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Chillicothe Sportsmen’s Club Gun Show. Chillicothe Sportsmen's Club. Chillicothe, IL. Dec 4th - 5th, 2021. Sat 8-3, Sun 8-2. Will County Gun Show. Will County Fairgrounds. Peotone, IL. Dec 4th - 5th, 2021.

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Apr 23rd, 2022

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CADA Gun Show

DuPage County Fairgrounds

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Sep 24th, 2022

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CADA Gun Show

DuPage County Fairgrounds

Illinois Gun Shows :: American Gun Owners Alliance

Show Name: St. Charles Gun Show. Dates: December 12, 2021 . Venue: Kane County Fairgrounds, 525 South Randall Road St.Charles IL 60174. Promoter: Kane County Sportsman's Show. Hours: Sun 7:30am - 1:30pm. more info >> Admission: .00. Latitude: 41.92201 Longitude:-88.30423

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Show Name: St. Charles Gun Show

Dates: January 9, 2022

Venue: Kane County Fairgrounds, 525 South Randall Road St.Charles IL 60174

Promoter: Kane County Sportsman's Show

Hours: Sun 7:30am - 1:30pm

more info >>Admission: .00

Latitude: 41.92201 Longitude: -88.30423

Show Name: Grayslake Gun Show

Dates: January 13, 2022 through January 16, 2022

Venue: Lake County Fairgrounds , 1060 East Peterson Rd Grayslake IL 60030

Promoter: Outdoor Sports Group

Hours: Thurs 12pm - 8pm, Fri 12pm - 8pm, Sat 10:00am - 8:00pm, Sun 10:00am - 5:00pm

more info >>Admission: contact promoter

Latitude: 42.34115 Longitude: -88.02488

Show Name: Woodstock Gun Show

Dates: January 16, 2022

Venue: McHenry County Fairgrounds, 11900 Country Club Rd Woodstock IL 60098

Promoter: D and J Guns

Hours: Sun 7:30am - 1:00pm

more info >>Admission: .00

Latitude: 42.32059 Longitude: -88.44762

Show Name: Princeton Gun Show

Dates: January 29, 2022 through January 30, 2022

Venue: Bureau County Fairgrounds, 811 W Peru Street Princeton IL 61356

Promoter: Sauk Trail Gun Collectors

Hours: Sat 8:00am - 4:00pm, Sun 8:00am - 4:00pm

more info >>Admission: contact promoter

Latitude: 41.37133 Longitude: -89.46351

Show Name: St. Charles Gun Show

Dates: February 13, 2022

Venue: Kane County Fairgrounds, 525 South Randall Road St.Charles IL 60174

Promoter: Kane County Sportsman's Show

Hours: Sun 7:30am - 1:30pm

more info >>Admission: .00

Latitude: 41.92201 Longitude: -88.30423

Show Name: Woodstock Gun Show

Dates: February 20, 2022

Venue: McHenry County Fairgrounds, 11900 Country Club Rd Woodstock IL 60098

Promoter: D and J Guns

Hours: Sun 7:30am - 1:00pm

more info >>Admission: .00

Latitude: 42.32059 Longitude: -88.44762

Show Name: St. Charles Gun Show

Dates: March 13, 2022

Venue: Kane County Fairgrounds, 525 South Randall Road St.Charles IL 60174

Promoter: Kane County Sportsman's Show

Hours: Sun 7:30am - 1:30pm

more info >>Admission: .00

Latitude: 41.92201 Longitude: -88.30423

Show Name: Woodstock Gun Show

Dates: March 20, 2022

Venue: McHenry County Fairgrounds, 11900 Country Club Rd Woodstock IL 60098

Promoter: D and J Guns

Hours: Sun 7:30am - 1:00pm

more info >>Admission: .00

Latitude: 42.32059 Longitude: -88.44762

Show Name: St. Charles Gun Show

Dates: April 10, 2022

Venue: Kane County Fairgrounds, 525 South Randall Road St.Charles IL 60174

Promoter: Kane County Sportsman's Show

Hours: Sun 7:30am - 1:30pm

more info >>Admission: .00

Latitude: 41.92201 Longitude: -88.30423

Show Name: Wheaton Gun Show

Dates: April 23, 2022

Venue: DuPage County Fairgrounds, 2015 Manchester Road Wheaton IL 60189

Promoter: Zurko Promotions

Hours: Sat 9:00am - 4:00pm

more info >>Admission: .00

Latitude: 41.83678 Longitude: -88.12889

Show Name: Woodstock Gun Show

Dates: April 23, 2022

Venue: McHenry County Fairgrounds, 11900 Country Club Rd Woodstock IL 60098

Promoter: D and J Guns

Hours: Sun 7:30am - 1:00pm

more info >>Admission: .00

Latitude: 42.32059 Longitude: -88.44762

Show Name: St. Charles Gun Show

Dates: May 15, 2022

Venue: Kane County Fairgrounds, 525 South Randall Road St.Charles IL 60174

Promoter: Kane County Sportsman's Show

Hours: Sun 7:30am - 1:30pm

more info >>Admission: .00

Latitude: 41.92201 Longitude: -88.30423

Show Name: Woodstock Gun Show

Dates: May 22, 2022

Venue: McHenry County Fairgrounds, 11900 Country Club Rd Woodstock IL 60098

Promoter: D and J Guns

Hours: Sun 7:30am - 1:00pm

more info >>Admission: .00

Latitude: 42.32059 Longitude: -88.44762

Show Name: Woodstock Gun Show

Dates: September 18, 2022

Venue: McHenry County Fairgrounds, 11900 Country Club Rd Woodstock IL 60098

Promoter: D and J Guns

Hours: Sun 7:30am - 1:00pm

more info >>Admission: .00

Latitude: 42.32059 Longitude: -88.44762

Show Name: Wheaton Gun Show

Dates: September 24, 2022

Venue: DuPage County Fairgrounds, 2015 Manchester Road Wheaton IL 60189

Promoter: Zurko Promotions

Hours: Sat 9:00am - 4:00pm

more info >>Admission: .00

Latitude: 41.83678 Longitude: -88.12889

Show Name: Woodstock Gun Show

Dates: October 15, 2022

Venue: McHenry County Fairgrounds, 11900 Country Club Rd Woodstock IL 60098

Promoter: D and J Guns

Hours: Sun 7:30am - 1:00pm

more info >>Admission: .00

Latitude: 42.32059 Longitude: -88.44762

Show Name: Woodstock Gun Show

Dates: November 20, 2022

Venue: McHenry County Fairgrounds, 11900 Country Club Rd Woodstock IL 60098

Promoter: D and J Guns

Hours: Sun 7:30am - 1:00pm

more info >>Admission: .00

Latitude: 42.32059 Longitude: -88.44762

Show Name: Woodstock Gun Show

Dates: December 18, 2022

Venue: McHenry County Fairgrounds, 11900 Country Club Rd Woodstock IL 60098

Promoter: D and J Guns

Hours: Sun 7:30am - 1:00pm

more info >>Admission: .00

Latitude: 42.32059 Longitude: -88.44762

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bcfairgrounds.net

Acquire your store-front. An 8′ table runs just , and grants you a sale platform for the course of the gun and knife show (Saturday 9-5, and Sunday 9-3). Make sure you make use of the set up time on Friday starting at 12:00 PM to 8PM and Saturday 7:00 AM to 9 AM. Vendors are responsible for tying firearms inoperable for the gun and knife ...

Headed to an Illinois Gun Show?  Don’t miss the largest Gun and Knife show around!

Making Purchases at an Illinois Gun Show

If you are planning on taking a trip to the LARGEST Illinois Gun Show, it is important to know what to expect for regulations and buying/selling requirements so you are prepared.  The following material offers chronological insight into the order of operation for purchase:

1.  Admission to the event is , tickets are purchased at the door and grant access to this well established Illinois Gun Show, chalk full of guns, knives, scopes, accessories, and ammo!

2. A FOID card must be presented in beginning the purchase process. Out of state residents are required to also provide valid ID for purchasing.

3. Background checks are mandatory on all gun sales, not excluding transactions between private parties.

4. After presenting said FOID card, the buyer must fill out complete Federal Form ATF 4473 (Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearm and Explosives Firearm Transaction Record) to begin the background check process for any gun purchase.  The background check is then run by the Illinois State Police. Once permission is granted, the buyer is subject to a 24 hour pick up wait period for long-barrel guns, and 72 hours for handguns.

Gun and Knife Show Rules for Selling

If you are interested in selling firearms or knives at our gun and knife show, you’ll need to know the lay of the land; here are some bullet points to note to maximize your sales success:

  • Acquire your store-front.  An 8′ table runs just , and grants you a sale platform for the course of the gun and knife show (Saturday 9-5, and Sunday 9-3).
  • Make sure you make use of the set up time on Friday starting at 12:00 PM to 8PM and Saturday 7:00 AM to 9 AM. Vendors are responsible for tying firearms inoperable for the gun and knife show, and for following all state and federal laws. Taking advantage of the full set up time ensures that your table is both presentable, and to the book.
  •   It is important to note that the table must be attended by the vendor(s) throughout the entirety of the event. Additionally, be on time, for there is a No-Show policy for tables: failure to arrive by 8:30 will result in the table being granted to those waiting for a table.

Illinois Largest Hunting & Trade Show

BUY – SELL – TRADE – GUNS – KNIVES – SCOPES – AMMO – ACCESSORIES – FOID CARDS PROCESSED – AND MUCH MORE!

Saturday: 9am – 5pm
Sunday: 9am – 3pm

General Admission .00

Free parking – Handicapped Accessible

People also ask
More FAQs for illinois gun show
  • Where are the gun shows in Illinois?

    This Rock Island gun show is held at QCCA Expo Center and hosted by Pope Creek Shows. All federal, state and local firearm ordinances and laws must be… The Peoria Gun & Knife Show will be held on Mar 19th-20th, 2022 in Peoria, IL. This Peoria gun show is held at Exposition Gardens and hosted by Pope Creek Shows.
    Northern Illinois Gun Shows • 2021 list of gun & knife shows
  • What is the purpose of a gun show?

    Gun shows also serve another purpose: They give private individuals who want to sell or trade firearms access to large numbers of potential buyers and traders. These gun transfers are not regulated by law in most states, a move that is praised by gun rights defenders.

    At gun shows, both official firearms retailers and private individuals sell and trade firearms to large numbers of potential buyers and traders. These gun transfers are not regulated by law in most states.

    This lack of regulation is called the "gun show loophole." It is praised by gun rights advocates but denounced by gun control supporters, as the loophole allows persons who would not be able to pass a Brady Act gun buyer background check to obtain firearms.

    The federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives has estimated that 5,000 gun shows are held annually in the United States. These shows attract tens of thousands of attendees and result in the transfer of thousands of firearms.

    Between 1968 and 1986, gun dealers were prohibited from selling firearms at gun shows. The Gun Control Act of 1968 barred Federal Firearms License holders from making gun show sales by ordering that all sales must take place at the dealer’s place of business. The Firearm Owners Protection Act of 1986 reversed that portion of the Gun Control Act. The ATF now estimates that as many as 75% of weapons sold at gun shows are sold by licensed dealers.

    The “gun show loophole” refers to the fact that most states do not require background checks for firearms sold or traded at gun shows by private individuals. Federal law requires background checks on guns sold by federally licensed dealers only.

    The federal Gun Control Act of 1968 defined “private sellers” as anyone who sold fewer than four firearms during any 12-month period. However, the 1986 Firearm Owners Protection Act deleted that restriction and loosely defined private sellers as individuals who do not rely on gun sales as the principal way of obtaining their livelihood. Proponents of unregulated gun show sales say that there is no gun show loophole—gun owners are simply selling or trading guns at the shows as they would at their residences.

    Federal legislation has attempted to put an end to the so-called loophole by requiring that all gun show transactions take place through FFL dealers. A 2009 bill attracted several co-sponsors in both the U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate, but Congress ultimately failed to take up consideration of the legislation. Similar bills in 2011, 2013, 2015, and 2019 met the same fate.

    Several states and the District of Columbia have their own gun show background check requirements. As of January 2021, 14 states require some kind of background checks at the point of sale and/or permits for all transfers, including purchases from unlicensed sellers. They are:

    • California
    • Colorado
    • Delaware
    • Illinois
    • Maryland
    • New Jersey
    • New Mexico
    • New York
    • Nevada
    • Oregon
    • Pennsylvania
    • Rhode Island
    • Vermont
    • Washington

    Background checks are required for handguns only in:

    • Connecticut
    • Maryland
    • Pennsylvania

    In 33 states, there are currently no laws—federal or state—regulating firearms sales between private individuals at gun shows. However, even in states where background checks of private sales are not required by law, organizations hosting the gun show may require them as a matter of policy. In addition, private sellers are free to have a third-party, federally licensed gun dealer run background checks even though they may not be required by law.

    Federal "gun show loophole" bills were introduced in nine congressional sessions from 2001 to 2019—two in 2001, two in 2004, one in 2005, one in 2007, two in 2009, two in 2011, and one in 2013, 2015, and 2019. None of them passed.

    In 2015, 2017, and 2019, Rep. Carolyn Maloney (D-New York) introduced gun show loophole acts requiring criminal background checks on all firearms transactions occurring at gun shows. None of the measures became law.

    In 2009, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, founder of the Mayors Against Illegal Guns group, stirred controversy and stimulated the gun show debate when the city hired private investigators to target gun shows in the unregulated states of Ohio, Nevada, and Tennessee.

    According to a report released by Bloomberg’s office, 22 of 33 private sellers sold guns to undercover investigators who informed them that they probably could not pass a background check, while 16 of 17 licensed sellers allowed straw purchases by the undercover investigators. A straw purchase involves an individual who is prohibited from purchasing a firearm recruiting someone else to purchase a gun for him. 

    Gun Show Laws by State and the 'Gun Show Loophole'
  • Where is the Rock Island gun show?

    This Rock Island gun show is held at QCCA Expo Center and hosted by Pope Creek Shows. All federal, state and local firearm ordinances and laws must be… The Bloomington Gun & Knife Show will be held next on Feb 26th-27th, 2022 with additional shows on Jul 23rd-24th, 2022, and Nov 5th-6th, 2022 in Bloomington, IL.
    Illinois Gun Shows • 2021 list of IL gun shows
  • Where is the St Charles gun show held?

    This St Charles gun show is held at Kane County Fairgrounds and hosted by Constellation Inc. All federal, state and local firearm ordinances and laws must be obeyed.
    Kane County Sportsman’s Show 2021 • St Charles, IL
Gun laws in Illinois

15-12-2021 · Gun laws in Illinois regulate the sale, possession, and use of firearms and ammunition in the state of Illinois in the United States. [1] [2] To legally possess firearms or ammunition, Illinois residents must have a Firearm Owners Identification (FOID) card , which is issued by the Illinois State Police to any qualified applicant.

15-12-2021
Illinois's gun law
Location of Illinois in the United States

Gun laws in Illinois regulate the sale, possession, and use of firearms and ammunition in the state of Illinois in the United States.[1][2]

To legally possess firearms or ammunition, Illinois residents must have a Firearm Owners Identification (FOID) card, which is issued by the Illinois State Police to any qualified applicant. Non-residents who may legally possess firearms in their home state are exempt from this requirement.

The state police issue licenses for the concealed carry of handguns to qualified applicants age 21 or older who pass a 16-hour training course. However, any law enforcement agency can object to an individual being granted a license "based upon a reasonable suspicion that the applicant is a danger to himself or herself or others, or a threat to public safety". Objections are considered by a Concealed Carry Licensing Review Board, which decides whether or not the license will be issued, based on "a preponderance of the evidence". Licenses issued by other states are not recognized, except for carry in a vehicle. Open carry is prohibited in most areas. When a firearm is being transported by a person without a concealed carry license, it must be unloaded and enclosed in a case, or broken down in a non-functioning state, or not immediately accessible.

For private sales, the seller must verify the buyer's FOID card, and keep a record of the sale for at least 10 years. Lost or stolen guns must be reported to the police. There is a waiting period of 72 hours to take possession after purchasing a firearm. Possession of automatic firearms, short-barreled shotguns, or suppressors is prohibited. Possession of short-barreled rifles is permitted only for those who have an ATF Curios and Relics license or are a member of a military reenactment group. The state does not restrict the sale or possession of firearms that have been defined as assault weapons, or of magazines that can hold more than a certain number of rounds of ammunition, but some local jurisdictions do restrict them.

Illinois has state preemption for certain areas of gun law, which overrides the home rule guideline in those cases. Some local governments have enacted ordinances that are more restrictive than those of the state in areas not covered by state preemption.

Summary table

Subject/Law Long guns Handguns Relevant statutes Notes
State permit required to purchase? Yes Yes 430 ILCS 65 FOID (Firearm Owner's Identification card) required.
Owner permit required? Yes Yes 430 ILCS 65 FOID required.
Firearm registration? No No
License required for concealed carry? N/A Yes Public Act 098-0063: Firearm Concealed Carry Act Shall-issue with limited discretion.[3] Concealed carry licenses are issued by the state police. Licenses issued by other states are not recognized, but nonresidents from states with "substantially similar" licensing requirements can apply for an Illinois nonresident license.
Open carry allowed? No No 720 ILCS 5/24
Vehicle carry allowed? No Yes Public Act 098-0063: Firearm Concealed Carry Act An Illinois concealed carry license is required for Illinois residents. Non-residents may carry in a vehicle if they are eligible to carry in their home state.
State preemption of local restrictions? Partial Partial Public Act 098-0063: Firearm Concealed Carry Act Preemption for the regulation and transportation of handguns and handgun ammunition. Preemption for laws regulating assault weapons, unless enacted before July 20, 2013.
Assault weapon law? No No Cook Co. Code of Ord. §54-211
Chi. Mun. Code §8-20-170
Cook County and the city of Chicago have separately banned the possession of firearms that they have defined as assault weapons, as have several Chicago suburbs, prior to the preemption deadline of July 20, 2013.
Magazine capacity restriction? No No No state-level restrictions. Some local jurisdictions have enacted various magazine capacity restrictions.
NFA weapons restricted? Yes Yes 720 ILCS 5/24
720 ILCS 5/24-2
Automatic firearms, short-barreled shotguns, and suppressors prohibited. Short-barreled rifles allowed only for Curios and Relics license holders or members of a bona fide military reenactment group. AOW (Any Other Weapon) and large-bore DD (Destructive Device) allowed with proper approval and tax stamp from ATF.
Castle doctrine / stand your ground laws? Partial Partial 720 ILCS 5 Illinois has no stand-your-ground law, however there is also no duty to retreat. The use of force is justified when a person reasonably believes that it is necessary "to prevent imminent death or great bodily harm to himself or another, or the commission of a forcible felony." There are some additional protections for defense against unlawful entry into a dwelling.
Peaceable journey laws? Partial Yes Public Act 098-0063: Firearm Concealed Carry Act Illinois has state preemption for the transportation of handguns and handgun ammunition. Non-Illinois residents are granted a limited exception to lawfully carry a concealed firearm within a vehicle if they are eligible to carry a firearm in public under the laws of their own state. Non-residents who are permitted to possess a firearm in their own state are not required to have a FOID card. Some localities have banned the possession of assault weapons.
Background checks required for private sales? Yes Yes 430 ILCS 65 The seller must verify the buyer's FOID card with the Illinois State Police, and must keep a record of the sale for at least ten years. Effective January 1, 2024, private sales of firearms must be done through a gun dealer with a Federal Firearms License (FFL).
Red flag law? Yes Yes Public Act 100-0607: Firearms Restraining Order Act
430 ILCS 65
Family members or police can petition a judge to issue an order to confiscate the firearms of a person deemed an immediate and present danger to themselves or others. The person's firearms must be returned to them within six months unless the court finds grounds to renew the suspension. Additionally, under certain circumstances the Illinois State Police can revoke the FOID of a person who has been determined to be a clear and present danger to themselves or to others.
Waiting period? Yes Yes Public Act 100-0606 After purchasing a firearm, the waiting period before the buyer can take possession is 72 hours.

FOID cards

Main article: FOID (firearms)

To legally possess or purchase firearms or ammunition, Illinois residents must have a Firearm Owner's Identification (FOID) card, which is issued by the Illinois State Police.[4] The police must issue FOID cards to eligible applicants. An applicant is disqualified if he or she has been convicted of a felony or an act of domestic violence, is the subject of an order of protection, has been convicted of assault or battery or been a patient in a mental institution within the last five years, has been adjudicated as a mental defective, or is an illegal immigrant.[5] Applicants under the age of 21 must have the written consent of a parent or legal guardian who is also legally able to possess firearms.[6]

When a firearm is sold or transferred, the buyer is required to present their FOID card. This applies to private sales between individuals as well as to sales by Federal Firearms License (FFL) holders.[7] For firearm sales by an FFL holder, or at a gun show, the seller must perform an automated dial-up check with the State Police, to verify that the FOID card is valid, and to redo the background check of the buyer.[4] This additional checking is known as the Firearm Transfer Inquiry Program (FTIP).[8] For private sales not at a gun show, the seller must also verify the buyer's FOID card with the state police, and receive a transfer approval number, either via a web site or with a phone call.[9][10][11][12][13]

Effective January 1, 2024, private sales of firearms must be done through a gun dealer with a Federal Firearms License (FFL).[14][15][16]

The buyer is also required to present their FOID card when purchasing ammunition.[17]

A FOID card does not authorize the carrying of a concealed firearm,[18] but having a FOID card is a prerequisite for obtaining a concealed carry license.[19]

In 2011, in the case of People v. Holmes, the Illinois Supreme Court ruled that non-Illinois residents who are permitted to possess a firearm in their home state are not required to have an Illinois FOID card.[20][21] Non-Illinois residents do not qualify to obtain a FOID card, but the FOID statute does make provisions for applicants who are employed in Illinois as law enforcement officers, armed security officers, or by the U.S. military.[4]

On February 14, 2018, in a ruling that applies only to the defendant, a circuit court in Illinois found that the requirement to obtain a FOID in order to acquire or possess a firearm is unconstitutional. The court ruled that "to require the defendant to fill out a form, provide a picture ID and pay a fee to obtain a FOID card before she can exercise her constitutional right to self-defense with a firearm is a violation of the Second Amendment... and a violation of Article I, Section 22, of the Constitution of the State of Illinois."[22] After the state requested reconsideration, the court ruled on October 16, 2018 that, in addition to reaffirming its previous ruling, the requirement to physically possess a FOID while in possession of a firearm is also unconstitutional.[23] The case, People v Brown, was appealed to the Illinois Supreme Court.[24] The Illinois Supreme Court determined that the case could have reached the same result without presenting a constitutional issue. The circuit court was directed to present a modified judgment that excludes the constitutional finding.[25][26]

Concealed and open carry

The Illinois State Police Department issues licenses for the concealed carry of handguns to qualified applicants age 21 or older who pass a 16-hour training course. Illinois law says that the state police "shall issue" a license to a qualified applicant. However, any law enforcement agency can object to an individual being granted a license "based upon a reasonable suspicion that the applicant is a danger to himself or herself or others, or a threat to public safety". Objections are considered by a Concealed Carry Licensing Review Board, which decides whether or not the license will be issued, based on "a preponderance of the evidence".[19][27][28] Under revised rules implemented in July 2014, the Review Board notifies the applicant by mail of the basis of the objection and identifies the agency that brought it.[29]

In order to apply for a license the applicant must have in their possession the certificate from the required training, a valid drivers license or state ID card, a valid FOID card, a head and shoulder electronic photograph taken in the last 30 days, ten years of documented residency, fingerprints (optional, but submitting an application without prints increases the potential processing time from 90 to 120 days),[30] and the application fee.[31]

Permits cost 0 for residents or 0 for non-residents, and are valid for five years. An Illinois resident is defined as someone who qualifies for an Illinois driver's license or state identification card due to establishment of a primary domicile in Illinois.[32] A non-resident is someone who has not resided in Illinois for more than 30 days and resides in another state or territory.[19]

Non-residents may apply if their state is on a list of states with laws related to firearm ownership, possession, and carrying, that are "substantially similar" to the requirements to obtain a carry license in Illinois. A non-resident applicant must also possess a carry license or permit from his or her state of residence, if applicable. Prior to February 2017, the Illinois State Police considered only Hawaii, New Mexico, South Carolina, and Virginia to qualify as substantially similar.[33] In February 2017, the list of substantially similar states changed to Arkansas, Mississippi, Texas, and Virginia.[34] Idaho and Nevada were added to the list in 2020.[35] Illinois concealed carry licensees from the three states removed from the list of approved states received letters stating that their Illinois licenses were no longer valid.[35]

Concealed carry permits or licenses issued by other states are not recognized, except that non-residents in possession of a carry permit or license from their home state may carry in a vehicle while traveling through Illinois.[19][27]

Illinois property owners may prohibit concealed carry with a sign

Concealed carry is prohibited on public transportation, at a bar or restaurant that gets more than half its revenue from the sale of alcohol, at a public gathering or special event that requires a permit (e.g. a street fair or festival), at a place where alcohol is sold for special events, and on private property where the owner has chosen not to allow it (and, unless the property is a private residence, has posted an appropriate sign). Concealed carry is also not allowed at any school, college or university, preschool or daycare facility, government building, courthouse, prison, jail, detention facility, hospital, playground, park, Cook County Forest Preserve area, stadium or arena for college or professional sports, amusement park, riverboat casino, off-track betting facility, library, zoo, museum, airport, nuclear facility, or place where firearms are prohibited under federal law. However, concealed carry license holders who are in the parking lot of a prohibited location (except a nuclear facility) are allowed to carry a concealed firearm when they are in their vehicle, and to store their gun locked in their vehicle and out of plain view.[19][27] On February 1, 2018, the Illinois Supreme Court unanimously ruled that the state's ban on possession of a firearm within 1,000 feet of a public park was unconstitutional.[36] On June 14, 2018, the Illinois Appellate Court ruled the law banning carrying firearms within 1,000 feet of a school to be unconstitutional.[37]

When a license holder is carrying a concealed handgun, and is asked by a police officer if they are carrying, there is a duty to inform the officer that they are. This can be done with a verbal reply, or by showing their concealed handgun license.[38]

In accordance with federal law, persons who have been convicted of a felony, or of a misdemeanor act of domestic violence, are ineligible to receive a concealed carry license. In Illinois persons who, within the last five years, have been convicted of a misdemeanor involving the use of force or violence, or received two convictions for driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs, or been in residential or court-ordered treatment for substance abuse, are also ineligible to receive a license.[39] There are other conditions that make an applicant ineligible under state law, including having been a patient in a mental health facility in the last five years.[19]

In compliance with the federal Law Enforcement Officers Safety Act, off-duty and retired police officers who qualify annually under state guidelines are allowed to carry concealed.[40]

Open carry of firearms is generally illegal, except when hunting, or on one's own land, or in one's own dwelling or fixed place of business, or on the land or in the dwelling or fixed place of business of another person with that person's permission.[41][42]

When a firearm is being transported it must be (a) unloaded and enclosed in a case, firearm carrying box, shipping box, or other container, or (b) broken down in a non-functioning state, or (c) not immediately accessible, or (d) carried or possessed in accordance with the Firearm Concealed Carry Act by a person with a valid concealed carry license.[43]

On June 14, 2018, the Illinois Appellate Court said that the mere possession of a gun does not constitute probable cause for arrest.[44]

Historical state prohibition of concealed carry

Illinois was the last state to pass a law to allow the concealed carry of firearms by citizens.[45][46] The state's original handgun carry ban was enacted in 1949, with the ban's most recent revision being enacted in 1962.[47] The pre-existing law forbade concealed carry, and generally prohibited open carry, except in counties that had enacted ordinances allowing open carry. On December 11, 2012, a three-judge panel of the U.S. Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals, in the case of Moore v. Madigan, ruled that Illinois' concealed carry ban was unconstitutional, and gave the state 180 days to change its laws.[48] Subsequently, the court granted a 30-day extension of the deadline.[49] On July 9, 2013, Illinois enacted the Firearm Concealed Carry Act, which established a system for the issuing of concealed carry licenses.[50][51] On September 12, 2013, the Illinois Supreme Court, in the case of People v. Aguilar, also ruled that the state's Aggravated Unlawful Use of a Weapon law, which completely prohibited concealed carry, was unconstitutional.[52] On January 5, 2014, the state police began accepting applications for licenses to carry concealed handguns.[53] On February 28, 2014, the state police announced that they had begun issuing concealed carry licenses.[54]

Other state laws

Article 1 section 22 of the Illinois Constitution states, "Subject only to the police power, the right of the individual citizen to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed."[55]

When purchasing a firearm in Illinois there is a 72-hour waiting period after the sale before the buyer can take possession.[56]

When a firearm is sold by a licensed dealer, the seller is required to provide a gun lock, unless the firearm itself includes an integrated locking mechanism.[57]

For private sales, the seller is required to keep a record of the transfer for at least 10 years.[7]

Lost or stolen guns must be reported to the police within 72 hours.[9][58]

A gun owner can be charged with a crime if a minor under the age of 14 gains access to their firearm when it is unsecured (i.e. not locked in a box or secured with a trigger lock) and causes death or great bodily harm.[59]

Regarding Title II weapons, the possession of automatic firearms (such as machine guns), short-barreled shotguns, and suppressors is prohibited.[43] Possession of short-barreled rifles is allowed for ATF Curios and Relics license holders, or, if the rifle is historically accurate has an overall length of at least 26 inches, for members of a bona fide military reenactment group.[60] While possession of a large-bore destructive device itself is not prohibited, possession of an artillery projectile, shell or grenade with over 1/4 ounce of explosive is prohibited.[43] There is no prohibition against non-sporting shotguns (such as the Armsel Striker) deemed destructive devices by the ATF, nor is there one for AOWs (Any Other Weapons). There is a specific prohibition against the possession of firearms designed to appear as a wireless telephone.[61]

In Illinois, muzzleloaders and black powder guns are considered firearms.[18]

Air guns that are larger than .18 caliber and that have a muzzle velocity greater than 700 feet per second are also regulated as firearms.[62]

To purchase or possess a Taser or stun gun, a Firearm Owners Identification (FOID) card is required. There is a 24-hour waiting period between purchase and taking possession.[4][63] On March 21, 2019, the Illinois Supreme Court ruled unanimously that the ban on carrying Tasers or stun guns in public violated the Second Amendment and was therefore unconstitutional. The court stated that Tasers and stun guns are not covered under the state's concealed carry laws. It also said that since Tasers and stun guns are less lethal than firearms, they are entitled to at least as much legal protection.[64][65]

Illinois has no stand-your-ground law, but there is also no duty to retreat. The use of force is justified when a person reasonably believes that it is necessary "to prevent imminent death or great bodily harm to himself or another, or the commission of a forcible felony." There are some additional protections for defense against unlawful entry into a dwelling.[66][67]

Illinois has a red flag law that allows family members or police to petition a judge to issue an order to confiscate the firearms of a person deemed an immediate and present danger to themselves or others. The petitioner must prove by clear and convincing evidence that the person poses a danger by having a firearm. The hearing for issuing the order may be done without the person being present, but the person may then request a hearing, to be held within two weeks, where they may defend themselves. If the order of confiscation is upheld, the person's guns may be taken away, and their FOID card suspended, for up to six months. After that the person's guns must be returned to them, and their FOID card reinstated, unless the court finds grounds to renew the suspension.[56]

If a qualified medical examiner, law enforcement official, or school administrator determines that a gun owner's mental state makes them "a clear and present danger" to themselves or to others, they must report this to the Illinois State Police (ISP) within 24 hours. The ISP may then revoke the person's Firearm Owners Identification (FOID) card, making them ineligible to legally possess firearms.[4][68]

Firearm dealers must be licensed by the state. To obtain a state license, a gun store must submit proof that it has a Federal Firearms License. The store must have surveillance equipment, maintain an electronic inventory, establish anti-theft measures, and require employees to receive training annually.[69]

It is illegal to sell, import, or manufacture a handgun "having a barrel, slide, frame or receiver which is a die casting of zinc alloy or any other nonhomogeneous metal which will melt or deform at a temperature of less than 800 degrees Fahrenheit." Private sales are exempt from this restriction, and it is legal to possess such a gun.[1][70][71]

Local laws

Illinois has state preemption of firearm laws for "the regulation, licensing, possession, and registration of handguns and ammunition for a handgun, and the transportation of any firearm and ammunition". There is also state preemption for "the regulation of the possession and ownership of assault weapons", except for laws passed before July 20, 2013, which are grandfathered in.[19] In other areas of gun law, some local governments have passed ordinances that are more restrictive than those of the state.[72]

Chicago has banned the possession of certain semi-automatic firearms that it defines as assault weapons, as well as laser sights.[73][74] Chicago residents must "immediately" report a firearm that is stolen or lost, and must report the transfer of a firearm within 48 hours of such transfer.[75] In a home where a person younger than 18 is present, all guns must be secured with a trigger lock, or stored in a locked container, or secured to the body of the legal owner.[76]

Chicago formerly prohibited the sale of firearms within city limits, but on January 6, 2014, a federal judge ruled that this was unconstitutional.[77] The judge granted the city's request for six months to pass new laws regulating gun shops.[78] On June 25, 2014, the city council passed a new law, allowing gun stores but restricting them to certain limited areas of the city, requiring that all gun sales be videotaped, and limiting buyers to one gun per 30-day period. Store owners must make their records available to the police, and employees must be trained to identify possible straw purchasers.[79] With the passage of the gun shop ordinance, Chicago also struck a previous ban on the transfer of ammunition.[80] On January 18, 2017, a federal appeals court ruled that the city's revised gun shop law was unconstitutional.[81]

Cook County has banned the possession of certain semi-automatic firearms that it has defined as assault weapons.[82][83] Residents must report to the county sheriff within 48 hours any firearms that are stolen, lost, destroyed, or sold or otherwise transferred. The sheriff may share this information with other law enforcement agencies.[84][85] Licensed firearms dealers must provide information to the county regarding purchasers and the guns they purchase, and receive approval before conducting sales.[86] An individual may not purchase more than one firearm in a 30-day period.[87] In a home where a person younger than 21 is present, all guns must be secured with a trigger lock, or stored unloaded in a locked container separate from the ammunition, or secured to the body of the legal owner.[88] In Cook County, local laws, such as those of Chicago, take precedence over county laws that regulate similar matters.[89] Cook County imposes a twenty-five dollar tax on the sale of any firearm by a retail dealer, in addition to the usual county sales tax. The county also has a tax on the sale of ammunition — five cents per round for centerfire ammunition and one cent per round for rimfire ammunition.[90][91]

The possession of firearms that have been variously defined as assault weapons is also illegal in Lincolnwood, Skokie, Evanston, Highland Park, North Chicago, Melrose Park, Riverdale, Dolton, Hazel Crest, Homewood, and the part of Buffalo Grove that's in Cook County. The storage or transportation of assault weapons is restricted in Morton Grove, Winnetka, Country Club Hills, and University Park.[92][93][94][95][96][97][98] Sales and transfers of assault weapons are prohibited in Niles.[99][100][101] In December 2015, the U.S. Supreme Court declined to hear the case of Friedman v. Highland Park, a challenge to that city's assault weapons ban.[102]Deerfield had passed an ordinance in 2013 that regulated the storage and transportation of assault weapons and high capacity magazines; in April 2018 the ordinance was amended to ban possession.[103][104] In June 2018 the law was blocked from going into effect by a Lake County Circuit Court judge who held that the ordinance violates a state preemption statute; in March 2019 the judge ruled that the law was invalid, and permanently barred the village from enforcing it.[105][106][107] In December 2020, a state appellate court overturned the ruling, allowing the ban to go into effect.[108] In November 2021 the Illinois Supreme Court let this ruling stand by a vote of 3 to 3.[109]

The East St. Louis Housing Authority's ban on firearm possession by residents of public housing was struck down by a federal judge on April 11, 2019.[110][111]

Other municipalities have also enacted various firearm restrictions.[112]

Some counties have adopted Second Amendment sanctuary resolutions in opposition to some gun control laws.[113][114][115]

Historical restrictions on the possession of handguns

Formerly some Illinois municipalities had laws restricting the possession of handguns.

By the late 1980s, several Illinois municipalities had banned the possession of handguns. Chicago required the registration of all firearms but did not allow handguns to be registered, which had the effect of outlawing their possession, unless they were grandfathered in by being registered before April 16, 1982.[116][117] Additionally, several Chicago suburbs had enacted outright prohibitions on handgun possession.[118]

On June 26, 2008, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down Washington, D.C.'s handgun ban in the case of District of Columbia v. Heller.[119] Chicago and the other municipalities came under legal pressure to change their laws.[120][121] In the months following the Heller decision, handgun bans were repealed in the suburbs of Wilmette,[122]Morton Grove,[123]Evanston,[124] and Winnetka,[125] but Chicago and Oak Park kept their laws in effect.[124][126]

On June 28, 2010, in the case of McDonald v. Chicago, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled the handgun bans of Chicago and Oak Park to be unconstitutional.[127]

On July 12, 2010, a new Chicago city ordinance took effect that allowed the possession of handguns with certain restrictions. Residents were required to obtain a Chicago Firearms Permit. To get the permit they were required to complete a 5-hour firearms training course, pass a background check (including fingerprinting), and pay a 0 permit fee. Chicago's gun registration requirement was retained, with new registrations being allowed for the first time since 1982.[128][129] Possession of firearms was permitted only inside a dwelling, not in a garage or on the outside grounds of the property. Only one gun at a time was allowed to be kept in a usable state.[128]

On July 19, 2010, Oak Park amended its town ordinance to allow handgun possession in one's home, leaving no remaining town in Illinois that completely banned handguns.[130]

On July 9, 2013, Illinois enacted the Firearm Concealed Carry Act, which set up a permitting system for the concealed carry of firearms. Another provision of this law is state preemption for "the regulation, licensing, possession, and registration of handguns and ammunition for a handgun, and the transportation of any firearm and ammunition". This invalidated Chicago's requirements for gun registration and for an additional permit for the possession of firearms.[19][131]

On September 11, 2013, the Chicago City Council repealed the law requiring the registration of firearms and the law requiring a city issued firearm owners permit.[131][132] They also changed the law to allow the carrying of firearms on the grounds of one's property outside as well as inside the home.[133]

Knives

In Illinois, it is illegal to possess a throwing star or ballistic knife. A knife with a blade more than 3 in (76 mm) in length is considered a dangerous weapon, and it is illegal to carry such a knife with an intent to inflict harm on another person's well-being.[134][135]

Some local governments have knife laws that are more restrictive than those of the state. In Chicago, it is illegal to carry a knife with a blade more than 2.5 in (64 mm) in length.[136]

See also

  • FOID (firearms)
  • Law of Illinois
  • McDonald v. Chicago
  • Moore v. Madigan
  • People v. Aguilar

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  125. ^ Black, Lisa (November 19, 2008). "Winnetka Repeals Handgun Ban" Archived 2012-02-18 at the Wayback Machine, Chicago Tribune. Retrieved January 22, 2012.
  126. ^ Williams-Harris, Deanese, and Patterson, Melissa (July 26, 2008). "Daley Promises to Fight to Keep Handgun Ban", Chicago Tribune. Retrieved December 23, 2011.
  127. ^ Liptak, Adam (June 28, 2010). "Justices Extend Firearm Rights in 5–4 Ruling", New York Times. Retrieved December 23, 2011.
  128. ^ a b Byrne, John and Dardick, Hal (July 2, 2010). "City Council Passes Daley Gun Restrictions 45-0", Chicago Tribune. Retrieved December 23, 2011.
  129. ^ Lee, William (December 12, 2010). "Gun Owners: Permit Process Not Exactly as Fast as a Speeding Bullet", Chicago Tribune. Retrieved December 23, 2011.
  130. ^ Sun-Times Media Wire (July 20, 2010). "Oak Park Law Amended to Allow Guns in Registered Users' Homes", Fox Chicago News. Retrieved January 22, 2012.
  131. ^ a b Spielman, Fran (September 11, 2013). "City Council Approves Contradictory Gun Laws", Chicago Sun-Times. Retrieved September 11, 2013.
  132. ^ Yaccino, Steven (September 11, 2013). "Chicago City Council Reluctantly Ends Gun Registry", New York Times. Retrieved January 31, 2016.
  133. ^ Dellimore, Craig (September 9, 2013). "City Council Committee Approves Rewrite Of Gun Laws", CBS News. Retrieved September 11, 2013.
  134. ^ Hunt, Rhian (July 23, 2015). "Knife Laws in Illinois", Knife Den. Retrieved January 30, 2016.
  135. ^ "Illinois Knife Law", Knife Up. Retrieved January 30, 2016.
  136. ^ Lardner, Sheridan (August 3, 2012). "Responsible Knife Carrying (Part 1)", Chicago Warrior. Retrieved January 30, 2016.
Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Gun_laws_in_Illinois&oldid=1060421101"
kanecountygunshow.com

The Kane County Sportsman’s Show is held in the heated Kane County Fairgrounds buildings west of St. Charles, IL at 525 S. Randall Road between Route 64 (North Ave.) and Route 38 (Roosevelt Road). View map. This show has been run by the same family for over 30 years! All shows are on Sunday only and the doors are open from 7:30 am to 1:30 pm.

The April 10th, 2022

Kane County Sportsman's Show

Is approved!

This Month's Special is

Bratwurst!

We will have our show on Sunday, April 10th, 2022.

7:30 am to 1:30 pm.

Kitchen is back to normal!

Country Breakfast & Lunch Served.

Hand sanitizer & masks will be available.

Thank you for your patience and understanding. Mick.

Kane County Sportsman’s Show

Copyright © All rights reserved. Made By Morgan.

Buy, Sell, Trade Firearms and all related items!

SYSTEMS

The Kane County Sportsman’s Show is held in the heated Kane County Fairgrounds buildings west of St. Charles, IL at 525 S. Randall Road between Route 64 (North Ave.) and Route 38 (Roosevelt Road).  View map.

This show has been run by the same family for over 30 years!  All shows are on Sunday only and the doors are open from 7:30 am to 1:30 pm.

The annual calendar of ALL Illinois gun shows is available FREE at the show.

Our show season begins in October and ends with our May 15th show 1 week after Mother’s Day.

Buy, sell and trade firearms and all related items.  Fishing tackle, military, air guns, muzzle loading, Indian artifacts, swords, gun parts, knives, reloading components, books, Indian jewelry, hunting gear, gun safes, display cases, clothing, etc.

More than 250 vendor tables!

Free parking and only .00 admission.     A show for the whole family!

Our kitchen features a delicious Country Breakfast and Lunch during the show.

Refreshments

Firearm Transfer Forms available for firearm sales between Illinois residents.

~~~~~~~~~~

FOID card required for ILLINOIS residents

to buy guns or ammunition.

We have licensed dealers who can appraise and purchase firearms on site!

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Illinois State Police ONLY accepts on-line F.O.I.D. Card applications now.

Phone:  815-217-2266

Email:  [email protected]

Kane county gun show sport show memorabilia military collectable collectible kane county  northern Illinois gun show.

Randall road, St. Charles, IL Illinois gun show dealers guns 2010 schedule reload muzzle  indian artefacts clothing books gun safe

*

2022 Dates

Apr 10, May 15

Oct 9, Nov 13, Dec 11

Northern Illinois Gun Show - Illinois gun show - Randall Road, St. Charles, IL - Kane County Gun Show

The Next

Kane County Sportsman's Show

Starts In:

Check Later for Next Show!

bcfairgrounds.net

Introducing: The Belle-Clair Fairgrounds’ Illinois Gun and Knife Show! Our massive event is loaded with high caliber vendors, guns and knives spanning as far as the eye can see. Ranging from antiques for display to guns ready for action, our Illinois Gun Show has a huge amount of variety; our vendors go to great lengths to make sure to give you the best shot at finding the gun or …

On the hunt for an Illinois Gun Show to explore? Our Gun and Knife Show Is second to none!

The Best Illinois Gun Show Located at The Belle-Clair Fairgrounds

When it comes to shopping for guns and knives, the best and most unique pieces aren’t easy to find. Where does an enthusiast have the greatest chance of success? Introducing: The Belle-Clair Fairgrounds’ Illinois Gun and Knife Show!

Our massive event is loaded with high caliber vendors, guns and knives spanning as far as the eye can see. Ranging from antiques for display to guns ready for action, our Illinois Gun Show has a huge amount of variety; our vendors go to great lengths to make sure to give you the best shot at finding the gun or knife you have been dreaming of.

Enjoy our enormous hall where vendors display their wares, and answer all your questions about them too! Knowledgeable in both the history, and the operation of these firearms, our vendors are the cream of the crop for gun and knife show excellence. Furthermore, located just 10 clicks from downtown St. Louis, this event is easy to find and convenient to attend; take the shot and you’ll be sure glad you did!

Gun and Knife Show Excellence

Many factors separate our gun and knife show from the others: variety, vendor expertise, location, and size of event, all go into making this a standout event from what you are used to.

For just admission, it will feel like Christmas Day when you walk through the doors, a taste of the way things used to be. From Bowie knives to Brownings, pistols to pocketknives, shotguns to sabres, you’ll be thrilled at the quality of our gun and knife show variety. Sharpen up on your knowledge of classic firearm antiquities, test the balance of a new blade. Feel free to embrace who you are and what you enjoy, amongst fellow gun and knife show enthusiasts you will fit right in.

Hundreds of gun vendors are eager to please and put their best foot forward for our event. Furthermore, our event is all about legitimacy! Expect to find reputable vendors who are serious about their craft. Additionally, those who are looking to sell or trade their guns or knives have an opportunity to make some money back, or spice up their gun rack with a new addition. Keep your ear close to the ground, and you might pick up on some especially good deals or particularly special pieces.

Our safe atmosphere ensures fun for the whole family. An indoor, climate controlled event means that rain or shine, the event is a go!  With all of this being said, keep your powder dry and be ready to pounce on our magnificent gun and knife show. Rest assured, though there are many gun and knife shows, there isn’t any quite like ours.

We are proud to serve our community with our Illinois gun show; providing the finest gun and knife show in the lands to the finest customers is our mission statement (because you deserve it). We extend a gracious THANK YOU for your continued patronage and attendance that makes this possible!

traderscreek.com

March 26 - March 27. Mercer County Fairgrounds, 848 170th St. Aledo, Illinois 61231 United States + Google Map. Aledo Gun-Knife Show information of gun show by date cost contact information & maps of these Illinois gun show locations. Find out more ».

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If you enjoy the shooting sports, hunting, or family protection, you should attend a gun show. First, gun shows are fun – you will find people with similar interests. Second, you will meet experts in shooting, hunting, archery and general sporting information and they are always willing to help. Third, attend and support your and everyone’s second amendment rights. And make sure you join a club, my preference is the NRA.

Gun Show Laws by State and the 'Gun Show Loophole'

In 33 states, there are currently no laws—federal or state—regulating firearms sales between private individuals at gun shows.   However, even in states where background checks of private sales are not required by law, organizations hosting the gun show may require them as a matter of policy.

At gun shows, both official firearms retailers and private individuals sell and trade firearms to large numbers of potential buyers and traders. These gun transfers are not regulated by law in most states.

This lack of regulation is called the "gun show loophole." It is praised by gun rights advocates but denounced by gun control supporters, as the loophole allows persons who would not be able to pass a Brady Act gun buyer background check to obtain firearms.

The federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives has estimated that 5,000 gun shows are held annually in the United States. These shows attract tens of thousands of attendees and result in the transfer of thousands of firearms.

Between 1968 and 1986, gun dealers were prohibited from selling firearms at gun shows. The Gun Control Act of 1968 barred Federal Firearms License holders from making gun show sales by ordering that all sales must take place at the dealer’s place of business. The Firearm Owners Protection Act of 1986 reversed that portion of the Gun Control Act. The ATF now estimates that as many as 75% of weapons sold at gun shows are sold by licensed dealers.

The “gun show loophole” refers to the fact that most states do not require background checks for firearms sold or traded at gun shows by private individuals. Federal law requires background checks on guns sold by federally licensed dealers only.

The federal Gun Control Act of 1968 defined “private sellers” as anyone who sold fewer than four firearms during any 12-month period. However, the 1986 Firearm Owners Protection Act deleted that restriction and loosely defined private sellers as individuals who do not rely on gun sales as the principal way of obtaining their livelihood. Proponents of unregulated gun show sales say that there is no gun show loophole—gun owners are simply selling or trading guns at the shows as they would at their residences.

Federal legislation has attempted to put an end to the so-called loophole by requiring that all gun show transactions take place through FFL dealers. A 2009 bill attracted several co-sponsors in both the U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate, but Congress ultimately failed to take up consideration of the legislation. Similar bills in 2011, 2013, 2015, and 2019 met the same fate.

Several states and the District of Columbia have their own gun show background check requirements. As of January 2021, 14 states require some kind of background checks at the point of sale and/or permits for all transfers, including purchases from unlicensed sellers. They are:

  • California
  • Colorado
  • Delaware
  • Illinois
  • Maryland
  • New Jersey
  • New Mexico
  • New York
  • Nevada
  • Oregon
  • Pennsylvania
  • Rhode Island
  • Vermont
  • Washington

Background checks are required for handguns only in:

  • Connecticut
  • Maryland
  • Pennsylvania

In 33 states, there are currently no laws—federal or state—regulating firearms sales between private individuals at gun shows. However, even in states where background checks of private sales are not required by law, organizations hosting the gun show may require them as a matter of policy. In addition, private sellers are free to have a third-party, federally licensed gun dealer run background checks even though they may not be required by law.

Federal "gun show loophole" bills were introduced in nine congressional sessions from 2001 to 2019—two in 2001, two in 2004, one in 2005, one in 2007, two in 2009, two in 2011, and one in 2013, 2015, and 2019. None of them passed.

In 2015, 2017, and 2019, Rep. Carolyn Maloney (D-New York) introduced gun show loophole acts requiring criminal background checks on all firearms transactions occurring at gun shows. None of the measures became law.

In 2009, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, founder of the Mayors Against Illegal Guns group, stirred controversy and stimulated the gun show debate when the city hired private investigators to target gun shows in the unregulated states of Ohio, Nevada, and Tennessee.

According to a report released by Bloomberg’s office, 22 of 33 private sellers sold guns to undercover investigators who informed them that they probably could not pass a background check, while 16 of 17 licensed sellers allowed straw purchases by the undercover investigators. A straw purchase involves an individual who is prohibited from purchasing a firearm recruiting someone else to purchase a gun for him. 

Chicago Civil War Show Sale | Wheaton, IL

Welcome. The DuPage County Fairgrounds semi-annual MASSIVE Chicagoland CIVIL WAR & Collector Arms (CADA) Show and Sale. The DuPage, IL Civil War Show, will bring delight to the Civil War Enthusiast. Civil War and Collector Arms dealers from throughout the United States will be offering 1000’s of Civil War Treasures and Memorabilia.

The DuPage County Fairgrounds semi-annual MASSIVE Chicagoland CIVIL WAR & Collector Arms (CADA) Show and Sale. The DuPage, IL Civil War Show, will bring delight to the Civil War Enthusiast.

Civil War and Collector Arms dealers from throughout the United States will be offering 1000’s of Civil War Treasures and Memorabilia. The history of America’s Great Heritage can be viewed on the 100’s of tables of unique artifacts offered for sale.

In addition to CIVIL WAR ANTIQUITIES for sale, there will also be memorabilia from the REVOLUTIONARY WAR and the SPANISH AMERICAN WAR. Dealers will be bringing their BEST wares for this greatly anticipated event. A special display of CIVIL WAR cannons and artillery will also be there for viewing.

Please be sure to sign up for our email list on show updates, special offers, and notices using the form down below.

1,000’s of Civil War Treasures plus, Revolutionary War, and Spanish American War Memorabilia

April 23 and SEPTEMBER 24, 2022

Hours: 9am to 4pm / .  DuPage County Fairgrounds, Wheaton, IL.  Free Parking.   Please call Zurko Promotions at 715-526-9769 for details.

It seems that in this world fewer and fewer people attempt to say “thank you”. I’d rather not be one of them but through this email I offer my thanks to you and your family for going “above and beyond” in your efforts to bring about a wonderful Civil War Show in Wheaton last weekend. I can’t say enough about your extra efforts to bring me back into the fold so to speak since it had been seven years since I had set up at a show. I’m glad to be back. I set up to sell a few things and was more successful than I had hoped to be. I came to buy from a prepared list and I bought as well. The weather was not your department, but it was glorious. My wife and I would very much like to return in September if our schedule allows. I have already begun to distribute your fliers for Centreville. Thanks again for everything!

Al McGeehan

You folks set the standard for shows!

Harvey Warrner - Crossroads Of America Civil War Show
NRA-ILA

Find state gun laws including conceal carry, open carry, licensing, and more. News ... manufacture or use any metal piercing, dragon’s breath shotgun shell, bolo shell, flechette shell, or ...

Application for a FOID is made to the Illinois State Police, FOID, P. O. Box 19233, Springfield, IL 62794-9233. Application forms can be obtained online at http://www.isp.state.il.us or by calling the Firearm Owners Identification Program at (217) 782-7980. An applicant is entitled to a FOID if he:

(i) He or she is 21 years of age or over, or if he or she is under 21 years of age that he or she has the written consent of his or her parent or legal guardian to possess and acquire firearms and firearm ammunition and that he or she has never been convicted of a misdemeanor other than a traffic offense or adjudged delinquent, provided, however, that such parent or legal guardian is not an individual prohibited from having a Firearm Owner's Identification Card and files an affidavit with the Department as prescribed by the Department stating that he or she is not an individual prohibited from having a Card;

(ii) He or she has not been convicted of a felony under the laws of this or any other jurisdiction;

(iii) He or she is not addicted to narcotics;

(iv) He or she has not been a patient in a mental health facility within the past 5 years or, if he or she has been a patient in a mental health facility more than 5 years ago submit the certification required under subsection (u) of Section 8 of this Act;

(v) He or she is not intellectually disabled;

(vi) He or she is not an alien who is unlawfully present in the United States under the laws of the United States;

(vii) He or she is not subject to an existing order of protection prohibiting him or her from possessing a firearm;

(viii) He or she has not been convicted within the past 5 years of battery, assault, aggravated assault, violation of an order of protection, or a substantially similar offense in another jurisdiction, in which a firearm was used or possessed;

(ix) He or she has not been convicted of domestic battery, aggravated domestic battery, or a substantially similar offense in another jurisdiction committed before, on or after January 1, 2012 (the effective date of Public Act 97-158). If the applicant knowingly and intelligently waives the right to have an offense described in this clause (ix) tried by a jury, and by guilty plea or otherwise, results in a conviction for an offense in which a domestic relationship is not a required element of the offense but in which a determination of the applicability of 18 U.S.C. 922(g)(9) is made under Section 112A-11.1 of the Code of Criminal Procedure of 1963, an entry by the court of a judgment of conviction for that offense shall be grounds for denying the issuance of a Firearm Owner's Identification Card under this Section;

(x) (Blank);

(xi) He or she is not an alien who has been admitted to the United States under a non-immigrant visa (as that term is defined in Section 101(a) (26) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1101(a)(26))), or that he or she is an alien who has been lawfully admitted to the United States under a non-immigrant visa if that alien is:

(1) admitted to the United States for lawful hunting or sporting purposes;

(2) an official representative of a foreign government who is:

(A) accredited to the United States Government or the Government's mission to an international organization having its headquarters in the United States; or

(B) en route to or from another country to which that alien is accredited;

(3) an official of a foreign government or distinguished foreign visitor who has been so designated by the Department of State;

(4) a foreign law enforcement officer of a friendly foreign government entering the United States on official business; or

(5) one who has received a waiver from the Attorney General of the United States pursuant to 18 U.S.C. 922(y)(3);

(xii) He or she is not a minor subject to a petition filed under Section 5-520 of the Juvenile Court Act of 1987 alleging that the minor is a delinquent minor for the commission of an offense that if committed by an adult would be a felony;

(xiii) He or she is not an adult who had been adjudicated a delinquent minor under the Juvenile Court Act of 1987 for the commission of an offense that if committed by an adult would be a felony;

(xiv) He or she is a resident of the State of Illinois;

(xv) He or she has not been adjudicated as a mentally disabled person;

(xvi) He or she has not been involuntarily admitted into a mental health facility; and

(xvii) He or she is not developmentally disabled; and

(3) Upon request by the Department of State Police, sign a release on a form prescribed by the Department of State Police waiving any right to confidentiality and requesting the disclosure to the Department of State Police of limited mental health institution admission information from another state, the District of Columbia, any other territory of the United States, or a foreign nation concerning the applicant for the sole purpose of determining whether the applicant is or was a patient in a mental health institution and disqualified because of that status from receiving a Firearm Owner's Identification Card. No mental health care or treatment records may be requested. The information received shall be destroyed within one year of receipt.

An applicant for a FOID must consent to the Department using the applicant’s digital driver’s license or Illinois ID card photograph, if available, and signature on the FOID, and must furnish the Department with his driver’s license or Illinois ID card number. The Department must approve or deny the FOID within 30 days, and is authorized to deny the FOID only if the applicant does not meet the listed qualifications. The FOID fee is and it is valid for five years from the date of issuance. The Department shall forward to each FOID holder, a notice of expiration and a renewal notice application, 60 days prior to expiration.

A FOID may be revoked and seized if the holder made a false statement on the application, is no longer eligible, or whose mental condition poses a clear and present danger to self, others, or community. A written notice must be given with the grounds for denial or revocation and seizure.

A person whose FOID has been revoked or seized or whose FOID application was denied or not acted upon within 30 days may appeal the decision to the Director of the Department of State Police, unless it was based upon certain violent, drug, or weapons offenses. In that case, the aggrieved person may petition the circuit court in the county of his residence. If the Director upholds the Department’s decision, the applicant may appeal to the courts. Any judicial review generally will be limited to the question of whether the Department’s decision was “arbitrary and capricious.”

430 ILCS 65/4

430 ILCS 65/6

LESS
bcfairgrounds.net

A complete list of exciting events in Belleville offered by the Belle-Clair Fairgrounds & Expo Center! 200 S Belt East - Belleville, IL 62220 (618) 235-0666

January
Happy New YearSAT, SUN - January 1 & 2
Motorcycle SwapSUN - January 9
Flea MarketSAT, SUN January 15 & 16
Trivia NightFRI January 21
Gun ShowSAT, SUN January 29 & 30
February
SICW WrestlingSAT February 5
Auto Swap MeetSUN February 13
Flea MarketSAT, SUN February 19 & 20
Home ShowFRI, SAT, SUN February 25, 26 & 27
March
RV & Camper ShowFRI, SAT, SUN March 4, 5 & 6
Gun & Knife ShowSAT, SUN March 12 & 13
Flea MarketSAT, SUN March 19 & 20
Forever Vintage MarketFRI, SAT, SUN March 25, 26 & 27
April
Brewery CollectibleSAT April 2
Book BazaarMON-SAT April 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 & 9
Easter -NO Flea MarketSAT, SUN April 16 & 17
St. Louis Antique ShowSAT, SUN April 23 & 24
Indoor Yard SaleFRI, SAT April 29 & 30
May
Open Weekend SAT, SUN May 7 & 8
Open WeekendSAT, SUN May 14 & 15
Flea MarketSAT, SUN May 21 & 22
Open WeekendSAT, SUN May 28 & 29
June
Doll ShowSUN June 5
Love A SeniorFRI June 10
Open WeekendSAT & SUN June 11 & 12
Flea MarketSAT & SUN June 18 & 19
Gun ShowSAT & SUN June 25 & 26
July
Open Weekend SAT & SUN July 2 & 3
Knife ShowFRI & SAT July 8 & 9
Flea MarketSAT & SUN July 16 & 17
Open DateSAT & SUN July 23 & 24
Elvis Tribute- Bill CherrySAT July 30
August
Open WeekendSAT & SUN August 6 & 7
Open WeekendSAT & SUN August 13 & 14
Flea MarketSAT & SUN August 20 & 21
Gun & Knife ShowSAT & SUN August 27 & 28
September
Antique ShowSAT & SUN September 3 & 4
Craft & Vendor ShowSAT & SUN September 10 & 11
Flea MarketSAT & SUN September 17 & 18
Shriner's Gun Raffle SAT September 24
October
Open WeekendSAT & SUN October 1 & 2
Gun & Knife ShowSAT & SUN October 8 & 9
Democratic DinnerTBA
Flea MarketSAT & SUN October 15 & 16
Construction Career ExpoTBA
Open DateSAT & SUN October 29 & 30
November
WoodcarversSAT & SUN November 5 & 6
Gifts From The HeartTBA
Brewery, Bottle, JarSAT November 12
Auto Swap MeetSAT November 13
Flea MarketSAT & SUN November 19 & 20
Fall Craft ShowFRI, SAT & SUN November 25, 26, 27
December
Dog ShowSAT & SUN December 3 & 4
Forever Vintage MarketFRI, SAT & SUN December 9,10,11
Flea MarketSAT & SUN December 17 & 18
Merry ChristmasSAT & SUN December 24 & 25