Joker in The Dark Knight.

pic.twitter.com/7oI0gDErWr

— Joey (@JoeyMulinaro) February 8, 2021

That combined with the attempt to create some hysteria with the masked background dancers (were they robots? half-bandaged mummies?) led to moments that felt more disorienting than inspiring or cool. It was just sort of weird.

It was one of those times where he was best served by just playing his songs — and this performance did remind me that The Weeknd has an awful lot of good songs.

And that all led to the final cut, and The Weeknd’s one true shining moment of the halftime show. He ran down to the field and with all his half mummies, started running and dancing to his new hit, “Blinding Lights.”

Gone was the hysteria. Gone was The Joker vibe. It was sweet release — a great song playing and a bunch of people all running around at a concert, dancing their faces off. It’s what we all want. It was, for that moment, perfect.

Super Bowl 55 halftime show review: The Weeknd goes …

The response to the Weeknd's halftime show was very much mixed, at least according to the tweet machine: Idc @theweeknd killed that y’all need to stop hating... — Blake Snell (@snellzilla4 ...

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Maybe the Weeknd needed another day or two to put it all together.

The artist, who's largely known for his dark R&B style, is a multiple-time Grammy Award winner, so it seemed like a slam dunk, a no-brainer, a home run when he was announced for the Super Bowl 55 halftime show late in 2020.

MORE: Best, worst reactions to Weeknd's performance | Watch the show

For the most part, the show was unique and high-energy, but it wasn't received as well as it probably should have been, especially when one considers the Weeknd (real name Abel Tesfaye) put up million of his own money to make the show as he envisioned it.

Part of that vision was a stage in the stands, seizure-inducing light displays and a gaudy fireworks display at the end. 

Interestingly, the Weeknd's performance was entirely solo, the first time that has happened in quite a bit: While he had an entire orchestra and a field's worth of dancers with him, there were no guest appearances, though several names were rumored for a spot next to him. 

pic.twitter.com/sCCADYeCBE

— Skeeter (@Skeeter696969) February 8, 2021

Not surprisngly, not everyone was in love with the performance. The response to the Weeknd's halftime show was very much mixed, at least according to the tweet machine:

Production was great. Performance? Not so much.

— REGGIEOnTheMOVE™ (@ReginaldLBarnes) February 8, 2021

I love The Weeknd. I really do.

But this is definitely a very sub par halftime show. Especially compared to other years. It’s too bad. I honestly thought it would be better.

— John R Nabors 🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸 (@BuzzJohnNabors) February 8, 2021

The audio for The Weeknd wasn’t great but let’s be fair. It wasn’t Black Eyed Peas bad.

— Moons are a thing! (@Lesley_NOPE) February 8, 2021

Apparently a hot take, but I liked THE Weeknd's halftime show.

— Jerry Blevins (@jerryblevins) February 8, 2021

The Weeknd’s good but it’s been a long year, this should’ve been some elaborate medley with Beyoncé, Elton John, Willie Nelson, hologram Elvis, maybe that lady who balances plates on a unicycle, Kobayashi wolfing down hot dogs, I’m just saying we deserve a ridiculous nice thing.

— Ben Collins (@oneunderscore__) February 8, 2021

I loved that production and performance. @theweeknd has such great songs. Wish the NFL cared enough to do a better audio mix for it. #SuperBowl

— Eric Monacelli (@ermonacelli) February 8, 2021

That was masterful, @theweeknd. From concept to execution including multiple set designs (how big was that stage in the stands??), symbolism, art & costume design, command of the stage to the closing shot backlit by exploding fireworks, tremendous halftime show. #PepsiHalftime

— Cabbie Richards (@Cabbie) February 8, 2021

Best @NFL Halftime Show I’ve ever seen. @theweeknd absolutely blew it away. No surprise there. Super impressive set and choreography. Can’t imagine amount of planning that went into that show, but it was worth it. It was a true cinematic experience.

Well done Abel👏🏻 #SuperBowl pic.twitter.com/Cf7qG0hnwf

— Luke Farwell (@LukeFarwell) February 8, 2021

The Weeknd was fine and entertaining and I’ll also forget it happened by 1pm tomorrow.

It can be both.

— Mikey (@fsmikey) February 8, 2021

The Weeknd was awesome and even more awesome is seeing how weirded out everyone was by it. #SuperBowl

— Greg Wyshynski (@wyshynski) February 8, 2021

The Weeknd had to do a show for a half-empty stadium, with songs about drugs of which some were ballad-y, and it was memorable and creative and had some good visual images, and while I am not a huge fan of his the songs are not bad! It was a good effort, and good for him

— Bruce Arthur (@bruce_arthur) February 8, 2021

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NFL Used Super Bowl Halftime Show to Hate America—Show it ...

15-02-2022 · NFL Used Super Bowl Halftime Show to Hate America—Show it is MORE Racist Than KKK February 14, 2022 By Stephen Frank 16 Comments If you watched the NFL approved Super Bowl half time show you would have thought America would be entertained by an anti-American singer taking a knee to dismiss and demean our cops and military.

15-02-2022

February 14, 2022 By Stephen Frank

If you watched the NFL approved Super Bowl half time show you would have thought America would be entertained by an anti-American singer taking a knee to dismiss and demean our cops and military.  Then you had singers known for their anti-police, hate white people, pro drug songs—in Hip Hop fashion.  Seriously how many Americans prefer Hip Hop to Country Western, rock and roll or patriotic songs.  The NFL, the voice and apologists for the genocide/slave nation of China, used the half time show as a propaganda tool against the values of the fans of the NFL and Americans.

“**  Snoop Dogg announced in 2013 that he’s love to show his kids how to smoke pot.

** Snoop Dogg called Mitt Romney a “white n***er” in 2012.

** Snoop Dogg on Imus in 2007, “Rappers’ hos are different.”

** Snoop Dogg outside the Trump White House with a blunt, “F**k Trump.”

** Snoop Dogg calls President Trump a n***er, says “F**k him” on government shutdown.

** Snoop Dogg calls black conservatives “the coon bunch” in 2020.”

This is who the NFL allowed to promote his values to our nation.  The NFL is lead by haters and the half time show is more proof the Chinese have great influence in this once American game.

Super Bowl Sewer: Halftime Show Features Snoop Dogg – Who Fired Gun at Trump’s Head in Video, Called Black Conservatives “Coon Bunch,” Promoted Pot His Entire Career

By Jim Hoft, Gateway Pundit,  2/13/22 

Rapper, Snoop Dogg produced a rap video ‘BadBadNotGood’ back in 2017.

He depicts President Trump as a clown smoking a joint and ends up pointing a gun at his head.  When he shoots the gun, a flash fires at Trump’s head and a ‘BANG’ flag pops out.

Snoop Dogg has rapped about drugs and sexually abusing women for decades yet he depicts President Trump as a pot-smoking clown.

FYI, Donald Trump doesn’t even drink alcohol…

Imagine if an ‘entertainer’ made a video like this about Obama?  The outcry would be heard around the world and the Secret Service would have investigated.  This is in line with how degenerate Hollywood has become as they push an immoral agenda.

VIDEO: Not only is there a language warning for this video, you will also lose brain cells after listening to such vapid ‘lyrics’.

**  Snoop Dogg announced in 2013 that he’s love to show his kids how to smoke pot.

** Snoop Dogg called Mitt Romney a “white n***er” in 2012.

** Snoop Dogg on Imus in 2007, “Rappers’ hos are different.”

** Snoop Dogg outside the Trump White House with a blunt, “F**k Trump.”

** Snoop Dogg calls President Trump a n***er, says “F**k him” on government shutdown.

** Snoop Dogg calls black conservatives “the coon bunch” in 2020.

Tonight Snoop Dogg is singing at the Super Bowl halftime show — Expect a lot of cop bashing.

REVIEW: The Weeknd bores at Super Bowl halftime show …

08-02-2021 · REVIEW: The Weeknd bores at Super Bowl halftime show. His name is The Weeknd but his Super Bowl performance felt like a dreary Monday morning. Don't miss the big stories. Like us on Facebook. NEW...

08-02-2021

NEW YORK — His name is The Weeknd but his Super Bowl performance felt like a dreary Monday morning.

The pop star headlined the Super Bowl halftime show, running through his many hits like an Olympic relay track team aiming for the gold. But he wasn’t victorious Sunday night — no silver or bronze medals will be handed out here.

The Weeknd kicked off his 14-minute set in his signature red blazer and sunglasses, directing his robotic ensemble and singing “Call Out My Name.” His nasally, semi-Michael Jackson-esque vocals shined — especially during “The Hills” and “Earned It” — but the performance felt like it was designed for a typical awards show in the vein of the Billboard Awards or MTV VMAs — not the Super Bowl stage.

Maybe he had restrictions — either creatively, or COVID-ly? Who knows, but overall his performance felt limited and inadequate. Special guests should have been a non-negotiable.

The Weeknd finally came to life — 10 minutes to the performance — when he and dozens of his dancers hit the field to perform the explosive hit “Blinding Lights,” giving off flash mob vibes.

He was finally center stage, where he needed to be all night. But it was too late to save the show —most of the singing was done on the sidelines, as if it was an afterthought. Maybe because it was.

Who did impress the world at the Super Bowl? Jazmine Sullivan and Eric Church.

The odd couple proved why they are multiple Grammy-nominated stars in their own right, blending their vocals beautifully to create a memorable, enjoyable rendition of “The Star Spangled Banner” on Sunday.

Church kicked off the performance, strumming his guitar and giving all the feels with his raspy vocals. Sullivan later joined in, her voice also raspy but heavy and rich, belting the lyrics like a veteran singer. They both gained new fans Sunday night.

They finished the song singing together — Church letting Sullivan stand front and center with her beaming vocals and him right behind her, melding in epically like a perfect teammate.

Before that performance, Grammy-winning guitar slayer H.E.R. proved her rock star status with her rendition of “America the Beautiful.” Her vocals were soft and strong, as she strummed her guitar like a true star.

Sullivan, Church and H.E.R. performed in Tampa at the Raymond James Stadium before Tampa Bay Buccaneers took on the Kansas City Chiefs.

The Weeknd’s Super Bowl 2021 halftime show review: …

08-02-2021 · The Weeknd strikes a dramatic pose during his Super Bowl 2021 halftime performance in Tampa. Getty Images The show began with a Vegas-y neon set …

08-02-2021

It was all about the Latina divas — Jennifer Lopez and Shakira — last year, back when there was no such thing as social distancing happening between J.Lo and J Balvin.

But the Super Bowl 2021 halftime show was all about pop’s great man of mystery: The Weeknd.

After a year in which he bloodied and then completely bandaged his face, and then appeared to have plastic surgery — all for the sake of his art — The Weeknd was ready for his close-up on the biggest stage in the biz.

And with his old mug back, all that you could feel was his music — with a string of hits such as “Can’t Feel My Face,” “I Feel It Coming” and “Blinding Lights” that have anointed him as the heir to Prince and Michael Jackson in his era.

But it was also clear from his halftime show — for which The Weeknd poured in million of his own money — that the artist born Abel Tesfaye, still only 30, is not yet in the same league as a live performer as either the “Thriller” or “Purple Rain” legends, both of whom had more memorable moments on the Super Bowl stage.

The Weeknd's Halftime 2021 performance.
The Weeknd strikes a dramatic pose during his Super Bowl 2021 halftime performance in Tampa.Getty Images

The show began with a Vegas-y neon set that continued the concept of The Weeknd’s hit album, “After Hours.” Indeed, he wore a glittery version of the same red blazer that he’s been sporting as he has remained in character during the LP’s promotion.

Opening with his 2016 No. 1 hit “Starboy” in the stands, he was backed by a gospel-style choir, all appropriately socially distanced from each other.

But his next number, “The Hills,” felt too moody for the moment. And “Can’t Feel My Face,” for all of its cool visuals, felt more like a video.

Indeed, the whole thing was shot through a filter that never made it seem quite live.

But The Weekend finished strong with his last two numbers: “Earned It” — his Grammy-winning, Oscar-nominated hit from the “Fifty Shades of Grey” soundtrack — put the focus on him and his sensual allure with an orchestra backing him up and ratcheting up the drama.

And the finale, “Blinding Lights,” did not disappoint. First off, it really helped to have The Weeknd finally come from the stands to the field. At that point, you were reminded that, “Oh yeah, this is the Super Bowl,” because the rest of it could have been anywhere else. And with an army of dancers in full-face bandages, his performance art was elevated to something spectacular.

But he could have used a special guest or two, whether it was his “Love Me Harder” partner Ariana Grande or his “Blinding Lights” remix collaborator Rosalía. As we learned from J.Lo and Shakira last year, it takes a lot to own the Super Bowl halftime show all on your own.

Super Bowl 2020 Halftime Show Review: Shakira, J.Lo Dominate

03-02-2020 · super bowl 2020 Feb. 3, 2020. ... proceeded — to unite a divided NFL audience. In 54 years, the Super Bowl halftime show has never featured Latinx artists performing music in Spanish. (In ’99 ...

03-02-2020

It was a weird night, but it was a good halftime show. Photo: Kevin Winter/Getty Images

Super Bowl halftime performances can be, and often are, quite bad. In the early years of the show, you were lucky to get a marching band, a college drill team, a few incongruous movie stars, or some other wholesome business. Carol Channing played twice. The youth educational organization Up With People made four appearances between 1976 and 1986, the most of any single entity in the show’s history, and enough to catch slander from both The Simpsons and Family Guy. It wasn’t until the 25th ceremony in 1991 that a pop act — New Kids on the Block, it should be noted — touched the stage. Not long after, Michael Jackson’s 1993 appearance made the Super Bowl one of the most sought-after venues for mainstream performers. The NFL slowly leaned into modernity after that, though not without incident.

The show’s always either overextending or thinking too narrowly. On one end, there’s overly ambitious years like 1995, when Patti LaBelle and Tony Bennett duetted during routines from Disneyland’s Indiana Jones production for whatever reason; 2001, when ’N Sync, Nelly, Mary J. Blige, and Britney Spears all crammed into Aerosmith’s “Walk This Way”; and 2004, whose infamous mechanical failure featuring Justin Timberlake and Janet Jackson happened at the end of a mismatched medley of Diddy, Nelly, and Kid Rock songs. There’s also years like the back of the aughts, in which hip-hop and R&B were pushed out of the picture to showcase all of the veteran rock acts that should’ve gotten the gig in the ’70s and ’80s.

Lady Gaga and Beyoncé proved the show could be a set piece for style, professionalism, and politics in recent years, and then Maroon 5 and Justin Timberlake offered the rejoinder, that bros who leave their politics at the door will always have a seat at the NFL’s table. The league has since looked to change its course on matters of social justice, or at least its optics. A year ago, the NFL unveiled its Inspire Change initiative, a network of programs aimed at closing wealth disparities and improving relations between the police and their respective communities. Inspire Change came in hot, though, with co-partner Jay-Z creating a fuss by working with the NFL as Colin Kaepernick remained blackballed for protesting during the national anthem. Some saw the gesture as the crossing of a picket line. Others withheld judgment until they saw a bit of what Jay-Z’s music-industry acumen could do for the game.

At Super Bowl LIV last night, the precariousness of the NFL’s journey to wokeness took shape strangely. Inspire Change’s official spot showed former San Francisco 49ers wide receiver Anquan Boldin searching for answers after the fatal shooting of his cousin. A Trump 2020 ad used the pardon of Alice Marie Johnson to sell viewers on his (wobbly) record on criminal-justice reform; a Bloomberg ad highlighted the murder of football-loving 20-year-old George Kemp Jr. in 2013 and promised Mike would fight the gun lobby. While political factions lunged for slices of the Super Bowl’s hefty viewership, Shakira and Jennifer Lopez tried — and, at least for the duration of their 15-minute segment, proceeded — to unite a divided NFL audience.

In 54 years, the Super Bowl halftime show has never featured Latinx artists performing music in Spanish. (In ’99, as Latin-pop music impacted the American charts, Gloria Estefan did “Oye” in English, and in 2000, Christina Aguilera and Enrique Iglesias were brought out to sing Disney’s Epcot Millennium theme song “Celebrate the Future Hand in Hand,” because why not? Bruno Mars played pop and rock songs in English both times he appeared.) History was made two minutes in, when Shakira’s set of hits broke out a bit of the old ¿Dónde Están los Ladrones? closer, “Ojos Así,” a song in which the native Colombian also highlights her Lebanese roots. In six minutes, Shakira proved her skill as a singer, dancer, guitar player, and drummer (on her birthday, no less), while striking a careful balance between her dueling rockera and pop-star personas through the years and pointing to the future by bringing Bad Bunny out for “I Like It.” (J Balvin dropped by later on. We deserved the two at once.)

Jennifer Lopez dug into her trove of hip-hop/R&B jams and delivered the kind of timeless choreography that keeps her booked for televised performances, whether the new singles are popping or not. She repped New York City hip-hop, revisiting “Jenny From the Block” and the Murder Inc. remix for “Ain’t It Funny,” then turned the stage into a nightclub for “Waiting for Tonight.” She pushed further with dance than Shakira did, at the cost of a good grip of singing. Her intricate routines nodded to the Super Bowl’s marching-band past, and suggested that someone’s paying attention to the fearlessly vertical routines in Cheer and large-scale productions like Homecoming. The two balanced each other out; what Shakira gave you in versatile musicality, J.Lo gave you in acrobatics, fleet footwork, and hip-hop bluster.

J-Lo’s daughter, Emme Muñiz, delivered the night’s most direct political punch. She sang a piece of “Let’s Get Loud” inside a round metal structure resembling a cage and later belted out the chorus to Bruce Springsteen’s “Born in the USA” as her mom waved a double-sided cape emblazoned with Puerto Rican and United States flags. The message — that Puerto Rico’s struggles are our struggles, and that what happens to the people locked away at the border will define us for generations to come — was loud. A stage full of bright, gifted women, men, and children of color was a more emboldening sight than anything PR teams trying to buy their attention could muster. It was a weird night, but it was a good halftime show.

For 15 Minutes, Shakira and Jennifer Lopez United the Masses

Super Bowl halftime show reviews 2021: The best, worst ...

The Weeknd will be performing during the Super Bowl 55 halftime show, and it should be quite the performance. The Weeknd, whose real name is Abel Tesfaye, has had a cinematic roleout of his latest ...

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The Weeknd will be performing during the Super Bowl 55 halftime show, and it should be quite the performance.

The Weeknd, whose real name is Abel Tesfaye, has had a cinematic roleout of his latest album, "After Hours." He's had a developing theme throughout his music videos for the album, each telling its own story. The Weeknd is known for his creative nature in presenting his music, in addition to his incredible vocals.

That's why the singer is putting up million of his own money into making this Super Bowl performance "be what he envisioned," per Billboard. 

MORE: Everything to know about The Weeknd's songs and more

"We've been really focusing on dialing in on the fans at home and making performances a cinematic experience, and we want to do that with the Super Bowl," he told Billboard.

Another element to the show is the fact The Weeknd will be performing solo. In the past, the Super Bowl halftime show has had one main performer, with a number of appearances from other artists. But The Weeknd didn't want to go away from his vision.

"I've been reading a lot of rumors," he told NFL Network leading up to the event. "There wasn't any room to fit it in the narrative and the story I was telling in the performance. So there's no special guests, no."

The Weeknd told Billboard he expect the performance to last around 12-13 minutes.

MORE: The best, worst Super Bowl halftime performances of all time

Watch the Super Bowl 2021 halftime show

Super Bowl halftime show reviews

HE SANG STARBOY AND I FEEL IT COMING IM CRYINGGGGGGG I MISS DAFT PUNK SO MUCHHHHHH

— nat⁷ (@lalunaknj) February 8, 2021

Im actually apart of the community that likes Starboy more than After Hours.

— Terrell Mallory (@_Twinndiesel) February 8, 2021

The marching red army is a little off putting but Abel looks like he’s having a blast, so I’m happy for the man.

— Josh Eberley🇨🇦 (@JoshEberley) February 8, 2021

HOUSE OF BALLOONS ABEL?!?! 🔥🔥🔥😤😤😤😤😤

— Ernest Arrellano III (@thethirdernest) February 8, 2021

I got carsick in there with The Weeknd

— Pat McAfee (@PatMcAfeeShow) February 8, 2021

The Weeknd a 🐐no cap

— XXL Magazine (@XXL) February 8, 2021

The Weeknd: I’ll keep it PG

Also The Weeknd: lemme sing the cocaine song

— The Big Chillin' (@Kofie) February 8, 2021

pic.twitter.com/ZP5DdFGScc

— theScore (@theScore) February 8, 2021

8:40 p.m.: And that's a wrap for the halftime show.

8:37 p.m.: And as we all expected, "Blinding Lights" make an appearance.

8:36 p.m.: We get our first song from the Triology era. The Weeknd played a rendition of "House of Balloons / Glass Table Girls." He also brought out a bunch of look-alikes on the field with him.

8:33 p.m.: Aother classic from The Weeknd, he started playing "Earned It" from the "Fifty Shades of Grey" movie. It's somewhat interesting that The Weeknd has only been playing a few moments of each song. He hasn't really dived too deep into any song in particular.

8:32 p.m.: And as soon as I say that, he plays "Save Your Tears" from "After Hours."

8:31 p.m.: A somewhat surprising addition, The Weeknd played "I Feel It Coming." So far he's played no tracks off of his newest album "After Hours."

8:30 p.m.: And of course, The Weeknd includes "Can't Feel My Face." 

8:28 p.m.: Second song of the night is "The Hills."

8:27 p.m.: The Weeknd begins his performance with "Starboy."

8:25 p.m.: The show has begun.

8:15 p.m.: We've now hit halftime, so The Weeknd will be performing soon. While you're here, here's why his name is spelled The Weeknd and not The Weekend .

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Super Bowl Halftime Shows, Ranked From Worst To Best ...

15-11-2018 · U2 — Super Bowl XXXVI (2002) Halftime simply never got better than this. For the first Super Bowl halftime performance after 9/11, U2 was chosen and it turned out to be a perfect call.

15-11-2018

The evolution of the Super Bowl halftime show would truly stun most people.

For about the first 25 years the big game was played, the halftime performance was a silly, inconsequential show typically performed by marching bands and dance groups with cheesy themes like “A Salute to the Big Band Era.” Then, in the early 1990s, the shows became something that some fans looked forward to more than the football game itself.

But not all Super Bowl halftime shows have been created equally. We’ve ranked the 30 most recent performances from worst to best. Take a look to find out where your favorite halftime show stands among the rest.

Winter Magic — Super Bowl XXVI (1992)

This painfully ’90s show features the most lackluster singing and dancing of any Super Bowl in the past 30 years. It’s all so cheesy and the costumes look like something a high school show choir would wear. The rap song inspired by Frosty the Snowman, called “Frosty,” may be the low point in halftime history.

The show eventually becomes a tribute to the 1992 Winter Olympics, featuring Dorothy Hamill and Brian Boitano figure skating on giant ice-covered snowflakes, as well as a pointless cameo appearance from members of the 1980 U.S. Olympic hockey team. The show closes with a lip-synched performance by Gloria Estefan — you know, a singer who is most identified with the winter wonderland that is Miami.

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New Kids On The Block — Super Bowl XXV (1991)

There’s almost too much to explain with this wacky performance. Sponsored by Walt Disney World, this halftime extravaganza was billed as the first “all-kids Super Bowl halftime show.” It starts uncomfortably with a chorus of little girls in cheerleading outfits and Minnie Mouse singing, “You’ve gotta be a football hero to get along with the beautiful girls.” Not exactly advancing gender equality.

At some point, the show switches to a tribute to the troops when a blond-haired angel of a boy in a little football uniform takes center stage to sing “Wind Beneath My Wings” while footage of American soldiers in the Gulf War is shown. Oh, and did I mention President George H.W. Bush and first lady Barbara Bush also make a videotaped appearance? Eventually, New Kids On the Block close out this manic halftime show with a couple of their hits.

The Black Eyed Peas — Super Bowl XLV (2011)

The Super Bowl’s return to current artists after years of classic rockers was, unfortunately, a terrible show. The Black Eyed Peas sounded dreadful from start to finish and Fergie’s take on “Sweet Child O’ Mine” with Slash on guitar made you wish someone had called Axl Rose.

Usher’s dance moves during his guest spot stole the show and make you wonder why he’s never done the show on his own. The best part of this entire lame performance were the green, light-up outfits worn by the people dancing around the stage.

Patti Labelle & Tony Bennett — Super Bowl XXIX (1995)

Where to start with this one? Disney took over producing duties for 1995 and turned the halftime show into an advertisement for its new Indiana Jones attraction at Disneyland. The show is a tribute to the iconic character and even featured a mini “plot” where cheesy versions of Indy and Marion Ravenwood have to steal the Vince Lombardi Trophy.

Along the way, Patti Labelle and Tony Bennett perform, leading to a closing sing-along number of “Can You Feel the Love Tonight” from Disney’s “The Lion King.” The whole thing is a terribly cheesy hype-machine for Disney. The only reason it’s not lower is because Labelle slays it with her vocals at the end — even if they were pre-recorded.

Justin Timberlake — Super Bowl LII (2018)

The third time Justin Timberlake has been involved in a Super Bowl halftime show was also the weakest by far. Following Lady Gaga is no enviable task, and this low-energy set didn’t live up to the challenge.

He played the hits and did a good job getting the crowd involved but it all just felt underwhelming and like Timberlake was trying way too hard. His inclusion of footage from Prince’s legendary halftime performance drew mixed reviews, especially in The Purple One’s home state of Minnesota.

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Salute To New Orleans And ‘Peanuts’ — Super Bowl XXIV (1990)

This bizarre mashup of themes simultaneously honored both New Orleans and the 40th anniversary of Charlie Brown. An animated Woodstock randomly appears several times dancing over the live action, which mostly consists of a chorus of people singing and dancing to traditional NOLA tunes.

“Mr. New Orleans” Pete Fountain closes things down by playing “When the Saints Go Marching In” on clarinet while standing atop a massive riverboat that spans about 35 yards. All the while, terrifying “Peanuts” character costumes dance around the field.

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Madonna — Super Bowl XLVI (2012)

Madonna’s long-overdue halftime performance proved that she could handle that stage alone — even though some lame guests were called in to help. Sure, her dance moves looked a little slow and she was obviously lip-synching, but the hits were still awesome and the performance was visually impressive.

Guest spots from M.I.A. and Nicki Minaj gave it an air of women’s empowerment, but seeing LMFAO and Cee Lo Green sharing in Madonna’s big moment is just laughable today. Her performance of “Like a Prayer,” backed by a stadium full of cell phone lights, was a strong finale.

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Disney Millennium Celebration — Super Bowl XXXIV (2000)

Disney once again used ABC’s Super Bowl year to promote its intellectual property and theme parks. This time, performers included Phil Collins, Christina Aguilera, Toni Braxton and Enrique Iglesias, making for a better show than their other halftime ads.

This show features many references to the new millennium, reminding anyone who was around back then how much time and energy we spent thinking about that before 9/11. The vocal performances here are all very strong even though the singers don’t do any dancing themselves. This one was all very serious and inspirational.

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Motown Salute — Super Bowl XXXII (1998)

Arguably the greatest collection of musical icons to ever appear in a single Super Bowl halftime show happened with 1998’s Motown 40th anniversary celebration. The Temptations, Smokey Robinson, Queen Latifah, Boyz II Men and Martha Reeves each got time to do some Motown hits.

The production values were very basic and the fact that the game was played on the West Coast meant the performance was held in broad daylight, which always takes away from the mood. Sadly, Motown aside, there just isn’t much that was truly memorable about this one.

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Diana Ross — Super Bowl XXX (1996)

For the Super Bowl’s 30th anniversary, the halftime show was given to someone who hadn’t had a Top 10 hit in 12 years. With that said, Diana Ross is a legendary performer for a reason and the medley of hits she did would make any Motown fan crank up the TV.

Ross looked great, seemed to be having a good time and ripped through 10 stone-cold classics while also making a few wardrobe changes. But the best part of the performance comes at the end, when a helicopter swoops in, lands at midfield and Ross jumps in and flies out of the stadium to end her performance!

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The Blues Brothers — Super Bowl XXXI (1997)

If The Blues Brothers had done halftime at the Super Bowl in 1980, it could have probably topped this list, but the “Blues Brothers 2000” lineup just didn’t have the same might. Dan Aykroyd and John Goodman don’t do much but Jim Belushi gave it his best, even if he had no clue how to sell lip-synching.

Paul Schaffer, James Brown and ZZ Top eventually join the performance, which culminates with everyone singing “Gimme Some Lovin'” while scantily clad women dance and bikers cruise around the stage on Harleys! The whole thing probably would’ve been better if they’d just let ZZ Top rip it up for 12 minutes.

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Stevie Wonder & Gloria Estefan — Super Bowl XXXIII (1999)

Tons of energy in this one. This show was billed as a celebration of soul, salsa and swing, which are three styles of music way too rich and distinctive to jam into one 12-minute medley. Big Bad Voodoo Daddy (remember them?) opened the show while a ton of couples did some swing dancing on the field, which was admittedly pretty cool.

From there, Stevie Wonder ripped through some of his greatest hits, making you wonder why he didn’t just do the show himself. Finally, Gloria Estefan kept the energy high and did a few of her songs before teaming with Stevie. I give this one extra credit for all the singers clearly performing their vocals live, which was virtually unheard of at the Super Bowl at this point.

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No Doubt & Shania Twain — Super Bowl XXXVII (2003)

Another bizarre lineup of performers, this one also including Sting, gets knocked down for Shania Twain’s entire performance sounding pre-recorded, including the band. She only did two songs before No Doubt took over and Gwen Stefani proved why she has so many fans.

No Doubt immediately took the energy way up and they sounded great, performing while goth cheerleaders bounced around on stage with black pom poms. Finally, Sting joined them for The Police’s classic “Message in a Bottle” and most people had completely forgotten that Shania was part of the show at all.

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Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers — Super Bowl XLII (2008)

One of the more understated halftime shows of recent history, Tom Petty’s 2008 performance pleased the crowd with four hits everyone knew by heart. Petty’s low-energy performing style was a stark contrast to Prince and The Rolling Stones, who had preceded him, but he and the Heartbreakers sounded great. If you wanted a halftime show you could sing along with while drinking your beer, this one was a dream.

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Chubby Checker — Super Bowl XXII (1988)

This one is cheesy as can be but I’ll be damned if it isn’t fun. The performance was dubbed “Something Grand” and they weren’t lying. It featured 88 grand pianos on the field with pianists of all colors and ages playing boogie-woogie piano to open things up. Then, they are joined by a massive outfit of brass and woodwinds called the “Super Bowl Super Band.”

Throw in 44 leg-kicking members of The Rockettes and a crowd of big-haired women dressed as cheerleaders before Chubby Checker blows the lid off the joint in a silver sequined top at midfield singing “The Super Bowl Twist.” It’s a marvel and a halftime show that’s totally underrated.

The Rolling Stones — Super Bowl XL (2006)

In the mid-2000s wave of classic-rock halftime shows, the Stones showed why they could still sell out stadiums across the world that late into their career. Performing on a stage shaped like their iconic mouth logo, Mick Jagger pranced across the stage like it was 1966.

The band only performed three songs, opting to perform them entirely, rather than going for the medley treatment. This show rocked but the inclusion of 2005’s “Rough Justice,” and the audience’s silent reaction when Jagger announced it, hurt the replay value today.

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Country Artists — Super Bowl XXVIII (1994)

The year after Michael Jackson forever changed the halftime show, the game was held in Atlanta and an all-star ’90s country jam was put together. The energy of this show is high from the start, with Clint Black and Tanya Tucker kicking things off with a pair of great songs.

Eventually, Travis Tritt and The Judds round out the show and the crowd goes wild. The fact that the game was in a dome this year helped make the performance look more like an actual concert. When it comes to country music, you either love it or hate it — and if you love it, this show was fantastic. Oddly, it’s the only time country has been the sole music offered at the halftime show.

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Coldplay — Super Bowl 50 (2016)

Coldplay brought back a couple of the greatest halftime performers ever to help with their show at Super Bowl 50. This feel-good show managed to jam eight tunes and three top performers into 13 minutes, without a moment of downtime.

Coldplay did some of their most beloved tracks but were immediately upstaged by Bruno Mars and Beyoncé, who came onstage for “Uptown Funk” and “Formation,” each dressed in all-black outfits. Honestly, when Coldplay returned to the stage, the crowd had to be a little disappointed.

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Paul McCartney — Super Bowl XXXIX (2005)

After the FCC went crazy over the “wardrobe malfunction” in 2004’s halftime show, classic rockers handled the next six performances. Paul McCartney was first and he did not disappoint in a show definitely aimed at older fans.

Macca and his tight touring band ripped through four fan favorites, including three Beatles numbers. The live audience was hyped the whole time, the stage looked awesome, the band sounded great and McCartney looked like he was having a blast. You can’t ask for much more from a halftime show.

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Katy Perry — Super Bowl XLIX (2015)

There’s arguably never been a more visually stunning halftime performance than Katy Perry’s. She kicked it off riding a massive metal lion, performed on a state-of-the-art digital stage, wore multiple outfits and managed to throw a colorful beach party in Arizona. Perry also sounded great, kept the crowd hyped and did her greatest hits. Plus, this performance marked the return of Missy Elliott, who managed to upstage Perry on her own night! This one was a pure feast for the eyes and a ton of fun.

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Michael Jackson — Super Bowl XXVII (1993)

Without question, this was the most influential halftime performance ever done. This was what turned the show into a must-see event headlined by a major star. The crowd goes nuts for every move Michael Jackson makes, especially when he launches into “Billie Jean.” The only knock against it is that Jackson’s set list is pretty weak. There’s no “Thriller,” no “Beat It” and no “Bad.” But this performance is still more electric than most others that followed it and forever changed the way the show was produced.

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The Who — Super Bowl XLIV (2010)

Despite Roger Daltrey and Pete Townshend being in their mid-60s when they played the Super Bowl, no halftime show has ever rocked harder. The band sounded incredible and the stage, loaded with laser-lighting and fog effects, was rock at its most overblown.

The fact that this halftime show aired on CBS and three of the songs performed were used as theme songs for the network’s various “CSI” shows may be suspect but it doesn’t take away from the power of the performance. Just try not to bang your head during “Baba O’Riley”!

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Aerosmith & ‘N Sync — Super Bowl XXXV (2001)

When MTV produced the 2001 halftime show, the network came through with a star-studded, crowd-pleasing show that definitely keeps your attention from start to finish. ’N Sync opened it up and got the crowd pumped with “Bye, Bye, Bye” before Aerosmith slowed things down with “I Don’t Want to Miss a Thing.” From there, the two acts went back and forth doing then-recent hits.

The inclusion of Britney Spears, Nelly and Mary J. Blige on “Walk This Way” make this one of the most stacked shows ever done. There was nothing self-serious in this last Super Bowl halftime show of the pre-9/11 world, which is exactly how it should’ve been.

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Janet Jackson & P. Diddy — Super Bowl XXXVIII (2004)

The most infamous halftime show ever performed kicked off with Jessica Simpson yelling at the crowd and finished with the nipple seen ‘round the world. Before Janet Jackson’s “wardrobe malfunction,” this one was actually a very good halftime show, even if almost the whole thing sounded pre-recorded.

All of Jackson’s performances were great and the inclusion of Nelly and P. Diddy marked the first — and arguably only — time hip-hop was truly incorporated into the show. Kid Rock was also pretty great, slipping a few risque lyrics past the censors and keeping the energy sky high. With or without the nudity, this was a pretty great halftime show.

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Bruce Springsteen And The E Street Band — Super Bowl XLIII (2009)

If any American band was born to play a halftime show, it was the E Streeters. From the start, Springsteen commands the entire global audience, telling the viewers to “step back from the guacamole dip” and “turn the television all the way up!” After that, they turned a Tampa football stadium into a New Jersey seaside bar.

The four-song set was nonstop energy and the band sounded incredible as ever. The live crowd could be heard singing along to every lyric of “Born to Run,” and the fact that E Street Band members Clarence Clemons and Danny Federici would be dead within four years makes it a lasting time capsule for fans.

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Lady Gaga — Super Bowl LI (2017)

Opening with a powerhouse performance of “God Bless America” before being lowered from the top of the stadium on wires is the type of move only Lady Gaga could have pulled off. The dynamic performer then proceeded to rip through six career-spanning hits without a single guest artist joining her on stage.

She sounded amazing, she looked fantastic and she proved that she knows how to keep a crowd entertained. Gaga absolutely slayed her shot at the halftime show, proving why she’s one of the most beloved entertainers of her generation.

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Bruno Mars — Super Bowl XLVIII (2014)

About the only person on Earth who could follow Beyoncé’s 2013 halftime performance was Bruno Mars. He showed his unmatched energy and started the performance playing a legit drum solo before jumping right into “Locked Out of Heaven.” The sound was booming and his whole band looked like a million bucks in matching gold jackets and black ties.

The inclusion of the Red Hot Chili Peppers sounds like a terrible idea on paper, but it actually proved to be a great collaboration. The energy was jacked up from start to finish and Mars sounded flawless. This one belongs right near the top of the list.

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Prince — Super Bowl XLI (2007)

Prince’s halftime performance has taken on mythical status, and for good reason. He stood on a massive stage shaped like his infamous name symbol and absolutely owned the night, keeping the energy sky-high and shredding on his guitar. He looked like he was born to play this stage.

It could be argued he leaned too heavily on other artists’ songs, with half of the songs in his performance being covers. However, his closing performance of “Purple Rain,” in the middle of the rain that was falling on the stage, is as legendary as anything that’s ever happened at a Super Bowl — during the game or at halftime.

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Beyonce — Super Bowl XLVII (2013)

From the pyro-filled intro that featured a Vince Lombardi speech playing over Beyoncé being shown on a platform in silhouette, it was clear this was going to be an epic performance. Bey’s electric dance moves, her powerhouse live vocals and her female guitarist who had sparks shooting out of her instrument were just some of the things that made this one of the all-time greats.

The energy was cranked to the hilt from the open and the reunion of Destiny’s Child made fans lose it even more. Beyoncé owned the stage better than anyone since Prince and the moment when she blows a kiss to the camera after “Crazy in Love” is one of the Super Bowl’s best moments. A combination of spectacle, surprise and pure performing muscle, you can make a strong case that Beyoncé had the greatest halftime performance ever — but we rank one a bit higher.

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U2 — Super Bowl XXXVI (2002)

Halftime simply never got better than this. For the first Super Bowl halftime performance after 9/11, U2 was chosen and it turned out to be a perfect call. The atmosphere and direction of the performance looks more like an actual concert than a halftime show and the band elected to do just three songs, each loaded with passion: “Beautiful Day,” “MLK” and “Where the Streets Have No Name.”

During the performance, a massive screen behind the band showed the names of everyone who had died in the attacks, making for arguably the most touching moment in Super Bowl history. If you don’t get chills during the intro to “Where the Streets Have No Name,” you might want to check your pulse. This was an incredible tribute and a powerhouse performance when we all needed it most. There’s never been a better halftime performance than U2’s.

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Maroon 5's Forgettable Super Bowl Halftime Show: Review ...

04-02-2019 · Maroon 5’s Halftime Show Felt Designed to Be Forgotten. SpongeBob, Travis Scott, and Big Boi joined for a pageant of doing the least. Possibly the …

04-02-2019

SpongeBob, Travis Scott, and Big Boi joined for a pageant of doing the least.

Mike Segar / Reuters

Possibly the most distinctive voice in Maroon 5’s halftime show was Drake’s, prerecorded and piped in, praising Xanax as a sleep aid. The most recognizable face was that of SpongeBob SquarePants, who popped up on viewers’ screens just before a cartoon comet hit Maroon 5’s set, sending it into polite spouts of patio-furniture flames. The apocalypse, the implication seemed to be, will be tepid.

How fitting that the main attractions of Maroon 5’s concert were characters not on the stage, and not even in the stadium. To the extent that this halftime show will be remembered at all, it’ll be for outside factors: a boycott of the NFL triggered by Colin Kaepernick’s protests against racism; Atlanta’s queasy clearing of homeless camps in preparation for the Super Bowl; Tom Brady’s sixth ring; the trauma of seeing the Bud Knight’s skull crushed by a Game of Thrones brute. “Moves Like Jagger” is the sort of prescription-grade jingle meant to jam brain circuitry, but even it couldn’t, on Sunday night, whistle away the show’s dreary context.

Maroon 5, masterful at creating hits that take an active mental effort to distinguish from one another, did not enter this gig with the burden of great expectations. But the band still might have delivered neat arena gimmicks, like a giant swiveling The Voice throne or something. Instead they did the minimum, which perhaps was one of the things that the M-shaped stage stood for. The only story line came in the form of the singer Adam Levine’s striptease. At the start, his proto-Facetune cheekbones glinted above a chassis of athleisure; by the end, abs flaunted clip-art tattoos. To think it was a scandal when Janet Jackson removed such a smaller fraction of her shirt.

Mild pyro, drone-lamp skywriting, a drum line dressed for a gay bar, an imported black choir: All are tropes from more spectacular halftime shows of past, and they were mostly deployed here in a subdued, budget-friendly fashion. The exception was the gospel singer whose geyser of a voice highlighted just what Levine hadn’t achieved all along. His whimpery croon generally offers the only unique flavor in Maroon 5’s stews, but here its cloying tang was barely discernible. At no point did he convey that he wanted the folks at home to pause in their analysis of Brady’s shaky first half, though many of them no doubt did so anyway, for a moment, to sing along about the girl with the broken smile.

At least Levine’s vocals were broadcast on TV. Travis Scott, the Houston rap experimenter who really has nothing to do with Maroon 5, saw long patches of his “Sicko Mode” verses squelched by censors. The profanity of his lyrics would have seemed to present a foreseeable and work-aroundable problem, but—again—this was not a show that created the impression of anyone stretching for excellence. Scott still gave a shot at interesting visuals, radiating wolfish energy as he stalked around while wearing some sort of alien tool belt. Big Boi of Outkast brought a greater jolt of electricity later on, as well as the show’s most effective Atlanta shout-out, by rapping his caffeinating 2003 hit “The Way You Move” while swaddled in a majestic fur.

What was SpongeBob doing there? Fans of the Nickelodeon meme machine have long lobbied for a halftime tribute to a beloved SquarePants scene set at a football game, and after the show creator Stephen Hillenburg’s death at age 57 this past November, the call was heeded. The Yellow One’s inclusion was … touching isn’t the right word, because the backstory to the shout-out wasn’t conveyed to viewers. Charming—sure, SpongeBob is always charming. But maybe the best term for the interlude is useful. It filled time, it changed the subject, and it assisted in Maroon 5 fulfilling what felt like a hidden agenda suited for tense times: to be forgotten.

Super Bowl 2020 halftime show review: Jennifer Lopez and ...

Super Bowl 2020 halftime show review: Jennifer Lopez and Shakira bring a big performance to Miami A closer look at the Super Bowl LIV halftime show

NFL: Super Bowl LIV-San Francisco 49ers vs Kansas City Chiefs
Jasen Vinlove / USA TODAY Sports

Superstar singers and dancers Shakira and Jennifer Lopez took the stage during halftime at Super Bowl LIV and absolutely stole the show. The two transformed the field into a concert and each brought their unique elements of dance and flavor to the performance. 

Last year, many people were disappointed with the performance by Maroon 5, Travis Scott and Big Boi, but fans are a lot happier with who the NFL put on center stage this year. 

Shakira began her set with, "Hola Miami" and brought electricity to Hard Rock Stadium with her high energy performance. In classic Shakira style, her hips did not lie and she danced like the world was watching. Her dance ability rivals her singing ability and gives her the superstardom that a day like Super Bowl Sunday deserves.

Just as deserving of the spotlight is Jennifer Lopez, who appears to defy the laws of age. The 50-year-old looks as good as she ever has and brought costume changes, her own dancing skills and her exceptional voice to the stage. Lopez followed Shakira, but was able to live up to her performance. 

Ahead of the game, the two singers sat down to discuss what fans could expect from the performance and said while their styles are different, they complement each other well. And complement each other they did. 

When the two joined forces to end the performance, they managed to raise the bar again. What escalated their performance was a children's choir led by J.Lo's talented daughter Emme Maribel Muñiz, who seems like a star in the making herself.

As we all know, these days things are only as iconic as Twitter says they are and this year fans are already talking about how this might be in the running for best of all time. 

Here are some of the best reactions from the show:

Even though she didn't play in the game, some think Shakira deserves the Super Bowl MVP award.

The fans loved this duo.

Jennifer Lopez found a way to honor Puerto Rico.

The two did not take the stage alone, they were joined by Bad Bunny and J Balvin.

Of course, what's a Twitter moment without a joke? 

Will "Hips Don't Lie" ever get old? The short answer: No. 

The most important critic however might just be Alex Rodriguez, J.Lo's fiance, who loved the performance. The baseball legend was living his best life in the pit of the performance. 

Super Bowl Halftime Show: Lady Gaga Show Review

February 5, 2017 9:25 PM EST. L ady Gaga’s Super Bowl halftime show stands as among the very best in the history of the form, racing ambitiously through the artist’s entire career and putting ...

Lady Gaga’s Super Bowl halftime show stands as among the very best in the history of the form, racing ambitiously through the artist’s entire career and putting forward the qualities of the artist that just work. It was alternately deeply felt and archly ironic, overblown to the point that the camera didn’t know where to look. It was the artist in full—perhaps the purest expression of what Gaga’s fans like about her.

Lady Gaga came into the Super Bowl as an act on a bit of a downswing, with her album Joanne having been met with reserved critical notice and no real hit single. Worse still, after her booking came a contested election result and the expectation that she—never an overtly political performer beyond specific, easily understood causes—might somehow “get political” in some undefined manner. I’d argue that her lack of a statement was the statement: America’s problems are not Gaga’s to solve, and she has every right to want Trump voters to buy “Bad Romance” on iTunes.

But perhaps the best argument against malaise at large is working hard to put forth as much quality and energy as one can. Her performance began with a performance of “God Bless America” and “This Land is Your Land” that felt less substantial than the declaration of independence that followed—a pop star unbound by the usual rules of gravity, stadium safety and good sense. Any singer could probably have trained enough to have pulled off Gaga’s aerial stunts, but few would have been so bold to open the show with them. Similarly, few in possession of a famous civil-rights anthem (in Gaga’s case, the LGBT-equality song “Born This Way,” a tune that feels less hokey now than it did upon release) would have uncorked it third in the setlist. Both Katy Perry and Madonna—recent headliners and no slouches in the spectacle department—saved their big statements for the show’s final moments.

It was all dopey, earnest fun, an escape from tough realities studded with crystal scepters (for “Telephone”) and, gloriously harkening back to the early days of Gaga’s career, a key-tar (“Just Dance”). Indeed, the halftime show felt like a moment for Gaga to return to the basics, and not in the way she did with her faux-roots music reinvention on last year’s album. At its core, pop music has an uncomplicated, primal appeal—to make you dance and make you feel. Gaga was smart enough, in a setting that bears endless temptations to pile on visual distractions, to actually strip down her act to the fundamentals. Even the absence of Beyoncé, a guest vocalist on “Telephone,” seemed to work in Gaga’s favor; the world-encompassing pop icon who dominated two recent halftime shows and the week’s news cycle might have dwarfed the relatively humble ambitions of the act.

Toward the end, she flirted with taking this simplicity too far, as in her “Million Reasons” performance, oddly led into with a question as to whether the audience was feeling good. (We were, Gaga—but this is a breakup anthem, so…) But she always managed to keep the audience from looking at their phone screens, studding that same performance with shout-outs to her parents that managed to seem anything but gratuitous, and a final moment, in which the singer strode into the crowd and hugged an audience member while crooning the word “Stay.” Was it a reference to the refugee crisis and recent legislation, or just a moment of affection? We probably won’t find out anytime soon, but the moment was perfectly pitched for trying times: Tinged with oddity and tension and resolved through humanity and grace.

In her final number, “Bad Romance,” she performed a facsimile of her camp-classic music-video dance so close that it actually read poorly on such a big stage—but the eye could be drawn upward, endlessly, by the fireworks blowing up above Houston’s NRG Stadium. Or it didn’t matter, and the striving efforts of a group of dancers going as hard as they possibly could have, in the service of a message of inclusivity, was enough of a statement for tonight. It may not have been political—but it was worth heeding all the same.

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Review: The Weeknd’s Super Bowl LV Halftime Show Performance

08-02-2021 · After Super Bowl LV, the Weeknd’s Gotta Retire the Red Suit Every Super Bowl Halftime Show Since 1993, Ranked How ‘Blinding Lights’ Used Retro Sounds and Modern Bass to …

08-02-2021

From stem to stern, it was a night of keeping up appearances, a simulation of normalcy in a year where normal doesn’t seem possible. Photo: Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for TW

Ten winters ago, a trove of snaking, lascivious R&B tracks appeared seemingly out of thin air, credited to someone or thing called the Weeknd. They were studies in stark contrasts: “Loft Music” floated gossamer samples of Brooklyn indie rockers Beach House over trap drums, and “What You Need” sunk a sample of Aaliyah’s voice under gauzy synths, her whisper bubbling up through the watery mix like a lover emerging from a warm bath, all of this in service to an angelic voice uttering the most devilish advances. The singer, an East Toronto native and recent college dropout named Abel Tesfaye, gave voice to our darkest late-night moods, to the allure of pushing a body past its limit in pursuit of pleasures both psychedelic and carnal. In March 2011, the Weeknd released House of Balloons, a mixtape sequenced like a journey through the highs, lows, and lonesome aftereffects of a wild night out, setting the scene by advising the listener in the first song that “You’ll wanna be high for this,” then wandering through strip clubs, parties, and after parties to the inevitable anxieties and pangs of withdrawal that surface as you sweat everything out the next day. The Weeknd turned R&B on its head without showing his face. Without glossy videos or a lively social-media presence this in the days before Instagram caught on Abel lingered in your head like stifled urges.

In the intervening years, Tesfaye has evolved from an invisible man into a ubiquitous one, careful pivot by careful pivot, logging increasingly successful hits increasingly removed from the chunky, post-genre soup of his early mixtapes. The sound got cleaner. Tesfaye sought out pop and dance music veterans like Daft Punk and Max Martin and duetted with Ed Sheeran and Ariana Grande. He put together an accomplished live show. He honed his dance moves. He tinkered with the formula. He fashioned himself into a pop star. And on Sunday night, Tesfaye took the stage for the Super Bowl LV halftime show a decade after the early rumblings about the Toronto singer making perfect, cherubic filth. The grit from those early days was lost amid the Hollywood glamour of the display, an interesting choice for an artist whose last album spoke profoundly to a desire to leave all that behind. The show delivered a vivid array of elaborate, expensive set pieces that hit the necessary notes for a halftime gig — no matter who you get as talent, you’re getting snazzy lighting rigs, fireworks, and a massive dance routine on the field — and never missed a mark but also never really tapped into the gravity of the reality that this is probably the only live arena show most Americans have seen in a year, and it will most likely be the last that any of us will catch again until sometime next year. The halftime show — the whole night, really — felt piped in from a timeline where nothing ever went wrong.

To be fair, the Weeknd isn’t American, nor has he mixed politics with his music. Pressuring performers to pepper their music with overarching social messaging is how we end up with J-Lo screaming “Let’s Get Loud” at the presidential inauguration. The Weeknd’s specialty is escapism, pulling you into a world grislier than your own, and in the introductory minutes of his performance, the seedy, cyberpunk landscapes conjured in his latest records seemed to cross over and touch the real world. The robot choirs and dark cityscapes seen as “Call Out My Name” melted into “Starboy” brought into greater focus the feeling that the Weeknd makes music for unseen movies, soundtracks for the listener’s own personal spells of debauchery. These visuals borrowed from notable if obvious touchstones in films like Blade Runner, The Fog, Enter the Void, and the Joel Schumacher Batman films, contrasting bright city lights with a suffocating, smoky darkness. (Other, perhaps more glaring visual influences were floated throughout the night: On Twitter, it was noted that the masked and bandaged backup dancers in “Can’t Feel My Face” favored Pluto, the pyromaniacal tether from Jordan Peele’s Us, and Michael Jackson’s name came up, though what I got from the parade of red-and-black clad dancers on the field at the end of the performance was the “Thriller” number in the Super Bowl episode of Glee.) The Weeknd has earned this moment, and watching him smirking pridefully through entertaining an audience of millions was an incredible bookend to the borderline anonymity of the mixtape trilogy days (and maybe even a useful blueprint for a future residency somewhere in Las Vegas).

Jamming nine songs into a 14-minute set, the Weeknd made a case for himself as a pop phenomenon with staying power but also highlighted some of the least-interesting moments in his catalog. “The Hills” crushed, and the choir arrangement made it sound even eviler than on the record. They flubbed “I Feel it Coming,” hiking up the tempo to match “Can’t Feel My Face,” which also ran too fast. “Earned It” remains a slog. “Save Your Tears” was a highlight, though this staging couldn’t match the pyrotechnical drama we got when it was performed at the American Music Awards last year. Teasing Siouxsie and the Banshees’ “Happy House” without playing “Glass Table Girls,” the House of Balloons classic that sampled it, stung. “Blinding Lights” worked well as the requisite enormous audio/video spectacle that necessitates the aerial camera work, but what really would’ve put it over the top is finally mashing it up with A-Ha’s “Take on Me.” These picks seemed designed to nudge people toward the greatest-hits compilation,The Highlights, that was released last week in anticipation of a bump in streams after the game. (The Highlights also boasts a tracklist bafflingly short on the best Weeknd songs; one wonders how many points he’d whiff in a Verzuz.)

But there’s something dark and weird and ironic about the Weeknd in his After Hours era that’s being left off the table here. From the bandaged faces to the gaudy lounge lizard couture, the aesthetics gesture at ideas that go unexplored. As was the case with the pop-leaning songs it highlighted, this show nailed its aesthetic with ease, but it struggled to make you feel anything. (Well, maybe you started to wonder what a fully realized After Hours tour might’ve accomplished.) It felt chipper when it shouldn’t have, which was true of the entire evening, from the frustrating, continued, machine-like efficacy of Tom Brady to the obnoxious togetherness-porn of ad spots like the two-minute call from Bruce Springsteen to find common ground in the middle of the road, or the one that suggests that, actually, Gwen Stefani and Blake Shelton are polar opposites and not just different permutations of the same kind of wholesome American showbiz shmaltz. (The evening’s legitimate successes in contrast were the Corona beer ad featuring Snoop Dogg and Bad Bunny and the duet between country vet Eric Church and R&B icon Jazmine Sullivan on the national anthem, which, in spite of all the overbearing symbolism, went almost unnaturally well.)

From stem to stern, it was a night of keeping up appearances, a simulation of normalcy in a year where normal doesn’t seem possible. Maybe some people forgot about the heaviness of everything for a couple of hours last night. But at what cost? Cramming 25,000 people into a stadium during a pandemic we’ve canceled every live engagement to curtail sends a peculiar message; the imminent spike in COVID cases we’re likely to see as a result of turning Tampa Bay into a giant superspreader event can’t be worth whatever crumb of respite it delivered, though we all know, to quote a song we should’ve heard last night, the money is the motive.

So Now the Weeknd Is Our Collective Escape From Hell?

Superbowl Halftime Show Review

Superbowl Halftime Show Review. Olivia Durcan, Staff Writer | February 13, 2021. Promotional image of The Weeknd for the 2021 Super Bowl Halftime Show. On Sunday, Feb. 7, 2021, the 55th annual Pepsi Superbowl Halftime Show was performed by Abel Tesfaye, also known as The Weeknd. Interestingly enough, the NFL did not provide the stage for The ...

Promotional image of The Weeknd for the 2021 Super Bowl Halftime Show.

Promotional image of The Weeknd for the 2021 Super Bowl Halftime Show.

On Sunday, Feb. 7, 2021, the 55th annual Pepsi Superbowl Halftime Show was performed by Abel Tesfaye, also known as The Weeknd. Interestingly enough, the NFL did not provide the stage for The Weeknd, as the singer invested 7 million dollars of his own money into the show at the Raymond James Stadium in Tampa, Florida.

I’m not one for sports, but when I saw the blazing and glittery red jacket the Weeknd sported, I was intrigued and wanted to watch the show. I also had no idea what to expect for the song list, theme and choreography for the performance.

The songs performed during the halftime show as listed below:

“Starboy” “The Hills” “Can’t Feel My Face” “I Feel It Coming” “Save Your Tears” “Earned It (Fifty Shades of Grey)” “House of Balloons / Glass Table Girls”

“Blinding Lights”

The Weeknd kicked off his performance with a popular song of his, “Starboy.” I thought the entrance was rushed and slightly disorganized because the singer began singing in the middle of his song, rather than starting from the beginning. However, he managed to gain the attention of the crowd with an iconic sparkly red jacket.

Leading into the second song, “The Hills,” the singer had more time to incorporate background choreography and effects, including smoke and blinding lights, which I thought were pretty cool and satisfying to view. During the middle of the song, the singer went behind the stage, took a camera in one hand, mic in another and began singing “Can’t Feel My Face.” I’m not sure what the reasoning behind this was, but I found it entertaining to tie playfulness into the performance.

What happens next is one of my favorite parts: fireworks. The Weeknd came back out onto the stage and performed “I Feel It Coming.” With an intense 360 degree spin and a lead into the chorus, the fireworks riled up the audience, continuing the performance on a high note.

With songs from his new album “After Hours,” the next song on the list was “Save Your Tears.” The tune lit the lights of the stage with special background music and effects. This was my second favorite part of the performance, as the lights were visually appealing and added nice touches to this segment of the show. Cue the violins, a widely-known song of The Weeknd, “Earned It (Fifty Shades of Grey),” was next. It was hard to miss the shiny jackets of the violinists/background dancers of the show, which I thought was another smart touch as The Weeknd himself also sported a shiny jacket. With another dramatic and appealing ending, I can confidently say this was one of my personal favorite productions.

Including dancers with bandages on their faces, it was time for the next song in the list, “House of Balloons / Glass Table Girls.” This was one of the shortest segments of the show, elapsing only a minute. The timely formation and march of the dancers quickly transitioned into the finale of the show, with the song “Blinding Lights.” This part of the performance was engaging and eye-catching, however, I wished there were more lights down to see the dancers better because of how large the stadium was and how quick the movements were.

The performance ended with close-up shots of the singer and fireworks. I think having a tracklist featuring older and more known songs mixed with newer ones was a smart idea. However, I do feel though parts of the show were rushed and the timing could have been better. Nonetheless, it was an excellent performance.

Super Bowl LII

18-12-2021 · Super Bowl LII was an American football game played to determine the champion of the National Football League (NFL) for the 2017 season.The National Football Conference (NFC) champion Philadelphia Eagles defeated the American Football Conference (AFC) and defending Super Bowl LI champion New England Patriots, 41–33, to win their first Super Bowl and their first NFL title since 1960.

18-12-2021
2018 edition of the Super Bowl
"2018 Super Bowl" redirects here. For the Super Bowl that was played at the completion of the 2018 season, see Super Bowl LIII.
Super Bowl LII logo.svg
Super Bowl LII
Philadelphia Eagles (1)
(NFC)
(13–3)
New England Patriots (1)
(AFC)
(13–3)
41 33
Head coach:
Doug Pederson
Head coach:
Bill Belichick
1234 Total
PHI 913712 41
NE 39147 33
DateFebruary 4, 2018StadiumU.S. Bank Stadium, Minneapolis, MinnesotaMVPNick Foles, quarterbackFavoritePatriots by 5RefereeGene SteratoreAttendance67,612CeremoniesNational anthemPinkCoin tossHershel W. Williams, representing Medal of Honor recipientsHalftime showJustin TimberlakeTV in the United StatesNetworkNBC
Universo (Spanish language)AnnouncersAl Michaels (play-by-play)
Cris Collinsworth (analyst)
Michele Tafoya (sideline reporter)
Edgar López (play-by-play- Universo)
René Giraldo and Rolando Cantú (analysts- Universo)
Verónica Contreras (sidelines- Universo)Nielsen ratings43.1 (national)
56.2 (Philadelphia)
55.9 (Boston)
U.S. viewership: 103.4 million est. avg.[1]Market share68 (national)Cost of 30-second commercial million[2]Radio in the United StatesNetworkWestwood One
ESPN Deportes Radio (Spanish language)AnnouncersKevin Harlan (play-by-play)
Boomer Esiason and Mike Holmgren (analysts)
Ed Werder and Tony Boselli (sideline reporters)
Álvaro Martín (play-by-play- ESPN Deportes Radio)
Raúl Allegre (analyst- ESPN Deportes Radio)
John Sutcliffe (sideline- ESPN Deportes Radio)
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Super Bowl LII was an American football game played to determine the champion of the National Football League (NFL) for the 2017 season. The National Football Conference (NFC) champion Philadelphia Eagles defeated the American Football Conference (AFC) and defending Super Bowl LI champion New England Patriots, 41–33, to win their first Super Bowl[3] and their first NFL title since 1960. The game was played on February 4, 2018, at U.S. Bank Stadium in Minneapolis, Minnesota.[4] This was the second time that a Super Bowl was played in Minneapolis, the northernmost city to ever host the event, after Super Bowl XXVI at the Metrodome during the 1991 season.[5] It was also the sixth Super Bowl held in a cold-weather city.[6]

New England finished the regular season with an AFC-best 13–3 record, then extended their record Super Bowl appearances to ten, their third in four years, and their eighth under the leadership of head coach Bill Belichick and MVP quarterback Tom Brady. Philadelphia also finished the regular season with an NFC-best 13–3 record but entered the playoffs as underdogs after starting quarterback Carson Wentz suffered a season-ending injury late in the regular season; prior to his injury, Wentz was the media and fan favorite to win MVP[7] after leading his team to an 11–2 start. Backup quarterback Nick Foles, who was widely underestimated and discredited by pre-game broadcasts, was the Eagles' starting quarterback for the rest of the season. With Foles, the Eagles advanced to their third Super Bowl appearance, having previously lost to the Oakland Raiders in Super Bowl XV and to the Patriots in Super Bowl XXXIX.

Several records were set during Super Bowl LII, including most yards gained in an NFL game by both teams combined (1,151), fewest punts from both teams in a Super Bowl (one), and most points scored by a Super Bowl losing team (33).[8] The game was settled after the Eagles converted a fumble recovery deep within Patriots territory to a field goal with 1:05 remaining to extend their lead to eight points, and Brady's Hail Mary pass fell incomplete as time expired. Foles, who completed 28 of 43 pass attempts for 373 yards and three touchdowns with one interception, and also caught a one-yard touchdown pass on a trick play, was named Super Bowl MVP.[9] Foles' touchdown catch later became known as the Philly Special and joined NFL lore alongside his unexpected performance.

With the loss, the Patriots became the fifth defending Super Bowl champions to lose in the following year's title game, after the 1978 Dallas Cowboys, the 1983 Washington Redskins, the 1997 Green Bay Packers, and the 2014 Seattle Seahawks, and would be followed by the 2020 Kansas City Chiefs.

The broadcast of the game on NBC had the smallest Super Bowl audience in nine years, with an average of 103.4 million viewers. Average television viewership for the halftime show, headlined by Justin Timberlake, was 106.6 million American television viewers, 9 percent less than the previous year.[10]

Background

Host-city selection

U.S. Bank Stadium in Minneapolis, Minnesota, where Super Bowl LII was held

On October 8, 2013, the league announced that three venues were vying to host Super Bowl LII:[11][12][13]

  • U.S. Bank Stadium in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Minneapolis hosted Super Bowl XXVI in 1992 at the Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome, which was torn down after the 2013 season and replaced in 2016 by U.S. Bank Stadium.
  • Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis, Indiana. The stadium hosted Super Bowl XLVI in 2012.[14]
  • Mercedes-Benz Superdome in New Orleans, Louisiana. The city has hosted 10 Super Bowls, including seven at the Superdome, most recently Super Bowl XLVII in 2013.[15][16][17]

On May 20, 2014, the league's owners picked Minneapolis at their meeting in Atlanta, Georgia.[18][19]

Teams

The NFC was represented by the number-one playoff seed Philadelphia Eagles, while the AFC was represented by the number-one playoff seed New England Patriots, marking the fourth time in the previous five years that the Super Bowl had featured the top team from each conference.[20]

Philadelphia Eagles

Main article: 2017 Philadelphia Eagles season
Nick Foles in 2014

The Eagles finished the regular season with a record of 13–3, the same as New England, Minnesota, and Pittsburgh, but the various tie-breaking provisions gave them the NFC's top seed in the 2017–18 NFL playoffs. It was a substantial improvement for the team under second-year head coach Doug Pederson; the Eagles finished the previous season with a 7–9 record. In the 2017 season, the team scored 457 points (third in the NFL), while giving up just 295 (fourth) points.[21]

The offense was led by Pro Bowl quarterback Carson Wentz. In just his second season, he recorded a passer rating of 101.9, throwing for 3,296 yards and 33 touchdowns, with only seven interceptions. His top target was Pro Bowl tight end Zach Ertz, who caught 74 passes for 824 yards and eight touchdowns. Other contributors were two receivers acquired from off-season free agency: Alshon Jeffery, who caught 57 passes for 789 yards and nine scores; and Torrey Smith, who had 36 receptions for 430 yards. Meanwhile, third-year receiver Nelson Agholor had the best season of his career, hauling in 62 passes for 768 yards and eight touchdowns, a higher total in each category than in his previous two seasons combined. The Eagles rushing attack also benefited from two recently acquired players, LeGarrette Blount and Jay Ajayi. Blount, an off-season signing who won a Super Bowl with the Patriots, gained 776 rushing yards and two touchdowns, while Ajayi, picked up by a mid-season trade with the Miami Dolphins, rushed for 873 yards and caught 24 passes for 154 yards combined with the two teams. Philadelphia also had a superb offensive line, led by two Pro Bowl selections: Tackle Lane Johnson and Guard Brandon Brooks, along with all pro center Jason Kelce.[22]

The Eagles defense allowed the fourth-fewest yards in the league (4,904). Defensive tackle Fletcher Cox made the Pro Bowl for the third time in his career, recording 512 sacks and two fumble recoveries, and he had plenty of help around him, such as former Patriots defensive end Chris Long, who had five sacks and forced four fumbles, and defensive end Brandon Graham, who led the team with 912 sacks. Middle linebacker Nigel Bradham led the team in combined tackles with 88. The Eagles secondary featured Pro Bowl safety Malcolm Jenkins, who had 76 combined tackles and two interceptions, along with cornerback Patrick Robinson, who led the team with four interceptions.[23]

Philadelphia had stormed to the top of the NFC by winning 10 of their first 12 games, but suffered a major setback on December 10, when Wentz went down with a season-ending ACL tear and was replaced by journeyman backup quarterback Nick Foles, who was playing for his third team in as many years and his second stint with the Eagles. After Wentz's injury, many analysts wrote off the remainder of the Eagles' season as they believed they would not recover from his loss. Surprising analysts, Foles was able to lead the team to victory in that game, as well as the next two. The Eagles rested Foles for their game and were led by third-string quarterback Nate Sudfeld for their meaningless game against the Cowboys in Week 17, a game they lost, but in the Eagles' two playoff games, Foles threw for a combined total of 598 yards, three touchdowns and no interceptions, replicating the excellent performance of Wentz to carry the Eagles to the NFC title.[24] The Eagles were not favored to win in any of their 2018 playoff appearances including Super Bowl LII. The team embraced their role as underdogs and were frequently seen wearing dog masks after each playoff victory as were their fans.

New England Patriots

Main article: 2017 New England Patriots season
Tom Brady in 2017

The Patriots entered the 2017 NFL season as defending Super Bowl champions. For the 16th time in their 18 seasons under 65-year old coach Bill Belichick, they recorded a double-digit win season, finishing the regular season with a record of 13–3, one of four teams (along with Philadelphia, Minnesota, and Pittsburgh) with that record. By virtue of the tie-breaking procedures, they were granted the AFC's number one overall seed in the 2017–18 NFL playoffs. The previous season's top wide receiver Julian Edelman went down in the preseason with a season-ending injury. Early season defensive struggles left the team with a 2–2 record after four weeks, and the worst overall defense in the league at that point.[25] The defense came together as a unit, and tightened up over the rest of the season however, with the Patriots going 11–1 after week 4. Their sole loss in the latter part of the season came in Week 14 to the Miami Dolphins, a division rival, though they were without star tight end Rob Gronkowski due to a one-game suspension for an unnecessary roughness call the prior week. The Patriots' defense was improved by several late-season free-agent signings, including Eric Lee, a defensive end, previously from the Buffalo Bills, whom the Patriots signed in Week 12, and James Harrison, a perennial All-Pro for the Pittsburgh Steelers, whom the Patriots picked up off waivers after Christmas. In just six games for New England, Lee recorded 312 sacks, a safety, and an interception.[26] In his only regular season game with the Patriots, Harrison recorded two sacks.[27]

During the regular season, New England's offense led the league in yards gained (6,307) and ranked second in points scored (458). The 40-year-old Brady finished his 18th season with a league-leading 4,577 passing yards, 32 touchdowns and just eight interceptions, earning him his 13th selection to the Pro Bowl and his third league MVP award. One change that helped make up for the loss of Edelman was the acquisition of receiver Brandin Cooks, who caught 65 passes for 1,082 yards and seven touchdowns. Brady was also aided by the healthy return of Gronkowski, who had played just eight games in the previous season, finishing this year with 69 catches for 1,084 yards and eight scores. Receiver Danny Amendola added 61 receptions for 659 yards, as well as another 240 yards returning punts. With the loss of their previous season's rushing leader LeGarrette Blount to free agency, Dion Lewis stepped up to take the lead, rushing for 896 yards and six touchdowns despite starting only eight games. He also caught 32 passes for 214 yards and two touchdowns and added 570 yards and another touchdown returning kickoffs. Rex Burkhead chipped in 518 all-purpose yards, 30 receptions, and eight touchdowns. In passing situations, the team relied heavily on running back James White, who caught 56 passes for 429 yards and rushed for 171 on the ground. These backs were aided by the blocking of fullback James Develin, who earned his first Pro Bowl selection. On special teams, kicker Stephen Gostkowski ranked second in the NFL with 156 points and fourth in field goals made with 37, while veteran special team ace Matthew Slater earned his seventh consecutive Pro Bowl selection.[28]

The Patriots' defense ranked only 29th in yards allowed (5,856), but ranked fifth in fewest points, giving up only 296. Defensive end Trey Flowers led the team with 612 sacks while also forcing two fumbles. Linebacker Kyle Van Noy had 73 tackles and 512 sacks. The Patriots also had a superb secondary, led by cornerbacks Malcolm Butler (two interceptions, three forced fumbles) and Stephon Gilmore (two interceptions, 47 solo tackles), as well as safeties Devin McCourty (97 combined tackles, one interception, one fumble recovery), Patrick Chung (84 tackles, one interception, two fumble recoveries) and Duron Harmon (four interceptions).[29]

Playoffs

Main article: 2017–18 NFL playoffs

In the playoffs, the Patriots earned a first-round bye and home-field advantage due to their status as the AFC's first overall seed. In the divisional round, they defeated the Tennessee Titans 35–14, as Brady passed for 337 yards and three touchdowns. In that game, the defense amassed eight quarterback sacks of Marcus Mariota and held the Titans' running game to 65 yards rushing.[30] They then defeated the Jacksonville Jaguars 24–20 in the AFC Championship Game, rallying from behind to win the game after the Jaguars jumped out to an early 14–3 lead and whose league-best defense stymied Brady and the rest of the offense for most of the first half.[citation needed] Down 20–10 in the fourth quarter, the Patriots' comeback was sealed by two Brady-led drives, both resulting in touchdown passes to Danny Amendola, as well as a key defensive stop by Stephon Gilmore, whose acrobatic block of a Blake Bortles pass ended Jacksonville's last chance to score. Rob Gronkowski was injured in the game with a concussion, leaving his status for the Super Bowl in doubt. Amendola was the breakout star for the Patriots during their two playoff wins, leading the team with 196 receiving yards, and serving as Brady's primary target.[31]

Philadelphia also earned a first-round bye and home-field advantage as the NFC's first overall seed. They started off the divisional round by narrowly defeating the Atlanta Falcons 15–10, stopping the Falcons on four consecutive plays after the Falcons had a first-down-and-goal situation on the Eagles' 9-yard line during their final drive.[32] They then soundly defeated the Minnesota Vikings 38–7 in the NFC Championship Game. Despite the Vikings scoring on their opening drive, the Eagles' defense held them to three punts, two turnovers on downs, two interceptions, and one lost fumble in their remaining drives of the game. Meanwhile, Foles had a great game, in which he completed 26 of 33 passes for 353 yards and three touchdowns.[33]

Pre-game notes

This game was a rematch of Super Bowl XXXIX. Only one player, Patriots starting quarterback Tom Brady, remained on either roster from that contest.[34]Bill Belichick, the Patriots' head coach in that contest, also remained in that position. Two Eagles, running back LeGarrette Blount and defensive lineman Chris Long, had been Patriots in 2017's Super Bowl LI.[35] The Eagles were 1–4 against the Brady/Belichick era Patriots prior to this game (preseason notwithstanding), including Super Bowl XXXIX, their one win being a 35–28 win at Gillette Stadium in December during their relatively weak 2015 season, where after falling behind 14–0, they proceeded to rally for 35 points and hold them down to only two more touchdowns on their end to win, allowing them to finally get their first revenge for eleven years prior.

The Patriots were the designated home team for Super Bowl LII, because the AFC team is the designated home team in even-numbered years and the NFC team in odd-numbered years. As the designated home team, the Patriots chose to wear their road white jerseys with navy blue pants, becoming the sixth team to wear their white jerseys as the home team and the third team to wear white in back-to-back Super Bowls, following the Dallas Cowboys in Super Bowls XII and XIII and again in Super Bowls XXVII and XXVIII.[citation needed] The Eagles therefore wore their standard home uniform of midnight green jerseys with white pants.[36] Twelve of the previous 13 Super Bowls had been won by teams wearing white jerseys. The last team to win a Super Bowl while wearing their home uniforms was the Green Bay Packers in Super Bowl XLV (who, coincidentally, had also worn green jerseys).[37]

Gambling establishments had the Patriots as 5 ½ point favorites and projected 47 ½ points scored.[38]

Operations

Security prescreening at the Mall of America before boarding the Metro Blue Line to U.S. Bank Stadium

To coordinate the game and 10 days of events, the National Football League temporarily operated an events office within the Minnesota Vikings office building next to U.S. Bank Stadium.[39] More than 150,000 visitors were expected to attend events associated with the Super Bowl over ten days.[40] Among them were some 5,000-plus media members; media day events and press conferences were held at The Mall of America in Bloomington, Minnesota.

No sales tax was collected on admission tickets to the game and related events, including parking.[41]

To increase security around U.S. Bank Stadium, the stadium's light rail station was shut down for 48 hours before the game,[42] and a nearby homeless shelter was temporarily moved beyond the security perimeter.[43] The Blue Line of the light rail system was only open to ticketholders and passengers with a Gameday Pass, while the Green Line only ran to Stadium Village station on the University of Minnesota campus before continuing on with restricted access. Metro Transit ran shuttle buses between light rail stations, as well as regular bus service was moved for several weeks due to street closures.[44][45] Thirty activist groups organized a rally and protest against police brutality, corporate greed, and racist practices. 17 people blocked the Green Line train for 90 minutes before the game, and 200 protesters blocked an entrance to the stadium's security perimeter.[46]

Under a 1998 agreement, the Patriots and Eagles owners split the tickets, and the league controlled the game presentation and entertainment in the stadium. The Patriots practiced at the Minnesota Vikings facilities in Eden Prairie while the Eagles used the University of Minnesota. The Eagles got the Vikings' locker room and sideline. The Vikings had advanced to the NFC Championship Game before losing to the Eagles; until that point, the possibility of the Vikings advancing to the Super Bowl and thus becoming the first team to play the game in its home stadium was plausible. Had that happened, the Vikings would have used their own locker rooms and training facilities, while the AFC champion would have used the University of Minnesota.[47]

Associated events

Nicollet Mall hosted the outdoor Super Bowl Live festival during the lead-up to the game.

The Minnesota Super Bowl Host Committee presented Super Bowl Live on Nicollet Mall in downtown Minneapolis.[48] This ten-day free[5] festival and concert series featured Sheila E., The Revolution, Morris Day and The Time, and The New Power Generation, musicians from Minnesota who collaborated with Prince, a Minneapolis native. Produced by Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis, Super Bowl Live also included performances by Idina Menzel, Soul Asylum, the Suburbs, Bob Mould, Sounds of Blackness, Dessa, VocalEssence, Mint Condition, and the Jets.[49] In addition to the concert series, Super Bowl Live featured a 200-foot (61 m) American Birkebeiner International Bridge on Nicollet Mall to showcase cross-country skiing, skijoring, fat-tire bicycle racing,[5] and snow tubing demonstrations.[50] There was also a snowmobile stunt show on February 3.[5]

The NFL presented the Super Bowl Experience at the Minneapolis Convention Center[48][39][51] from January 27 to February 3 with an entrance fee.[5]Kelly Clarkson performed at the Minneapolis Armory and a U.S. Bank Stadium lounge on the day of the Super Bowl.[52]

The Minneapolis Armory also hosted Jennifer Lopez, Imagine Dragons, and Pink concerts close to U.S. Bank Stadium.[53][54][55][56] Pink also performed the national anthem before the Super Bowl.[57] Halftime performer Justin Timberlake held a ticketed "listening session" of his newest album at Prince's Paisley Park.[58]Dave Matthews Band performed at Xcel Energy Center in Saint Paul.[54] The Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community's Mystic Lake Casino hosted Gwen Stefani,[59]the Chainsmokers, Florida Georgia Line, and Kygo.[60] Planners originally scheduled a 64,000-square-foot (5,900 m2) traveling nightclub for 9500 people,[61][54] but cancelled, moving its concerts into the main casino.[60]Ellie Goulding's appearance with Kygo was cancelled at the same time.[62] The Mystic Lake Casino in Prior Lake, Minnesota, has the second-largest hotel in the Twin Cities metropolitan area, and Prior Lake hosted Super Bowl-week events including winter activities, a hotdish competition, and fundraisers.[59]

Other events were held at the Mall of America (including Radio Row as a home for national shows[63][64]), Saint Paul's RiverCentre[6] and Xcel Energy Center,[65] the Minnesota Vikings' Winter Park location in Eden Prairie, and the University of Minnesota.[66] "Taste of the NFL" is a fundraiser for food banks and was held in Saint Paul.[67] Minneapolis also offered a temporary zip-line across the Mississippi River near downtown.[68] The Luminary Loppet around Lake of the Isles in Minneapolis featured fire dancing, an ice pyramid, and luminary candles at night.[5]

The 2018 Saint Paul Winter Carnival took place leading up to, during and after the Super Bowl.[69] Carnival organizers built a large ice palace to coincide with the Super Bowl festivities, as with Super Bowl XXVI in 1992.[70] The ice palace was planned,[71][72] cancelled for lack of funds,[73] then re-announced with sponsors.[70] Events in Saint Paul also included an extreme sports demonstration, a "giant slide", and a block party. Officials in the capital city hoped to attract Minneapolis Super Bowl visitors.[74] The Minneapolis Institute of Art had a free 20-by-40-foot (6.1 m × 12.2 m), 6-foot-tall (1.8 m) ice maze.[75]

The Great Northern was a winter festival in the Twin Cities from January 25 to February 4 that included the U.S. Pond Hockey Championships, an ice bar,[76] and an "urban ski competition".[77]

ESPN broadcast its studio programming from the IDS Center in downtown Minneapolis,[78] while Golf Channel (a sister network of Super Bowl LII broadcaster NBC) aired two live episodes of David Feherty's eponymous interview show from the State Theatre.[79]

Native American communities of Minnesota performed nightly drum ceremonies.[64] Various drumlines from around the state performed at different locations throughout the day.[80][81]

Marketing

The slogan Bold North was developed by the Minnesota Super Bowl Host Committee to promote Super Bowl LII and its surrounding festivities. The slogan was intended to represent an embrace of the region's climate as part of its identity, and was used on merchandise and by the host committee's official sponsors. The NFL unveiled the official logo for Super Bowl LII (a cerulean-colored version of a standardized design) prior to Super Bowl LI, and the official branding elements and secondary logo in October 2017—featuring blue and purple aurora motifs.[82][83][84]

Broadcasting

United States

NBC broadcast Super Bowl LII, as part of an annual cycle between the three main broadcast television partners of the NFL.[85] NBC's lead NFL team of play-by-play man Al Michaels and color analyst Cris Collinsworth called the game. Sister cable network Universo carried a full Spanish language broadcast produced by Telemundo Deportes, with Edgar Lopez and Rene Giraldo. The Universo Spanish audio was also available on NBC through the SAP channel, where available.[86][87] NBC employed 73 cameras within the stadium, and introduced "volumetric-AR" graphics featuring 3D body scanning of players,[88][89] and a new on-air graphics package to be used exclusively for Sunday Night Football going forward.[90]

This was the last game in Westwood One's national radio contract with the NFL before a quiet renewal on undermined terms after the season and Cumulus exited a chapter 11 bankruptcy filing made just before the Super Bowl.[91] Each participating team's flagship station (the Patriots Radio Network's WBZ-FM/Boston, and the Eagles Radio Network's WIP-FM/Philadelphia, along with WEMG/Camden, New Jersey for Spanish play-by-play) carried the game with local announcers. (For the second consecutive year, none of the local flagships are clear-channel stations, and thus the local commentators were only audible for free within each respective team's immediate metropolitan area; listeners who live outside the flagship stations' broadcast ranges were required to subscribe to Sirius XM Radio or TuneIn Premium to access the local broadcasts.) Under the terms of the Westwood One contract, any radio station that is not a local flagship, if it is to carry the game, is required to utilize the Westwood One feed. It was the first title win called by Eagles play-by-play announcer Merrill Reese, who has been the primary radio voice of the team since 1977.[92]

Online streams of the game were provided by NBC. It was available on NBCSports.com, the NBC Sports app for mobile devices, tablets, connected-TV devices, and NBC.com without any required login. The Spanish-language broadcast was available on the Telemundo Deportes En Vivo app and TelemundoDeportes.com for desktop devices, connected TV devices, and tablets but not mobile devices.[93] Under new digital rights deals that began with the 2017–18 playoffs, Verizon still offers mobile streaming of games, but no longer holds exclusive rights to stream NFL games on smartphones or make them exclusive to Verizon Wireless subscribers. Instead, Verizon elected to use the deal to bolster its recent acquisition of Yahoo!; on January 9, 2018, Verizon announced that it would host streams of playoff games through the Yahoo! Sports and go90 app, including Super Bowl LII. As a result of the deal, the online stream was available to viewers on all Internet devices for the first time, regardless of network (because of Verizon's previous exclusive rights deal, non-Verizon phones had previously been blocked from receiving any NFL telecasts, regardless of source).[94][95] The game was also available through the NFL Mobile app with the aforementioned change to viewing through the app now being allowed on all mobile carriers.[96]

Dan Patrick and Liam McHugh served as the lead hosts for NBC's pre-game coverage.[97]Mike Tirico, who replaced the retiring Bob Costas in 2017 as NBC's lead studio host for both the NFL and the Olympic Games, did not participate in coverage of Super Bowl LII due to his commitments to the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea (which opened on the Friday following the game).[98]

As NBC Sports Regional Networks operates regional sports networks in the markets of both teams which participated, the NBC Sports Boston and NBC Sports Philadelphia channels were used to provide additional coverage of the game from a local perspective. Both networks aired coverage from Minneapolis, including specials focusing on their respective teams, and a jointly-produced pre-game show aired by both channels.[99]

Nielsen reported a 47.4/70% overnight rating in metered markets, peaking at 52.2/74 during the fourth quarter. These numbers are about 3% lower than early numbers from Super Bowl LI, and the lowest since Super Bowl XLIV in 2010.[100]

Advertising

Dan Lovinger, NBC Sports Group executive vice president of ad sales, stated to Variety in July 2017 that the network was seeking a price "north of  million" (the price set for the previous two Super Bowls) for a 30-second commercial during Super Bowl LII.[101][102] As they began five days after the Super Bowl, NBC offered advertising packages that covered both Super Bowl LII and the 2018 Winter Olympics (which marked the first time since 1992 that a single broadcast network had aired both the Super Bowl and Winter Olympics in the same year); the network estimated that it would bring in at least

 billion in advertising revenue from the two events.[103][85] During the second quarter, an equipment failure caused NBC's broadcast to experience dead air for 30 seconds during a commercial break. No actual commercial time was lost.[104][105]

Advertisements for Tide detergent featuring David Harbour of Stranger Things created a recurring theme, appearing in each quarter, often disguised as well-known commercials for other products, with Harbour eventually declaring "It's a Tide ad."[106]Anheuser-Busch has, as it has done in previous Super Bowls, purchased multiple commercials in the game, advertising Bud Light, Stella Artois and Michelob Ultra. For the first time since Super Bowl VIII, the company reduced the appearances of the Budweiser Clydesdales in a Super Bowl commercial, with the 60-second Budweiser commercial for this event instead focusing on a Budweiser factory plant in Georgia distributing water, referencing the beer maker's efforts to distribute water to families of victims affected by natural disasters, such as wildfires and hurricanes. However, a Clydesdale was featured in a commercial for Tide detergent and the Budweiser Clydesdales only appeared in a five-second Budweiser commercial to remind viewers of the "ClydesdaleCam" livestream event.[107] Other signed advertisers included The Coca-Cola Company and Avocados from Mexico.[102] Cellphone carrier T-Mobile aired a minute long ad with actress Kerry Washington narrating, featuring babies of various ethnic backgrounds. The commercial also features Nirvana's song "All Apologies" played as a lullaby. In the ad, Washington talks about the babies being born with natural instincts of love and not racism calling them "unstoppable" and that they will demand fair and equal pay. T-Mobile CEO John Legere posted to his Twitter account afterwards saying, "This year, we wanted to use our #SuperBowl airtime to share that @TMobile believes we all started in the same place. We are more alike than different. And we are unstoppable."[108]

Fiat Chrysler subsidiary Ram Trucks was met with criticism over its ad "Built to Serve", which featured an excerpt from Martin Luther King Jr.'s "Drum Major Instinct" sermon on the virtues of serving others (February 4, 2018 was also the 50th anniversary of the sermon). The ad was considered an exploitation of King's words to sell a product, with media outlets noting that the sermon in the ad went on to specifically criticize advertisers (including automobile manufacturers) for being "gentlemen of massive verbal persuasion".[109][110][111]

Lead-out programs

NBC's lead-out program was an episode of This Is Us, titled "Super Bowl Sunday",[112] alongside a special episode of The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon from Minneapolis' Orpheum Theatre, with halftime performer Justin Timberlake, Dwayne Johnson, Chris Stapleton and the cast of This Is Us as guests.[113][114]

In a surprise move, Netflix used its advertising time to announce that The Cloverfield Paradox — the third film in the Cloverfield series — would be available for streaming on the service immediately after the game, potentially undercutting viewership of the lucrative post-game slot on NBC.[115]

International broadcasts

Rights holder(s)
 Australia The event aired live on the Seven Network and 7mate[116]
 Brazil The Super Bowl was shown live by ESPN Brasil, with Paulo Antunes and Everaldo Marques as the announcers for the evening. It was also shown live on Cinemark, Cinépolis, Kinoplex[contradictory] and UCI movie theaters across the country.
 Canada Bell Media holds broadcast rights for local stations in Canada and aired the game across its networks on CTV, CTV Two, RDS (for French), TSN Radio and TSN2; TSN's regional networks did not carry the game due to a scheduling conflict with the 2018 Scotties Tournament of Hearts, the national women's curling championship. Due to the game being exempt from the CRTC's simultaneous substitution regulations for the second year in a row, Bell reprised the previous year's usage of a sweepstakes and entertainment features to retain Canadian audiences.[117][118]

On RDS, the announcer was David Arsenault with Pierre Vercheval as analyst and Didier Orméjuste on the sidelines.

 France beIn Sports2 and W9 broadcast the event.
 Germany ProSieben broadcast the Super Bowl for the first time, after it had previously been on sister channel Sat.1 since Super Bowl XLVI. It was shown for no additional cost in standard-definition and on ProSieben HD in high-definition on HD as well as multiple cable and IPTV providers. It was also available on internet streaming service DAZN for no cost in addition to the regular subscription fee.[119]
 India Sony SIX[120]
 Philippines The 5 Network broadcast the event in the Philippines.
 United Kingdom As per recent years, Super Bowl LII aired live on BBC One for no additional cost over the licence fee. It was also available on Sky Sports.[citation needed] In a change to tradition, the BBC chose to use NBC's feed instead of the NFL Films and NFL Network produced World Feed.[121]
United States U.S. military bases American Forces Network carried the Super Bowl live to members of the United States Armed Forces in Eurasia.[122]

Entertainment

Pre-game

The inside of the stadium on game day

Pink performed "The Star-Spangled Banner",[57] while Leslie Odom Jr. sang "America the Beautiful".[123][124] Pink spit out a throat lozenge shortly before singing the anthem, later verified after many commentators thought she had spit out a piece of gum.[125] She reported being ill with flu symptoms during her performance.[126] No players were observed kneeling during the national anthem, in contrast to the protests that happened earlier in the 2016 and 2017 seasons.[127]

Fifteen Medal of Honor recipients participated in the coin toss ceremony.[128][129]World War II hero Hershel W. Williams was the honorary captain and had the honors of flipping the coin.[130]

Halftime show

Main article: Super Bowl LII halftime show
Justin Timberlake performs on piano alongside projected archive footage of Prince during the Super Bowl LII halftime show.

Justin Timberlake headlined the Super Bowl LII halftime show, along with his band "The Tennessee Kids" and featuring the University of Minnesota Marching Band.[131][132][133] Timberlake performed in two previous Super Bowls: Super Bowl XXXV in 2001 as a member of NSYNC, and Super Bowl XXXVIII in 2004 with Janet Jackson.[134][135]

Timberlake's performance drew criticism for not being "spectacular", looking to be safe and avoid incidents such as the infamous "wardrobe malfunction" encountered during his performance with Jackson, and for incorporating a video of Prince, who opposed performances combining the dead and the living.[136][137]

Game summary

First half

A Philadelphia Eagles handoff during the first quarter.

The New England Patriots won the opening coin toss and elected to defer to the second half. The Patriots kicked off to the Eagles, who opened the game with a 14-play, 67-yard drive that took 7:05 off the clock and resulted in a 25-yard Jake Elliott field goal, giving the Eagles a 3–0 lead. The drive was controlled by the arm of Eagles quarterback Nick Foles, who completed 6 of 9 passes to five different receivers for 61 yards, with a few short runs by LeGarrette Blount and Jay Ajayi mixed in. Foles also made two critical completions on third down plays, hitting Alshon Jeffery for a 17-yard gain on third-and-4, and later found Torrey Smith for a 15-yard completion on third-and-12. The Patriots responded with a drive of their own, almost with exactly the same results; quarterback Tom Brady completed 6 of 8 passes for 60 yards to four different receivers, the longest a 28-yard strike to Chris Hogan. The drive stalled out on the Eagles 8-yard line, where they had to settle for Stephen Gostkowski's 26-yard field goal, which tied the game at 3–3. The game's first touchdown was scored by the Eagles on the next drive, taking only three plays: a short pass from Foles to Nelson Agholor, a 36-yard run up the middle by Blount, and a 34-yard touchdown pass from Foles to Jeffery to the left side of the field. The ensuing extra point attempt from Elliott was missed wide right, which made the score 9–3 in favor of the Eagles. The Patriots responded by advancing the ball to the Philadelphia 11-yard line on their next drive, which was set up by a 50-yard completion from Brady to Danny Amendola, where the quarter ended.[138]

With the second quarter under way, the Patriots came away empty-handed on the drive, as Gostkowski missed a 26-yard field goal attempt after holder Ryan Allen mishandled the snap.[139] New England's defense forced the game's only punt on the next drive. On the following drive, Brady completed a 23-yard pass to Brandin Cooks, but a hard hit by defender Malcolm Jenkins knocked the receiver out of the game with a concussion. On third down from near mid-field, the Patriots attempted a trick play that involved two handoffs and a pass downfield to Tom Brady. Brady was open, but dropped the throw from Amendola. They went for it on fourth down, and a pass intended for tight end Rob Gronkowski fell incomplete, giving the Eagles the ball on their own 35-yard line on a turnover-on-downs. The Eagles capitalized on a drive featuring two key completions, a 19-yard catch by Zach Ertz on third-and-7, and a 22-yard reception by Jeffery on the Patriots 21-yard line. On the next play, a 21-yard rumble by Blount gave the Eagles another touchdown. They attempted a two-point conversion, which failed, making the score 15–3. The Patriots quickly struck back, as Brady completed a 46-yard pass to Rex Burkhead on the first play after the kickoff. But the team could only gain two more yards, resulting in Gostkowski's 45-yard field goal that got the score to 15–6.[140]

The Eagles got the ball back with 7:24 on the clock and looked poised to score another touchdown after a 26-yard run by Ajayi gave them a first down on the Patriots 43-yard line. But on the next play, Foles threw a pass that bounced off Jeffery as he tried to make a one-handed catch, and went into the hands of Patriots safety Duron Harmon for an interception, which he returned eight yards to the 10-yard line. The Patriots took advantage of the turnover with a seven-play, 90-yard drive, featuring a 43-yard completion from Brady to Hogan. On the next play, James White scored with a 26-yard touchdown run. Gostkowski missed the ensuing extra point, but the score was now 15–12. Eagles running back Kenjon Barner returned the ensuing kickoff 27 yards to his own 30-yard line as time ran down to the two-minute warning. Two plays later, on third-and-3, Foles completed a short pass to running back Corey Clement, who took off for a 55-yard gain to the New England 8-yard line. Clement then ran the ball six yards to the two-yard line on the next play. Two plays later, Philadelphia faced fourth-and-goal on the 1-yard line with 38 seconds left on the clock. Deciding to go for the touchdown, they attempted a similar trick play to the one that had failed for the Patriots earlier, in what would become the most memorable play of the game. As Foles stepped up to the running back position, Clement took a direct snap and pitched the ball to tight end Trey Burton, who then threw the ball perfectly to Foles, who was wide open in the right side of the end zone. Foles caught the ball, making him the first quarterback ever to catch a touchdown pass in a Super Bowl, and the ensuing extra point was good, giving the Eagles a 22–12 lead, which was taken into the locker room after a short drive by the Patriots. The play came to be known as the Philly Special.[138]

The first half resulted in numerous Super Bowl records from both teams, including most total yards combined (673). This was also the first time two quarterbacks had thrown for over 200 yards in the first half of a Super Bowl, with Brady throwing for 276 yards and Foles 215.[141]

Second half

The Patriots received the second-half kickoff and Brady led New England 75 yards in eight plays. Gronkowski, who caught only one pass for nine yards in the first half, caught five passes for 68 yards on the drive, the last a 5-yard touchdown reception to make the score 22–19. The Eagles responded by moving the ball 85 yards in 11 plays on a drive that consumed less than five minutes and featured three critical third-down conversions by Foles. The first was a 17-yard pass to Agholor on third-and-6 from the Eagles 19-yard line. Later in the drive, he threw a 14-yard completion to Ertz on third-and-1 from the New England 40-yard line. Finally, he finished the possession with a 22-yard touchdown pass to Clement on third-and-6. The touchdown was upheld upon replay review, as officials confirmed that Clement kept both feet inbounds and controlled the ball. An Elliott extra point brought the score to 29–19 in the Eagles' favor. Brady responded with a 10-play, 75-yard drive, completing all three of his passes for 61 yards, the last one a 26-yard touchdown pass to Hogan that brought the score to 29–26. The Eagles followed with an 8-play, 51-yard drive featuring a 24-yard completion from Foles to Agholor on the first play. By the end of the third quarter, the team had made it to the New England 16-yard line.

The Eagles opened the fourth quarter scoring with a Jake Elliott field goal to bring the score to 32–26. Brady then came back with another 75-yard drive featuring a 30-yard reception by Amendola and ending with a four-yard pass to Gronkowski, his second touchdown of the game, giving the Patriots their first lead of the game with the score at 33–32. On their next drive, the Eagles faced third-and-6 after two plays, but were able to keep the ball with a 7-yard catch by Ertz. Eventually they faced a fourth-and-1 on their own 45-yard line with 5:39 left in the game. Deciding to go for the conversion rather than punt, Foles completed a 2-yard pass to Ertz that kept the drive alive. Then after a 1-yard Blount run, Foles picked up three consecutive first downs with three passes to Agholor for gains of 10, 18, and 10 yards, respectively, moving the ball to the New England 14-yard line. Following a 3-yard run by Ajayi, Foles threw a 9-yard touchdown pass to Ertz with 2:21 remaining in the game. The play was held up on review; Ertz lost the ball after touching the ground in the end zone, but it was determined that he established himself as a runner and maintained control of the ball as he broke the plane of the goal line. A failed two-point conversion left the Eagles with a 38–33 lead.

On the Patriots' next drive, Eagles defensive end Brandon Graham stripped the ball from Brady on the drive's second play for the game's only sack. Eagles rookie defensive end Derek Barnett recovered the ball, allowing the Eagles to run the clock down to 1:05 and force New England to use all their remaining timeouts. Elliott then kicked a 46-yard field goal, putting Philadelphia ahead by eight points, 41–33. New England needed a touchdown and two-point conversion to tie the game and send it into overtime. After nine plays (one of them a 13-yard catch by Amendola on fourth-and-10), Brady reached the 49-yard line, and with only nine seconds remaining, he threw a Hail Mary pass to the end zone as time expired. The pass was incomplete, and the Eagles won their first Vince Lombardi Trophy in franchise history,[138] and their first league championship since 1960, ending the third-longest active championship drought in the NFL at 57 years. The Philadelphia Eagles became just the second team to win a Super Bowl rematch after losing the first Super Bowl meeting (having lost to New England in Super Bowl XXXIX), and the first since the Washington Redskins defeated the Miami Dolphins in Super Bowl XVII (the Miami Dolphins defeated the Washington Redskins in Super Bowl VII). The Eagles also became the first Super Bowl champions since the 1978 Pittsburgh Steelers to defeat both Super Bowl participants from the previous year in the same postseason.

Game statistics

The trophy presentation after the game

The combined 74 points scored was one point shy of the Super Bowl record of 75, set in Super Bowl XXIX in 1995; it and this game marked only the second time in the game's history where the teams combined for 70 points.[142] The game also set a record for most yardage by both teams (combined) with 1,151 yards, the most for any single game, regular season or postseason.[8] The game set many other Super Bowl records as well, including fewest punts from both teams (one), most yards gained by a team (613 for New England) and most points scored by a losing team (33).[8]

Nick Foles completed 28 of 43 passes for 373 yards and three touchdowns, with one interception, and caught a touchdown pass. Clement, who caught only 10 passes for 123 yards and two touchdowns during the season, was the Eagles' leading receiver with four receptions for 100 yards and a touchdown, while also rushing for eight yards. Agholor had nine receptions for 84 yards. Blount was the game's top rusher with 90 yards and a touchdown. Brady completed 28 of 48 passes for 505 yards and three touchdowns, breaking the record for most passing yards in a Super Bowl that he had set in the previous season. Amendola was his top target, with eight receptions for 152 yards, while Hogan had six for 128 yards and a touchdown and Gronkowski caught nine for 116 yards and two scores.[143]

Box score

Philadelphia Eagles vs. New England Patriots – Game summary
1 2 34Total
Eagles (NFC) 9 13 71241
Patriots (AFC) 3 9 14733

at U.S. Bank Stadium, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • Date: February 4, 2018
  • Game time: 5:31 p.m. CST
  • Game weather: Played indoors (domed stadium)
  • Game attendance: 67,612[144][145]
  • Referee: Gene Steratore
  • TV announcers (NBC): Al Michaels, Cris Collinsworth, Michele Tafoya
  • Recap, Game Book
Scoring summary
Quarter Time Drive Team Scoring information Score
Plays Yards TOP PHI NE
1 7:55 14 67 7:05 PHI 25-yard field goal by Jake Elliott 3 0
1 4:17 9 67 3:38 NE 26-yard field goal by Stephen Gostkowski 3 3
1 2:34 3 77 1:43 PHI Alshon Jeffery 34-yard touchdown reception from Nick Foles, Elliott kick no good (wide right) 9 3
2 8:48 6 65 3:05 PHI LeGarrette Blount 21-yard touchdown run, 2-point pass no good 15 3
2 7:24 5 48 1:24 NE 45-yard field goal by Gostkowski 15 6
2 2:04 7 90 2:57 NE James White 26-yard touchdown run, Gostkowski kick no good (wide left) 15 12
2 0:34 7 70 1:30 PHI Foles 1-yard touchdown reception from Trey Burton, Elliott kick good 22 12
3 12:15 8 75 2:45 NE Rob Gronkowski 5-yard touchdown reception from Tom Brady, Gostkowski kick good 22 19
3 7:18 11 85 4:57 PHI Corey Clement 22-yard touchdown reception from Foles, Elliott kick good 29 19
3 3:23 7 75 3:55 NE Chris Hogan 26-yard touchdown reception from Brady, Gostkowski kick good 29 26
4 14:09 8 51 4:14 PHI 42-yard field goal by Elliott 32 26
4 9:22 10 75 4:47 NE Gronkowski 4-yard touchdown reception from Brady, Gostkowski kick good 32 33
4 2:21 14 75 7:01 PHI Zach Ertz 11-yard touchdown reception from Foles, 2-point pass no good 38 33
4 1:05 4 4 1:04 PHI 46-yard field goal by Elliott 41 33
"TOP" = time of possession. For other American football terms, see Glossary of American football. 41 33

Final statistics

Statistical comparison

Statistic Philadelphia Eagles New England Patriots
First downs 25 29
First downs rushing 6 4
First downs passing 19 23
First downs penalty 0 2
Third down efficiency 10/16 5/10
Fourth down efficiency 2/2 1/2
Total net yards 538 613
Net yards rushing 164 113
Rushing attempts 27 22
Yards per rush 6.1 5.1
Net yards passing 374 500
Passing–completions/attempts 29/44 28/49
Times sacked–total yards 0–0 1–5
Interceptions thrown 1 0
Punt returns–total yards 0–0 0–0
Kickoff returns–total yards 4–98 3–44
Interceptions–total return yards 0–0 1–8
Punts–average yardage 1–41 0–0
Fumbles–lost 0–0 1–1
Penalties–yards 6–35 1–5
Time of possession 34:04 25:56
Turnovers 1 1
  • The lone Eagles punt was received with a fair catch.
Records set
(Unless otherwise noted, all records were only Super Bowl records)
Most yards allowed 613 Philadelphia Eagles
Most yards allowed in a win 613
Most Super Bowl appearances, as team 10 New England Patriots
Most points scored in a Super Bowl, losing team 33
Most total yards, team (game) 613
Most passing yards, team (postseason game) 500
Fewest punts, team (game) 0
Most players, 100 or more receiving yards 3 (Amendola 152, Hogan 128, Gronkowski 116)
Most Super Bowl appearances, as player 8 Tom Brady (New England)
Most Super Bowl appearances, as starting player 8
Most pass attempts, player (career) 357
Most pass completions, player (career) 235
Most passing yards, player (any postseason game) 505
Most passing yards, player (career) 2,576
Most touchdown passes, player (career) 18
Oldest quarterback, as player 40 years 185 days
Oldest quarterback, as starting player 40 years 185 days
Most Super Bowl appearances, as head coach 8 Bill Belichick (New England)
Most Super Bowl appearances, as coach 11
Most Super Bowl appearances, in any capacity 11
Most TD receptions, as quarterback (game) 1 Nick Foles (Philadelphia)
Most TD receptions, as quarterback (career) 1
Most Super Bowl games with TD pass and TD reception 1
Longest field goal kicked by a rookie 46 yards Jake Elliott (Philadelphia)
Most receiving yards, game, tight end 116 Rob Gronkowski (New England)
Most total yards, both teams (any NFL game) 1,151 Philadelphia Eagles vs. New England Patriots
Most first downs passing, both teams (game) 42
Most passing yards, both teams (any postseason game) 874
Most missed PAT attempts, both teams (game) 4
Fewest punts, both teams (game) 1
Records tied
Fewest times sacked, as team (game) 0 Philadelphia Eagles
Fewest fumbles, as team (game) 0
Fewest fumbles lost, as team (game) 0
Fewest punt returns, as team (game) 0
Most missed PAT attempts, as team (game) 3
Most Super Bowl losses, as team 5 New England Patriots
Fewest punt returns, as team (game) 0
Most Super Bowl appearances, as kicker 5 Stephen Gostkowski (New England)
Most pass attempts with no interceptions (game) 48 Tom Brady (New England)
Most field goals, both teams (game) 5 Philadelphia Eagles vs. New England Patriots
Most first downs, both teams (game) 54
Most pass attempts, both teams (game) 93
Most touchdown passes, both teams (game) 7
Fewest times sacked, both teams (game) 1
Fewest punt returns, both teams (game) 0
Fewest punt return yards, both teams (game) 0

Individual statistics

Eagles passing
C/ATT1 Yds TD INT Rating
Nick Foles 28/43 373 3 1 106.1
Trey Burton 1/1 1 1 0 118.8
Eagles rushing
Car2 Yds TD LG3 Yds/Car
LeGarrette Blount 14 90 1 36 6.4
Jay Ajayi 9 57 0 26 6.3
Nelson Agholor 1 9 0 9 9.0
Corey Clement 3 8 0 6 2.7
Eagles receiving
Rec4 Yds TD LG3 Target5
Nelson Agholor 9 84 0 24 11
Zach Ertz 7 67 1 19 9
Torrey Smith 5 49 0 17 9
Corey Clement 4 100 1 55 5
Alshon Jeffery 3 73 1 34 8
Nick Foles 1 1 1 1 1
Trey Burton 0 0 0 0 1
Patriots passing
C/ATT1 Yds TD INT Rating
Tom Brady 28/48 505 3 0 115.4
Danny Amendola 0/1 0 0 0 39.6
Patriots rushing
Car2 Yds TD LG3 Yds/Car
James White 7 45 1 26 6.4
Dion Lewis 9 39 0 8 4.3
Rex Burkhead 3 18 0 9 6.0
Tom Brady 1 6 0 6 6.0
Chris Hogan 1 4 0 4 4.0
Brandin Cooks 1 1 0 1 1.0
Patriots receiving
Rec4 Yds TD LG3 Target5
Rob Gronkowski 9 116 2 25 15
Danny Amendola 8 152 0 50 11
Chris Hogan 6 128 1 43 8
James White 2 21 0 15 6
Rex Burkhead 1 46 0 46 1
Brandin Cooks 1 23 0 23 2
Phillip Dorsett 1 19 0 19 2
Tom Brady 0 0 0 0 1
James Develin 0 0 0 0 1

1Completions/attempts
2Carries
3Long gain
4Receptions
5Times targeted

Starting lineups

Source:[145]

Philadelphia Position Position New England
Offense
Alshon Jeffery WR Brandin Cooks
Halapoulivaati Vaitai LT Nate Solder
Stefen Wisniewski LG Joe Thuney
Jason Kelce C David Andrews
Brandon Brooks RG Shaq Mason
Lane Johnson RT Cameron Fleming
Zach Ertz TE Rob Gronkowski
Nelson Agholor WR Chris Hogan
Nick Foles QB Tom Brady
LeGarrette Blount RB Dion Lewis
Torrey Smith WR FB James Develin
Defense
Vinny Curry DE LE Trey Flowers
Timmy Jernigan DT Lawrence Guy
Fletcher Cox DT Malcom Brown
Brandon Graham DE LB James Harrison
Mychal Kendricks OLB LB Kyle Van Noy
Nigel Bradham OLB LB Elandon Roberts
Jalen Mills CB RCB Stephon Gilmore
Ronald Darby CB LCB Eric Rowe
Corey Graham S Patrick Chung
Rodney McLeod S Devin McCourty
Malcolm Jenkins S Duron Harmon

Officials

Super Bowl LII had seven officials.[146] The numbers in parentheses below indicate their uniform numbers.

  • Referee: Gene Steratore (114)
  • Umpire: Roy Ellison (81)
  • Down judge: Jerry Bergman (91)
  • Line judge: Byron Boston (18)
  • Field judge: Tom Hill (97)
  • Side judge: Scott Edwards (3)
  • Back judge: Perry Paganelli (46)
  • Replay official: Paul Weidner
  • Alternate Referee: Craig Wrolstad (4)
  • Alternate Umpire: Ruben Fowler (71)
  • Alternate Wing: Ed Camp (134)
  • Alternate Deep: Jimmy Buchanan (86)
  • Alternate Back Judge: Greg Steed (12)

This was Steratore's first—and eventually only—Super Bowl as a referee, though he had been previously selected as an alternate for Super Bowl XLIV.[147] Steratore retired from officiating after 15 seasons on June 22, 2018, and joined CBS Sports as a rule analyst starting with the 2018 season.[148]

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External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Super Bowl LII.
video iconExternal video Super Bowl 52 FULL Game: New England Patriots vs. Philadelphia Eagles on YouTube
  • Minnesota Super Bowl Host Committee
Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Super_Bowl_LII&oldid=1060948763"
Review: The Super Bowl XLV Halftime Show super sucked ...

08-02-2011 · Review: The Super Bowl XLV Halftime Show super sucked. It would seem after the now legendary 2004 Janet Jackson Superbowl halftime show where the performer accidentally flashed everyone for 2.2 seconds in a blink and you miss it moment, that in addition to banning MTV from planning the entertainment, those in charge also sought to punish viewers in the last few years with …

08-02-2011

It would seem after the now legendary 2004 Janet Jackson Superbowl halftime show where the performer accidentally flashed everyone for 2.2 seconds in a blink and you miss it moment, that in addition to banning MTV from planning the entertainment, those in charge also sought to punish viewers in the last few years with mediocre and boring performances from legendary, yet dated performers who lacked the energy required to carry such a show and all of which were forgettable.


This year the producers found a seemingly perfect solution, the super popular, non-controversial, all around likable, and family friendly Black Eyed Peas. This also marked the first time a woman was allowed to perform on stage since Ms.Jackson, because you know all women had to be punished for the accidental indecency of one. So how did this show fare with a relatable young pop band? It was a convoluted mess.

The show set Twitter ablaze. It was a spectacle from beginning to end. I will break down my review by song performed.

“I Gotta Feeling”

This song was the opener and from the beginning it was clear that the performance was going to be full of sound issues. BEP did sing live, which is commendable, but does nothing for a performance when the live singing and sound system is atrocious. They had broken vocals every few minutes. Visually the performance included a mass of dancers in all white jumping around to the beat with flashing lights on the stage, field, and the bodies of the dancers and members of BEP.

It was all very strange; the dancers seemed like an audience more than part of the performance. BEP is on stage in a line only moving when they change lead vocals but otherwise were very low energy.

“Boom Boom Pow”

The dancers are now lit up in a string of green lights on their white jump suits and they are in huddled masses that sometimes form arrows for no reason. This portion appealed to all the viewers who decided to drop acid before the game started, but no one else. The BEP is still on stage barely moving and performing the lyrics with low energy as if they are bored. Fergie is trying her hardest to prove she can sing and accentuating vocals to the point she is almost screaming or doing her best Christina Aguilera impression.

“Sweet Child of Mine”

This was the most confusing and unnecessary moment of the entire performance. The BEP transition into Sweet Child of Mine, Slash gets raised onto the stage and Fergie belts out a few lines of the song while the other members of BEP are standing around awkwardly. I have said this before, but Slash in the past few years seems to be a favorite guest performer and will play a guitar riff on stage with anyone for a paycheck.

Apparently, Fergie will be collaborating with him on his new album, so perhaps this was a marketing ploy to get the BEP fan base thinking about buying the future record. Fergie also decided to dance as if she was an avatar in Guitar Hero next to Slash for some reason. Perhaps there will soon be a BEP Guitar Hero edition, too?

“Pump It/Let’s Get it Started”

After standing around the guys of BEP seem to have a little more energy but once Fergie comes back into the shot, they resume their linear position on stage and kind of sway around to the beat. They also decided to bring out some marching band members for this number, so guys are randomly playing trumpets and dancing behind them in white hooded sweatshirts, which seemed more like a scene from the movie Drumline than appropriate for the crazy futuristic LED stage/Tron dancer mash-up that seemed to be the theme for the show.

“OMG”

Usher had no reason to be a surprise guest, he was unimpressive and out of place. This was clearly an attempt at shock, yet because of Usher’s multiple failed comebacks; he really has not been truly relevant since his 2004 “Confessions” album. The fact that he has two radio hits this year does not make him worthy of a Superbowl performance and his 30 seconds on stage could have been better utilized. Yes, Usher can dance he did great choreography including his cheerleader move where he was raised up by other dancers, but it was nothing new and out of place. Not impressed.

“Where is the Love?”

This was by far the worst portion of this performance. In terms of production, it was a horrible choice and badly placed after an upbeat song like OMG. Also the dancers in their lighted jumpsuits now glow red and form hearts all over the field and the word love. It was cheesy and contrived to say the least.

“Time of My Life/I Gotta Feeling”

The BEP should stop performing “Time of My Life” and release another single so that the world can forget about it. It is a horrible song that destroys a classic. At least they only did a few lines of the song before going back into “I Gotta Feeling” to end. The BEP brought out the box-headed theme from the music video and those dancers surround them on stage in the white jumpsuits again. The dancers on the field are all in symmetrical lines and here we have everyone, including BEP doing marching/skipping choreography all synchronized. This might have been the best part of the show and when the BEP finally started moving and exerting themselves. I suppose they wanted to save their energy for the end. They transitioned back into “I Gotta Feeling” and thankfully ended their performance

Although this performance in every definition of the word, sucked, I am happy to see risks being taken by allowing The Black Eyed Peas to perform. Hopefully in the years to come we will see better and more relevant artists perform the halftime show, more risks being taken, and more collaborative efforts like we used to when MTV produced the show. Either that or we will be doomed to never have good entertainment during the Superbowl ever again- one or the other.

What are your thoughts?

The Weeknd Receives Poor Reviews For Super Bowl Halftime ...

Feb. 8 2021, Updated 11:58 a.m. ET. Grammy-snubbed singer The Weeknd headlined the Super Bowl LV halftime show, but his lukewarm performance was not as exciting to fans as the game itself.

Grammy-snubbed singer The Weeknd headlined the Super Bowl LV halftime show, but his lukewarm performance was not as exciting to fans as the game itself. 

The singer, 30, performed his set in a sparkly red sport coat and spectator shoes, but it seemed as though his outfit was the only highlight of the much-anticipated show. 

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Watch clips from the performance below. 

— SportsCenter (@SportsCenter) February 8, 2021

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Throughout and following the performance, social media users were quick to comment on The Weeknd’s halftime show, and let's just say... the reviews were less than kind.

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The weeknd has good ass music but this half time show is ass. Nobody has had a good half time show since Katy perry

— John Lazar (@johnlazar7) February 8, 2021

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The Weeknd really got bangers but this performance is meh

— Lordeighth⚡️ (@theLordeighth) February 8, 2021

Another tweeted, “I swear I never liked The Weeknd. This performance didn’t change that one bit.”

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I swear I never liked The Weeknd. This performance didn’t change that one bit.

— SloppyJoseph (@TheGreatBamVINO) February 8, 2021

One simply said, "lol weeknd more like the weekday." 

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lol weeknd more like the weekday

— vedant (@legoworld16) February 8, 2021

Still, the singer’s full face was on display as he took Raymond James Stadium in Tampa, Fla., on Sunday, February 7, at the big game (though his backup dancers were completely masked, covering their faces in The Weeknd’s signature bandages).

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The Weeknd was the big entertainment for sport’s biggest night, which saw the Kansas City Chiefs face off against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.

After much speculation that The Weeknd got plastic surgery when his new "Save Your Tears" music video dropped earlier this year, the attention-grabbing musician revealed what his face actually looks like — and it seemed that his face transformation was just for attention. 

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As OK! previously reported, after he was snubbed by the 2021 Grammys, The Weeknd now thinks that his past wins "mean nothing" to him. 

"Look, I personally don't care anymore," he said.

"It's not like, 'Oh, I want the Grammy!'" he explained. "It's just that this happened, and I'm down to get in front of the fire, as long as it never happens again.

"I suck at giving speeches anyways. Forget awards shows."